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Swan Lake Ballet

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2002 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It seems very much as if playing the dual role of good swan and bad swan in "Swan Lake" is more difficult than ever for today's American Ballet Theatre dancers. At least, this is the conclusion following swan sightings at four different performances last week at the Orange County Performing Arts Center.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2002 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It seems very much as if playing the dual role of good swan and bad swan in "Swan Lake" is more difficult than ever for today's American Ballet Theatre dancers. At least, this is the conclusion following swan sightings at four different performances last week at the Orange County Performing Arts Center.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1997 | Kristin Hohenadel, Kristin Hohenadel is a writer and editor who lives in Paris
It's an unusually fine spring morning, and Matthew Bourne is in what passes for supreme commander mode. Assembled in front of him, on the floor of a rehearsal studio at the London Theatre Centre, are his troops: the members of his own Adventures in Motion Pictures dance company. Bourne and AMP have already established one beachhead--they've managed to turn their update of the 100-year-old "Swan Lake" into a six-month phenomenon in London's dog-eat-dog West End theater district.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1997 | Stephen Farber, Stephen Farber, movie critic for Movieline magazine, has also written on theater for the New York Times and other publications. His most recent book, with coauthor Marc Green, is "Hollywood on the Couch."
There's no disputing the technical brilliance of Matthew Bourne's acclaimed production of "Swan Lake," which caused a sensation in London before beginning the rest of its world conquest at the Ahmanson Theatre in Los Angeles. This satiric, contemporary riff on royal family dysfunction, complete with male swans and homoerotic pas de deux, is consistently energetic and witty, graced with imaginative choreography and scenic design.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1997 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Adam Cooper, like most male ballet dancers, never expected critics to call him "the sexiest Swan in the business." During his seven years with London's famed Royal Ballet, he might reasonably have aspired to "the best darn Prince in the business"--and indeed, he danced the Prince in "Swan Lake" until his departure from the Royal in March.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1997 | Stephen Farber, Stephen Farber, movie critic for Movieline magazine, has also written on theater for the New York Times and other publications. His most recent book, with coauthor Marc Green, is "Hollywood on the Couch."
There's no disputing the technical brilliance of Matthew Bourne's acclaimed production of "Swan Lake," which caused a sensation in London before beginning the rest of its world conquest at the Ahmanson Theatre in Los Angeles. This satiric, contemporary riff on royal family dysfunction, complete with male swans and homoerotic pas de deux, is consistently energetic and witty, graced with imaginative choreography and scenic design.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1999 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
The last gasp of the Pacific Symphony's 1999 summer season at Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre was a cold one climatically, but musically warmhearted. Guest conductor Barry Jekowsky led a Tchaikovsky Spectacular--still a tradition in Orange County, though abandoned after three decades at Hollywood Bowl--with authority, solidity and a buoyant podium manner.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2002 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No longer gangly, but still boyish, Van Cliburn at 67 remains the charming pianistic icon from Texas, justifiably famous for his smile, his personal magnetism, his Romantic repertory, the major international piano competition he founded in 1962 and his unofficial ambassadorship of all things musically American.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2002
Pop Music "The Rising" finally came out, entering the sales chart at No. 1. The scene-setting interviews and TV appearances are out of the way, and now Bruce Springsteen, right, is back in his element, on the road with the E Street Band. The new album's sober studies of post-9/11 emotions figure to find a counterbalance in Springsteen's customary roof-raising rock 'n' roll release when they play the Forum in Inglewood on Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Swan Princess," the German fairy tale that is the basis for the beloved "Swan Lake" ballet, emerged in 1994 as a pleasant animated musical fantasy aimed at children, especially little girls. Its sequel, "The Swan Princess: Escape from Castle Mountain," opened Friday without benefit of press preview.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1997 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Adam Cooper, like most male ballet dancers, never expected critics to call him "the sexiest Swan in the business." During his seven years with London's famed Royal Ballet, he might reasonably have aspired to "the best darn Prince in the business"--and indeed, he danced the Prince in "Swan Lake" until his departure from the Royal in March.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1997 | Kristin Hohenadel, Kristin Hohenadel is a writer and editor who lives in Paris
It's an unusually fine spring morning, and Matthew Bourne is in what passes for supreme commander mode. Assembled in front of him, on the floor of a rehearsal studio at the London Theatre Centre, are his troops: the members of his own Adventures in Motion Pictures dance company. Bourne and AMP have already established one beachhead--they've managed to turn their update of the 100-year-old "Swan Lake" into a six-month phenomenon in London's dog-eat-dog West End theater district.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1994 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite favorable reviews from many critics, New Line Cinema's "The Swan Princess" was being viewed by Hollywood on Monday as something of a swan dive. The film's lethargic domestic box office opening of $2.4 million has again raised an age-old question in Hollywood: Can a full-length animated movie be a hit if it isn't made by Walt Disney Co.?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1996 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brilliant. Innovative. Wacky. Original. Ernie Kovacs was all of the above and so much more. With his bushy eyebrows, mustache and ever-present cigar, Kovacs was one of the craziest and most visionary comedians to emerge during the Golden Age of TV in the 1950s. He pushed the visual envelope on his comedy-variety series "Ernie in Kovacsland" and "The Ernie Kovacs Show," and in his comedy specials. Kovacs also created the hysterically funny and beloved characters Percy Dovetonsils, Mr.
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