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Swap Meets

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1988 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
Santa Ana city officials on Thursday lost a court bid to prohibit Sunday swap meets at a downtown college campus, which, they argued, were a nuisance and a violation of city zoning ordinances. Eleanor M. Palk, Orange County Superior Court commissioner, declined to shut down El Mercado, in which an estimated 200 merchants have participated. Palk rejected the city's request for a temporary restraining order and scheduled further hearings on the lawsuit.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2012 | By Sam Quinones, Los Angeles Times
By the time Bobby Wilson met Wan Joon Kim, he'd been to 15 record stores. It was 1994, and no one would stock his cassette, "Comin' From Watts," with raps Wilson had written in prison and recorded himself upon his release. Wilson had a daunting resume: a decade-long membership in the Grape Street Watts Crip gang; five years incarcerated for attempted murder; the prison nickname "Kill Kill. " Just out on parole and desperate for money to support his wife and child, Wilson's last stop was the Compton Fashion Center indoor swap meet.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1994 | BILL BILLITER
The City Council has approved a new tax on swap meets, despite protests from a charitable organization that says the action means paying thousands in new taxes rather than using the money in anti-drug efforts. The protest came from Straight Talk Inc., a Cypress-based, nonprofit organization that counsels young people against drug and alcohol abuse. A Straight Talk official said the organization raises a "substantial" part of its annual income from a swap meet held weekly at Cypress College.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2011 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
The hustle begins each day at sundown: " Computadoras !" " Bicicletas !" " Carne asada !" For eight straight blocks along 6th Street in the Westlake neighborhood near downtown, sidewalks are so crowded with vendors and their wares that shoppers barely fit. Cumbia music booms and everything is sold "cheap, cheap, cheap. " It is a peddler's paradise — one that the city plans to begin replacing with its own licensed marketplace. The ArtGricultural Market, a cross between a swap meet and farmer's market, will open Saturday morning just a few blocks south of 6th Street, hoping to persuade merchants to legalize their hawking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1995 | DOUGLAS ALGER
Nearby residents say Valley College officials were "incredibly arrogant" and "insensitive" for planning a weekend swap meet on the campus without considering its impact on surrounding homes. About 150 people gathered Wednesday at a local elementary school and vowed to fight the open-air market they believe will harm property values and burden their Van Nuys neighborhoods with more traffic, crime and noise. "We've already got problems with burglars," said one man.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA
A community swap meet will be allowed to operate at Saddleback College, the City Council decided this week. College officials said they will have the first swap meet on the weekend of Nov. 12 and 13. Council members were impressed by the planning for parking, traffic and security that went into the proposal, presented on Monday. "I was a doubting Thomas at the beginning of the process," said Councilman Robert D. Breton. "I thought (the swap meet) was dead on arrival.
NEWS
May 9, 1985 | SUE AVERY, Times Staff Writer
After two years of complaints from neighbors of the Edwards Drive-In Theater in unincorporated territory near Arcadia, the county has agreed to hold a public hearing to review a permit that allows the theater to conduct swap meets. The Regional Planning Commission hearing was requested by Supervisor Pete Schabarum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1994 | ERIC SLATER
The Pierce College Foundation has brought in a new company to run its weekly swap meet, but the meet will not open this week as planned. A contract with the new, nonprofit company Straight Talk, must be approved by the college's Board of Trustees. But approval was not sought in time due to a foundation "oversight," said foundation President James Breeden. "Hopefully we'll get it going sometime this month or in July," Breeden said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1990 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A $900,000 settlement was approved by a county panel Monday for an 11-year-old boy who has been comatose since February, 1985, when he climbed a fence at the San Fernando Swap Meet and was swept down a flood control channel. In a unanimous decision, the three-member Los Angeles County Claims Board conceded that although the county made various repairs to the fences along the Pacoima Wash, dirt and debris left stacked near a fence at the swap meet made it easy to scale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1993 | RICHARD CORE
Trustees of the Saddleback Community College District board have approved a proposal to operate a Saturday open-air market on the Saddleback campus. The board voted unanimously in favor of the proposal Monday. The market, proposed by the Saddleback College Foundation as a means of raising money, would be operated by Outdoor Marketplaces Inc. in Parking Lot 10. With the board's approval, the proposal now goes to the city of Mission Viejo's Planning Commission for consideration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2011 | SANDY BANKS
The Faith Dome at Crenshaw Christian Center was the perfect venue for Wednesday's For the People job fair initiative. It's not just that it holds 10,000 people -- and almost half of those seats were filled. It's that something more than logic and reason is required to stoke hope in times like these. The hopefuls began lining up along Vermont Avenue hours before the church doors opened for the job fair at 9 a.m. Men in pressed slacks and sports jackets, women with high heels peeking from their purses and flip-flops on their feet for standing.
SPORTS
July 31, 2011 | By Dylan Hernandez
For Dodgers fans, the non-waiver trade deadline Sunday was a cruel reminder of the once-proud franchise's place on baseball's landscape. Bankrupt and out of contention, the team was reduced to making minor deals, shipping Rafael Furcal to the St. Louis Cardinals to save $1.4 million and set up a two-month audition for shortstop prospect Dee Gordon. And this might be the worst part: the team Dodgers fans most hate put itself in position to once again bombard them with images of men with overgrown beards hoisting the World Series trophy and waving red thongs.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
Debbie Eldridge was lolling about her 40-foot-long Monaco Diplomat luxury motor home with her twin sister, Betty Hayden, cooling off with a Diet Pepsi after a marathon morning at the flea markets. Eldridge, 58, had reaped a modest haul — a dog toy for her beloved bichon, Boomer, and a decorative sun sculpture that she planned to display in the backyard of her real home in Merced, Calif. Hayden was sporting her newest acquisition: a pink fringed T-shirt that read, "Quartzsite, Arizona.
HOME & GARDEN
January 8, 2011 | By Lisa Boone, Los Angeles Times
When it came to remake their Laguna Beach house, Mark and Cindy Evans wanted to emulate the calm of California missions they loved while celebrating their favorite pastime: shopping flea markets. "I love the peaceful feel you get whenever you walk through a mission," Mark says. "It is completely different from anywhere else. " So is his house. Mark likes to joke that he and Cindy refer to themselves as the Flea Marketeers, adding with some hyperbole, "We're collectors as long as it's cheap.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2009 | Andrea Chang
Among heaps of antiques, collectibles and vintage clothing, frugal shoppers are rediscovering a recession-friendly place where prices are low and haggling is welcome. In growing numbers since the recession began 18 months ago, they are heading to one of about 135 flea markets and swap meets in California, including those at the Rose Bowl and in Long Beach and San Bernardino.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2009 | Susan King
The clever canine stars of the family comedy "Hotel for Dogs" had to learn more than sit, stay, fetch and play dead. They had to become adept at sitting on toilets, herding mechanical sheep and operating a vending machine filled with shoes. "It wasn't something that we could show up on the day and show the machine to the dogs," says trainer Mark Forbes, who also worked with the four-footed stars of "Marley & Me."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1992 | JODI WILGOREN
Bugs and beetles were crawling all over the Orange County Fairgrounds on Sunday. But hold the exterminator--these critters were on wheels, gathered for the seventh annual Volkswagen Jamboree, a car show and swap meet filled with nostalgia for automobiles that have not been sold new in the United States for more than a decade. Hoods were up and doors open to display rebuilt engines, jazzy interiors and sparkling paint jobs on vehicles with nicknames such as the Pink Panther and Rick's 66.
SPORTS
December 12, 1991
A look at Wednesday's trades at the winter meetings in Miami Beach. * The New York Mets traded outfielder Kevin McReynolds and infielders Keith Miller and Gregg Jefferies to the Kansas City Royals for pitcher Bret Saberhagen and infielder Bill Pecota. * The San Francisco Giants traded outfielder Kevin Mitchell and pitcher Mike Remlinger to the Seattle Mariners for pitchers Dave Burba, Mike Jackson and Bill Swift.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2008 | Esmeralda Bermudez, Times Staff Writer
Until recently, the golden cherubs and embellished pillars lining the walls of the Westlake Theatre swap meet meant little more than a fancy backdrop for Virginia Anaya and her busy vitamin and makeup business. This was the place where, decades earlier, Charlie Chaplin delighted audiences and Los Angeles' elite, the residents of the district's Spanish-style mansions and high-rise homes, gathered to relax with an evening of theater. Today, it is where Anaya sells laxatives and eye shadow to make a living.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2008 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
Seth Kaufman's artwork was a teacup. "I call it 'Teacup,' " the 49-year-old Torrance artist said with tongue-in-cheek solemnity. Then he lifted the piece from its stand, revealing that this cup had no bottom. "I have subverted the functionality of it by putting a hole in it and putting a glaze in the center that is sort of disgusting," he said, indicating the dirty black pattern that lined the white cup. "If you had a cup that functioned but looked like that, you wouldn't drink out of it.
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