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OPINION
March 18, 2014
Re "Finding liberty in hard labor," Column One, March 13 In 1911, 146 sweatshop workers - mostly women - burned to death in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City. This led to major protests, the beginning of safety regulations and the unionization of sweatshop workers in the United States. Now things are worse. In 2012, a sweatshop fire in Bangladesh killed 112 workers, and last year in the same country the collapse of another sweatshop killed more than 1,100 people.
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OPINION
April 22, 2014 | Doyle McManus
One year ago this week, the eight-story Rana Plaza garment factory collapsed in Bangladesh's capital city of Dhaka, killing 1,129 people. The building's top floors had been added illegally, and their weight caused the lower stories to buckle. Many of the victims were young women who had been sewing low-priced clothes for Western brands, earning a minimum wage of about $9 a week. It was the worst disaster in garment industry history. In the year since Rana Plaza, inspectors commissioned by U.S. and European clothing companies have scoured Dhaka, checking factories that supply brands to Western retailers.
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BOOKS
July 22, 1990
In response to the somewhat paranoiac article on the Southern Regional Library Facility by Ron Kelley, I must say that his idiosyncratic view of working conditions here at the library aside, I find his comparison of the working environment to a sweatshop incredibly self-serving and degrading to those who spend 12 and 14 hours a day, seven days a week, in the actual garment-industry sweatshops of New York and Los Angeles, for $2 an hour and under....
OPINION
March 18, 2014
Re "Finding liberty in hard labor," Column One, March 13 In 1911, 146 sweatshop workers - mostly women - burned to death in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City. This led to major protests, the beginning of safety regulations and the unionization of sweatshop workers in the United States. Now things are worse. In 2012, a sweatshop fire in Bangladesh killed 112 workers, and last year in the same country the collapse of another sweatshop killed more than 1,100 people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2001
Re "A Sweatshop Is Better Than Nothing," Commentary, April 25: Daniel Jacobs claims to see labor exploitation "through the eyes of those my money will benefit" rather than through the moral standards held by the "eyes of America." He is right and wrong. They are all the same eyes. Actually, Jacobs' desire is very consistent with both "the Western ideal of universal human rights" and American morality. It represents the latest manifestation of a long European and American tradition of making money by exploiting others--while calling the process charity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2005 | From Associated Press
Authorities are renewing their search for two men who evaded capture when authorities broke up a sweatshop ring in 1995 that held more than 70 Thai immigrants in slave-like conditions in a house in El Monte. The Aug.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1997 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite modifying a newspaper ad that drew objections from federal authorities, Guess Inc. has come under new criticism for continuing to claim that the company's garments are made by "100% sweatshop-free" contractors. California Labor Commissioner Jose Millan said the boast, which is made in both the company's new and original ads, is dubious given the widespread labor violations in Southern California's garment-making industry.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1996 | STUART SILVERSTEIN and GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Labor Department announced Friday that it will conduct a "thorough review" of Guess Inc. after finding that the controversial Los Angeles clothing company was receiving merchandise from an alleged large-scale sweatshop. Federal officials said they recently discovered Guess' ties to the alleged sweatshop, Chums Casual of Los Angeles, while reviewing Chums' subpoenaed sales records.
BUSINESS
August 2, 1998
I was dismayed to read in "Sweatshop Exhibit Has Nowhere to Go" [July 15] that the Smithsonian sweatshop exhibit will not be coming to Los Angeles because of garment industry pressure. It was an exhibit I was looking forward to since I can't afford to go to Washington, D.C., to see it. For Isle Metchek, executive director of the Los Angeles-based California Fashion Assn., to say that she feels vindicated is ridiculous. This is not the first time that atrocities have happened in the garment industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1995
Thank you, Julie Su (and the Skadden Fellowship you're working with), for making it possible to be proud of at least some people in the sorry El Monte sweatshop scandal (Sept. 4). When they had been saved from sweatshop slavery, only to face INS incarceration, thank you for working so hard to give these poor working women some of the freedom for which our country stands. And thank you too for returning some of the Thai-style hospitality to those workers. It's the same kind of hospitality many of us received as GIs in northeastern Thailand during the Vietnam War era. And my wife and I have received it each time we've returned to Thailand.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2012 | By Shan Li
Cheap-chic clothier Forever 21 is accused of being cheap to its workforce. The Labor Department said an investigation into the Los Angeles retailer uncovered evidence of "significant" violations of federal laws on minimum wage, overtime and record-keeping by vendors supplying the company. Now, the agency is trying to get their hands on data documenting wages, hours and employment practices at Forever 21's contractors and manufacturers. The Labor Department is trying to compel Forever 21 to comply with a subpoena handed down in August after the company refused to cooperate.
OPINION
July 19, 2012 | By Robert J.S. Ross
Ralph Lauren, the crown prince of preppy, received more than $30 million in compensation in 2011 from the corporation he founded and of which he and his family control about 73%. He is on the Forbes list of billionaires. The Ralph Lauren firm physically produces nothing: It is a design, marketing and licensing operation that hires factories to make its stuff. The company has had the U.S. Olympic team deal since 2008. A men's team shirt costs $425 and a woman's skirt $498. The beret that makes the athletes look like recruits for the U.S. Special Forces and a T-shirt each cost $55. Perhaps it is the high unemployment rate or the in-your-face patriotism induced by an election year, but the news that Lauren's prep-chic outfits are made in China has produced a rare bipartisan storm of criticism.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
They called it the zombie walk. After midnight, when the coffee and Red Bull had worn off, Sari Gennis and her co-workers would take a brisk stroll to make it through their graveyard shift. For four months straight, often seven days a week, a team of visual effects artists worked 12-hour shifts to complete the 3-D conversion of movie blockbuster "Titanic. " Gennis said the long hours aggravated a severe arthritis condition. She'd already had both knees replaced, and needed a third surgery, but couldn't afford to take time off for the operation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
For decades, Mike Silverman touted himself as "the Realtor to the stars," drawing swoons from the news media here and abroad both for his movie-star clientele and his movie-star looks. In his case, the nickname wasn't just a publicist's creation but a reflection of star-studded fact. He had catered to a seemingly endless string of A-list celebrities that started, according to Silverman, when he sold Frank Sinatra's house to Cary Grant. Silverman, who retired in 2001, died April 17 of congestive heart failure at his vacation home in Bellingham, Wash.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2010
SERIES The New Adventures of Old Christine: Christine (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) tells her therapist (Eric McCormack) that she is in love with him (8 p.m. CBS). Mercy: The hospital admits three promiscuous college students who have meningitis (8 p.m. NBC). American Idol: Auditions continue in Atlanta (8 p.m. Fox). Gary Unmarried: Sasha (Brooke D'Orsay) flirts with surfer Laird Hamilton in this new episode (8:30 p.m. CBS). The Middle: Mike (Neil Flynn)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2008 | Valerie J. Nelson
Al Meyerhoff, a prominent environmental and labor lawyer whose landmark cases included the 2002 settlement of a class-action lawsuit against some of America's biggest clothing retailers that alleged sweatshop abuses on the island of Saipan, has died. He was 61. Meyerhoff died Sunday of complications related to cancer at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, said his wife, Marcia Brandwynne.
SPORTS
November 7, 1987
When there's a problem, cut out the problem. So the Rams traded Eric Dickerson. But there's another problem that needs to be addressed: The Rams are still the cheapest sweatshop in the National Football League. Do the Rams expect to sign any of the players they'll draft in Dickerson's place? Not at their "bottom-of-the-barrel" salary level. Unless a new attitude comes about in Ram management, there'll be a lot of free agents next year. BOB LOWE San Diego
NEWS
January 12, 2003
Thank you for having the guts to publish "Levi Strauss and the Price We Pay" (by Fred Dickey, Dec. 1). Dickey did us all a great service by illuminating the full scope of globalization and our role in it as consumers. This article took all the pleasure out of buying cheap goods for me. Until our country develops a conscience and starts demanding fair working conditions and pay for those who toil in foreign countries, I will not buy these tainted goods. All of us should do the same. Simone Butler Los Angeles Philip A. Marineau and the rest of the executive team at Levi Strauss have done a great job in trashing Levi's brand image by moving its manufacturing to contracted sweatshop suppliers overseas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2008 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
Maliwan Clinton recalls her first taste of America with a shudder. In this fabled land of the free, she was enslaved behind razor wire and around-the-clock guards in an El Monte sweatshop, where she and more than 70 other Thai laborers were forced to work 18-hour days for what amounted to less than a dollar an hour.
OPINION
August 10, 2008
Re "A real heat shield for farmworkers," Opinion, Aug. 2 In what other industry but agriculture are workers in the 21st century still battling for a drink of water? Those growers who don't provide water to their farmworkers are criminally negligent and should be considered in the same class as slumlords and sweatshop owners. This is a side of the immigration issue that doesn't seem to concern anti-immigrant forces, which might consider how Americans treat some of those who do make it into our country.
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