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NEWS
December 15, 1988 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Buffeted by an icy north wind, a single blood-red rose stood in a jar to mark the spot along Stockholm's busiest thoroughfare where so many still stop and stare. Here, on the last February night of 1986, an unknown assassin shot and killed Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme. With him died a part of Scandinavia.
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NEWS
March 7, 2002 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Fadime Sahindal told police her life had been threatened, they gave her an alarm system. When she approached politicians for help, they told her to make peace with her parents. And when she appealed in television interviews for aid in escaping a death sentence imposed by her father after she refused an arranged marriage, she provoked sympathy among Swedes--whose more liberal outlook she shared--but little willingness to get involved in a family matter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1994 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Over the course of the past century and a half, the tradition of the Swedish fiddler fell victim to a triumvirate of scourges: piety, industry and modernity. Moralistic institutions decided that dancing was not a good idea. The industrial revolution replaced villages with cities. And phonographs squeezed live regional music out from community functions.
NEWS
May 10, 2001 | CANDACE A. WEDLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the 1950s and '60s, Americans clamored for sleek Scandinavian chairs, tables and sofas in teak and monochrome fabrics. Then, like too much of a good thing, the craze faded out. Some 30 years later, Scandinavia's back in style. Swedish design in particular, both vintage and new, is being sought by collectors and designers alike, and L.A. and environs has its share of specialty shops.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1999 | J.D. CONSIDINE, THE BALTIMORE SUN
To be perfectly honest, nobody in Drain sth is particularly happy with having to lug that little "sth" around. "Drain sth doesn't sound as nice as just Drain," says Flavia Canel, who plays guitar with the Swedish heavy rock quartet. "We thought Drain was perfect with our kind of music and our lyrics, because it's about, like, to empty yourself, empty your mind of your thoughts." Unfortunately for Canel and company, the name was already taken in America.
NEWS
January 1, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When you're one of 288,496 Johanssons in a country as small as Sweden, it's awfully hard to feel special. You get your neighbors' mail. You get lots of wrong numbers. Co-workers often can't remember if you're the tall, blond Sven Johansson who works in marketing or the one with similar attributes in accounting. And there's the annoyance of having no right to invoke a common name for your personal business or Web site because some other Johansson holds the trademark.
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
A British consultant recalled recently how Swedish delegates to an international economic conference that she attended in the 1950s were quickly dubbed "the quiet men" by other participants. "They arrived punctually, were always very polite and well-dressed but stuck together and rarely opened their mouths," said the consultant, Jean Phillips-Martinsson, who advises businesses on cultural stereotypes. "That was 30 years ago, and nothing has changed since."
NEWS
May 10, 2001 | CANDACE A. WEDLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the 1950s and '60s, Americans clamored for sleek Scandinavian chairs, tables and sofas in teak and monochrome fabrics. Then, like too much of a good thing, the craze faded out. Some 30 years later, Scandinavia's back in style. Swedish design in particular, both vintage and new, is being sought by collectors and designers alike, and L.A. and environs has its share of specialty shops.
NEWS
March 7, 2002 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Fadime Sahindal told police her life had been threatened, they gave her an alarm system. When she approached politicians for help, they told her to make peace with her parents. And when she appealed in television interviews for aid in escaping a death sentence imposed by her father after she refused an arranged marriage, she provoked sympathy among Swedes--whose more liberal outlook she shared--but little willingness to get involved in a family matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
In "The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest," the final book in the late Stieg Larsson's international bestselling Millennium Trilogy, the Swedish author torques up the mental chess and tones down the action. And so it is in the film from director Daniel Alfredson, who delivers an extremely satisfying ending to the story of Lisbeth Salander, the tough Swedish cyber punk that actress Noomi Rapace has turned into an iconic New Age heroine. Alfredson, who picked up directing duties with the second installment, "The Girl Who Played With Fire," uses the tonal switch to get us far closer to the enigma of a character so burned by life, so darkly brooding, that she keeps human connections and communication to a maddening minimum.
NEWS
January 1, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When you're one of 288,496 Johanssons in a country as small as Sweden, it's awfully hard to feel special. You get your neighbors' mail. You get lots of wrong numbers. Co-workers often can't remember if you're the tall, blond Sven Johansson who works in marketing or the one with similar attributes in accounting. And there's the annoyance of having no right to invoke a common name for your personal business or Web site because some other Johansson holds the trademark.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1999 | J.D. CONSIDINE, THE BALTIMORE SUN
To be perfectly honest, nobody in Drain sth is particularly happy with having to lug that little "sth" around. "Drain sth doesn't sound as nice as just Drain," says Flavia Canel, who plays guitar with the Swedish heavy rock quartet. "We thought Drain was perfect with our kind of music and our lyrics, because it's about, like, to empty yourself, empty your mind of your thoughts." Unfortunately for Canel and company, the name was already taken in America.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1994 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Over the course of the past century and a half, the tradition of the Swedish fiddler fell victim to a triumvirate of scourges: piety, industry and modernity. Moralistic institutions decided that dancing was not a good idea. The industrial revolution replaced villages with cities. And phonographs squeezed live regional music out from community functions.
NEWS
December 15, 1988 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Buffeted by an icy north wind, a single blood-red rose stood in a jar to mark the spot along Stockholm's busiest thoroughfare where so many still stop and stare. Here, on the last February night of 1986, an unknown assassin shot and killed Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme. With him died a part of Scandinavia.
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
A British consultant recalled recently how Swedish delegates to an international economic conference that she attended in the 1950s were quickly dubbed "the quiet men" by other participants. "They arrived punctually, were always very polite and well-dressed but stuck together and rarely opened their mouths," said the consultant, Jean Phillips-Martinsson, who advises businesses on cultural stereotypes. "That was 30 years ago, and nothing has changed since."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2006 | Elaine G. Harp, Special to The Times
THE Vikings, renowned for their sagas, are again making landfall on our shores, this time in mystery novels by such outstanding Scandinavian authors as Peter Hoeg, Karin Fossum, Jan Kjaerstad, Ake Edwardson and Arnaldur Indridason. Although their books have long been popular abroad, the well-translated ones have only caught on in America since the mid-'90s.
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