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BUSINESS
September 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
Citizens of eight West European countries, led by Switzerland, earned more than Americans in 1988, according to figures made available by the World Bank on Friday. Switzerland's per-capita income last year was $20,130, while in the United States per capita income was $14,080. The others ahead of the United States: Luxembourg, $19,960; Sweden, $17,160; Iceland, $16,480; West Germany, $15,880; Norway, $15,250; Denmark, $14,530 and France, $14,130.
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BUSINESS
April 9, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
COPENHAGEN It's been 7,000 years since receding glaciers cleaved Denmark from the Scandinavian Peninsula, but the region united by similar languages, culture and economic values is about to get physical again. A huge suspension-bridge-and-tunnel complex that has been almost a decade in the making opens July 1 to rail and vehicle traffic, linking the peninsula with Western Europe for the first time since the ice melted.
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BUSINESS
September 11, 1992 | TOM PETRUNO
In the midst of a horrendous new battle over currency values and interest rates in Europe, the view from American financial markets boils down to this: We win no matter what--so let somebody else take the bullet. The "somebodies" in this case may turn out to be the poor Swedes, all 8.5 million of them.
BUSINESS
September 11, 1992 | TOM PETRUNO
In the midst of a horrendous new battle over currency values and interest rates in Europe, the view from American financial markets boils down to this: We win no matter what--so let somebody else take the bullet. The "somebodies" in this case may turn out to be the poor Swedes, all 8.5 million of them.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sweden's political crisis worsened when Finance Minister Kjell-Olof Feldt, who tried to trim a lavish welfare state with free-market policies, resigned amid efforts to form a new government. Feldt's announcement in Stockholm followed the resignation Thursday of Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson's Social Democratic minority government, defeated in Parliament over an economic austerity package.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson resigned after Parliament rejected his Social Democratic government's stiff measures aimed at ending strikes and controlling inflation. The action threw the country into a political crisis. Carlsson gave his government's resignation to Speaker Thage G. Peterson, who remained head of a caretaker Cabinet. Analysts said the most likely outcome would be a reconstituted Social Democratic government with tacit support of the Communists.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Swedish Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson said the economy is "falling apart" and that his government will resign unless Parliament bans strikes and imposes a wage-price freeze for two years. The plan also would put a two-year freeze on local taxes, rents and stock dividends. Some opposition lawmakers accused Carlsson's Social Democrats of declaring economic martial law and advocating a planned economy when Eastern Europe is abandoning that approach.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
COPENHAGEN It's been 7,000 years since receding glaciers cleaved Denmark from the Scandinavian Peninsula, but the region united by similar languages, culture and economic values is about to get physical again. A huge suspension-bridge-and-tunnel complex that has been almost a decade in the making opens July 1 to rail and vehicle traffic, linking the peninsula with Western Europe for the first time since the ice melted.
NEWS
September 16, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sweden's Social Democratic Party, founders of Europe's model welfare state, suffered its worst defeat in 60 years to center-right parties in parliamentary elections Sunday. Soon after the polls closed and after Swedish television broadcast computer projections of results, Social Democratic Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson said his government will resign today.
NEWS
September 16, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sweden's Social Democratic Party, founders of Europe's model welfare state, suffered its worst defeat in 60 years to center-right parties in parliamentary elections Sunday. Soon after the polls closed and after Swedish television broadcast computer projections of results, Social Democratic Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson said his government will resign today.
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | From Associated Press
Caretaker Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson said Friday that he is forming a new government to end Sweden's political crisis and to quell the labor strife and inflation that have beset the economy. Carlsson, from the Social Democratic Labor Party, said the government will consider opening Sweden to workers from the Soviet Baltic republics to alleviate an inflation-boosting labor shortage and will seek to mediate labor disputes.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sweden's political crisis worsened when Finance Minister Kjell-Olof Feldt, who tried to trim a lavish welfare state with free-market policies, resigned amid efforts to form a new government. Feldt's announcement in Stockholm followed the resignation Thursday of Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson's Social Democratic minority government, defeated in Parliament over an economic austerity package.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson resigned after Parliament rejected his Social Democratic government's stiff measures aimed at ending strikes and controlling inflation. The action threw the country into a political crisis. Carlsson gave his government's resignation to Speaker Thage G. Peterson, who remained head of a caretaker Cabinet. Analysts said the most likely outcome would be a reconstituted Social Democratic government with tacit support of the Communists.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Swedish Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson said the economy is "falling apart" and that his government will resign unless Parliament bans strikes and imposes a wage-price freeze for two years. The plan also would put a two-year freeze on local taxes, rents and stock dividends. Some opposition lawmakers accused Carlsson's Social Democrats of declaring economic martial law and advocating a planned economy when Eastern Europe is abandoning that approach.
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | From Associated Press
Caretaker Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson said Friday that he is forming a new government to end Sweden's political crisis and to quell the labor strife and inflation that have beset the economy. Carlsson, from the Social Democratic Labor Party, said the government will consider opening Sweden to workers from the Soviet Baltic republics to alleviate an inflation-boosting labor shortage and will seek to mediate labor disputes.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | BENGT LJUNG, United Press International
Swedes may not love the tax man, but they wouldn't dream of revolting against the highest tax rate in the world. On the contrary, most dutifully believe in paying their share of maintaining the welfare state. Like everyone else, the 8.4 million Swedes have an aversion to parting with their money. Yet 62% said in a recent study that they were only paying their fair share for the country's exhaustive social services.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
Citizens of eight West European countries, led by Switzerland, earned more than Americans in 1988, according to figures made available by the World Bank on Friday. Switzerland's per-capita income last year was $20,130, while in the United States per capita income was $14,080. The others ahead of the United States: Luxembourg, $19,960; Sweden, $17,160; Iceland, $16,480; West Germany, $15,880; Norway, $15,250; Denmark, $14,530 and France, $14,130.
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