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Sweden Elections

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NEWS
September 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The political party that built Sweden's high-tax welfare state and governed the nation for most of the past seven decades got its lowest support in national elections but was likely to retain power. With votes counted from all precincts, the Social Democrats had 36.6% of the vote, a steep plunge from the 45% they got four years ago and far short of the majority needed to govern without support from other parties.
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NEWS
September 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The political party that built Sweden's high-tax welfare state and governed the nation for most of the past seven decades got its lowest support in national elections but was likely to retain power. With votes counted from all precincts, the Social Democrats had 36.6% of the vote, a steep plunge from the 45% they got four years ago and far short of the majority needed to govern without support from other parties.
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NEWS
September 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson resigned after his long-ruling Social Democratic Party suffered its biggest defeat since the 1920s in Sunday's election. But formation of a new government was clouded by division within the victorious center-right coalition that failed to win a parliamentary majority. Carlsson was asked to stay on as caretaker prime minister. The coalition of Conservatives, Liberals, Center Party and Christian Democrats won 47.1% of the vote.
NEWS
September 20, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven parties spanning the political spectrum are expected to win parliamentary seats in today's general election, but not one can offer what voters really want: a return to Sweden's glory days as the world's model welfare state. In fact, right-leaning forces have brazenly stated that the cherished ideal of equal wealth for everyone is not just out of reach but out of fashion.
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Sweden's ruling Social Democrats won enough support to maintain their minority government in a national election Sunday that also brought the environmentalist Greens into Parliament for the first time. After a campaign dominated by environmental issues, the Greens won 20 seats in the 349-seat Swedish Parliament to become the first new legislative party here since 1917.
NEWS
September 16, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sweden's Social Democratic Party, founders of Europe's model welfare state, suffered its worst defeat in 60 years to center-right parties in parliamentary elections Sunday. Soon after the polls closed and after Swedish television broadcast computer projections of results, Social Democratic Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson said his government will resign today.
NEWS
November 14, 1994 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the end of a long and intensely emotional campaign, Sweden on Sunday voted solidly in favor of abandoning its Arctic isolation and joining the European Union. Sweden's approval follows similar yes votes in Austria and Finland this year and is expected to give a boost to a referendum at the end of the month in neighboring Norway, where opposition has been strong.
NEWS
September 20, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven parties spanning the political spectrum are expected to win parliamentary seats in today's general election, but not one can offer what voters really want: a return to Sweden's glory days as the world's model welfare state. In fact, right-leaning forces have brazenly stated that the cherished ideal of equal wealth for everyone is not just out of reach but out of fashion.
NEWS
September 13, 1994
After three years of cutting back Sweden's legendary social welfare program, Prime Minister Carl Bildt leads his center-right coalition into national elections Sunday nursing only slim hopes of winning a new mandate to continue the job. As campaigning entered its final days, polls showed the four government parties still trailing the opposition Social Democrats, although there were signs the gap was narrowing slightly.
NEWS
September 16, 1985 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Prime Minister Olof Palme and his Social Democratic Party, turning back a strong challenge from parties demanding lower taxes and less spending, won reelection Sunday with a narrow victory in Sweden's parliamentary elections. According to nearly complete returns reported by Swedish television, the Social Democrats won 44.9% of the votes and 159 seats in the Parliament.
NEWS
November 14, 1994 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the end of a long and intensely emotional campaign, Sweden on Sunday voted solidly in favor of abandoning its Arctic isolation and joining the European Union. Sweden's approval follows similar yes votes in Austria and Finland this year and is expected to give a boost to a referendum at the end of the month in neighboring Norway, where opposition has been strong.
NEWS
September 13, 1994
After three years of cutting back Sweden's legendary social welfare program, Prime Minister Carl Bildt leads his center-right coalition into national elections Sunday nursing only slim hopes of winning a new mandate to continue the job. As campaigning entered its final days, polls showed the four government parties still trailing the opposition Social Democrats, although there were signs the gap was narrowing slightly.
NEWS
September 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson resigned after his long-ruling Social Democratic Party suffered its biggest defeat since the 1920s in Sunday's election. But formation of a new government was clouded by division within the victorious center-right coalition that failed to win a parliamentary majority. Carlsson was asked to stay on as caretaker prime minister. The coalition of Conservatives, Liberals, Center Party and Christian Democrats won 47.1% of the vote.
NEWS
September 16, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sweden's Social Democratic Party, founders of Europe's model welfare state, suffered its worst defeat in 60 years to center-right parties in parliamentary elections Sunday. Soon after the polls closed and after Swedish television broadcast computer projections of results, Social Democratic Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson said his government will resign today.
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Sweden's ruling Social Democrats won enough support to maintain their minority government in a national election Sunday that also brought the environmentalist Greens into Parliament for the first time. After a campaign dominated by environmental issues, the Greens won 20 seats in the 349-seat Swedish Parliament to become the first new legislative party here since 1917.
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