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NEWS
January 13, 2001 | Associated Press
Investigators studying the fate of Raoul Wallenberg left open the possibility Friday that the prominent diplomat did not die in a Soviet prison in 1947, and they implied that Swedish officials did not do enough to save him. A 362-page report by a Swedish-Russian panel set up in 1991 left many unanswered questions about the Swedish diplomat revered for helping tens of thousands of Jews escape Nazi-occupied Hungary.
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NEWS
January 13, 2001 | Associated Press
Investigators studying the fate of Raoul Wallenberg left open the possibility Friday that the prominent diplomat did not die in a Soviet prison in 1947, and they implied that Swedish officials did not do enough to save him. A 362-page report by a Swedish-Russian panel set up in 1991 left many unanswered questions about the Swedish diplomat revered for helping tens of thousands of Jews escape Nazi-occupied Hungary.
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NEWS
May 12, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Baltic Sea had no Homer to chronicle its ancient wars and tempests. In modern times, it is often dismissed as the backwater of Northern Europe. But historic dramas on the Continent have always washed up on its shores, and with fateful consequences. Today, the political and economic convulsions shaking the Soviet Union have provided an opportunity for Lithuania, one of the three Baltic states absorbed by the Soviets in 1940, to declare its independence.
NEWS
January 4, 2001 | Reuters
The Soviet Union was willing to trade captured Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg after World War II for Soviet citizens who had defected to Sweden, but Stockholm turned down the offer, a Swedish newspaper said Wednesday. Wallenberg, credited with saving thousands of Jews in Hungary from Nazi death camps by granting them protection under the neutral Swedish flag or by issuing false passports, was last seen when he was arrested in 1945 by Soviet troops in Budapest, the capital.
NEWS
June 27, 1987 | From Reuters
A Moscow street is to be named after slain Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme, the newspaper Moskovskaya Pravda said Friday. It said a passageway in the Lenin Hills area of the Soviet capital would be named in honor of Palme, who was shot dead in Stockholm in February, 1986. His killer remains unknown.
NEWS
April 29, 1989 | From Reuters
The Soviet Union has a poor record on combatting pollution but plans to double environmental spending and sharply cut harmful emissions over northern Europe, the Soviet environmental protection minister said Friday. Signing a five-year environmental cooperation agreement with Sweden, Fyodor T. Morgun sharply criticized his country's past record in the ecological field. "We criticize ourselves because many European countries and the United States allocate twice as much money as we did and do in the Soviet Union to the environment," Morgun told a news conference.
NEWS
April 24, 1987 | Associated Press
A Swedish jet fighter accidentally violated Soviet airspace Wednesday and the Foreign Ministry promptly apologized, a Swedish defense staff official said Thursday.
NEWS
July 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
A Soviet teen-ager who hijacked a domestic Soviet airliner to Sweden by threatening the pilot with a fake hand grenade was extradited to the Soviet Union on Tuesday. Dmitri Semyonov was believed the first person extradited from Sweden to the Soviet Union since the end of World War II, when some Baltic refugees were sent back. The Soviets claimed the refugees were Nazi sympathizers.
NEWS
August 18, 1987
A Soviet official conceded it was theoretically possible that a Soviet underground nuclear test could have caused slightly higher radioactivity over Sweden, but he said it was highly unlikely. Yuri Izrael, head of the Soviet Meteorological Service, told a news conference in Moscow there was no proof linking an Aug. 2 underground test on Novaya Zemlya island to the "infinitesimally small" increase of radioactivity in Sweden's atmosphere.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | From Associated Press
KGB chief Vladimir V. Bakatin on Wednesday presented new documents on the missing Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg to the Swedish ambassador in Moscow, an embassy official said. Bakatin, a reformer who was appointed to the job after last month's coup, reportedly said the documents only confirm the "previously existing" version of Wallenberg's death. Wallenberg is credited with saving tens of thousands of Hungarian Jews from the Nazis during World War II.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | Associated Press
Soviet Foreign Minister Boris D. Pankin promised Wednesday that he will reduce KGB staffs in embassies and investigate submarine intrusions into Swedish territory. The number of agents working abroad for the secret agency will be cut "to the lowest minimum required by our security interests," Pankin told a news conference. Swedish security police have estimated that a third of the diplomats at the Soviet Embassy in Stockholm have been linked to the KGB.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | From Associated Press
KGB chief Vladimir V. Bakatin on Wednesday presented new documents on the missing Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg to the Swedish ambassador in Moscow, an embassy official said. Bakatin, a reformer who was appointed to the job after last month's coup, reportedly said the documents only confirm the "previously existing" version of Wallenberg's death. Wallenberg is credited with saving tens of thousands of Hungarian Jews from the Nazis during World War II.
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At an air base in Eastern Europe, Hungarian officials not long ago were startled to see Soviet airmen painting out the Soviet air force's camouflage markings on SU-24 Fencer long-range attack aircraft and painting on the gray-and-white colors of the Soviet navy.
NEWS
July 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
A Soviet teen-ager who hijacked a domestic Soviet airliner to Sweden by threatening the pilot with a fake hand grenade was extradited to the Soviet Union on Tuesday. Dmitri Semyonov was believed the first person extradited from Sweden to the Soviet Union since the end of World War II, when some Baltic refugees were sent back. The Soviets claimed the refugees were Nazi sympathizers.
NEWS
May 12, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Baltic Sea had no Homer to chronicle its ancient wars and tempests. In modern times, it is often dismissed as the backwater of Northern Europe. But historic dramas on the Continent have always washed up on its shores, and with fateful consequences. Today, the political and economic convulsions shaking the Soviet Union have provided an opportunity for Lithuania, one of the three Baltic states absorbed by the Soviets in 1940, to declare its independence.
NEWS
August 15, 1989 | From Reuters
The Soviet Union has invited relatives of the disappeared Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg to Moscow amid signs it may at last be prepared to clear up the fate of the man credited with saving tens of thousands of Jews during World War II. The invitation was handed to the Raoul Wallenberg Assn. in Stockholm last week by Soviet Ambassador Boris Pankin, association chairman Per Anger said Monday.
NEWS
January 4, 2001 | Reuters
The Soviet Union was willing to trade captured Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg after World War II for Soviet citizens who had defected to Sweden, but Stockholm turned down the offer, a Swedish newspaper said Wednesday. Wallenberg, credited with saving thousands of Jews in Hungary from Nazi death camps by granting them protection under the neutral Swedish flag or by issuing false passports, was last seen when he was arrested in 1945 by Soviet troops in Budapest, the capital.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | Associated Press
Soviet Foreign Minister Boris D. Pankin promised Wednesday that he will reduce KGB staffs in embassies and investigate submarine intrusions into Swedish territory. The number of agents working abroad for the secret agency will be cut "to the lowest minimum required by our security interests," Pankin told a news conference. Swedish security police have estimated that a third of the diplomats at the Soviet Embassy in Stockholm have been linked to the KGB.
NEWS
April 29, 1989 | From Reuters
The Soviet Union has a poor record on combatting pollution but plans to double environmental spending and sharply cut harmful emissions over northern Europe, the Soviet environmental protection minister said Friday. Signing a five-year environmental cooperation agreement with Sweden, Fyodor T. Morgun sharply criticized his country's past record in the ecological field. "We criticize ourselves because many European countries and the United States allocate twice as much money as we did and do in the Soviet Union to the environment," Morgun told a news conference.
NEWS
January 12, 1988
The prime ministers of Sweden and the Soviet Union emerged from a four-hour meeting in Stockholm to say they are still hopeful of settling a 19-year-old dispute over territorial waters in the Baltic Sea, which Sweden says is blocking relations with Moscow. "The talks are going well. Wait a little longer," said Soviet Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov after the meeting with Swedish leader Ingvar Carlsson. It was the first high-level Soviet visit in 15 years.
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