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NEWS
September 2, 1997 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one could have known, of course. But the view all these years from Maria Nordin's balcony has been a bittersweet reminder of the life she so much wanted but was never allowed to have. The blessing is that her failing blue eyes--at the center of her awful story that began 54 years ago--now prevent her from seeing more than a few yards away. The playground five stories below, with children dangling from tire swings and mothers trading neighborhood gossip, mercifully is beyond her sight.
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NEWS
March 19, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Ruth Dreifuss, who served last year as Switzerland's first Jewish or woman president, warned in a newspaper interview against a "creeping acceptance" of anti-Semitism in the country. Dreifuss, a Social Democrat who held the rotating presidency last year, said a survey that found anti-Semitic tendencies in a major nationalist party was cause for concern, according to the Tages-Anzeiger. The U.S.-sponsored survey, released Wednesday, indicated that many Swiss reject anti-Semitism.
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NEWS
November 14, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Swedes voted in 1980 to shutter their nuclear power plants, their decision helped set the pace for judgments across Europe that the energy source, though limitless and affordable, posed too great a risk for the densely populated Continent. But the environmental trailblazers have lost their way. Eighteen years after the referendum that condemned this country's 12 reactors to the ash heap of industrial history, the full dozen are up and running past one closure deadline after another.
NEWS
March 5, 1999 | Reuters
The Swedish government moved closer Thursday to approving compensation of $21,150 each to victims of a 40-year Nazi-style program during which thousands were sterilized against their will. The Social Affairs Ministry said it had approved a draft on compensation and turned it over to lawyers to iron out the final details.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sweden's political crisis worsened when Finance Minister Kjell-Olof Feldt, who tried to trim a lavish welfare state with free-market policies, resigned amid efforts to form a new government. Feldt's announcement in Stockholm followed the resignation Thursday of Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson's Social Democratic minority government, defeated in Parliament over an economic austerity package.
NEWS
March 3, 1988
The Swedish government proposed a timetable for closing the country's 12 nuclear reactors, taking the first tentative step toward a non-nuclear future. Energy Minister Birgitta Dahl told a news conference in Stockholm that the first reactor will close in 1995, a second the next year and the remaining 10 by 2010. The proposals by the ruling Social Democrats were certain to have the approval of Parliament, political sources said.
NEWS
September 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson resigned after his long-ruling Social Democratic Party suffered its biggest defeat since the 1920s in Sunday's election. But formation of a new government was clouded by division within the victorious center-right coalition that failed to win a parliamentary majority. Carlsson was asked to stay on as caretaker prime minister. The coalition of Conservatives, Liberals, Center Party and Christian Democrats won 47.1% of the vote.
NEWS
May 5, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Lennart and Birgitta Berglund imagine those horrible last moments in the raging Baltic Sea, they like to think Birgitta's parents met death's cold advance in the warmth of each other's arms. Maybe the vacationing couple stayed behind in their cabin as the crippled ferry Estonia flipped on its side and was sucked from the horizon. And maybe they are still there--locked in their final embrace 250 feet beneath the sea. "But we are realistic," Lennart Berglund said.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1992 | From Reuters
A government panel will meet today to scrutinize the proposed merger of auto maker Volvo and food and drugs group Procordia, but it may not be able to stop the controversial $6.7-billion deal. Sweden's center-right government, which controls 42.7% of Procordia's voting stock, appeared wary of the deal, which threatens to complicate plans to sell state holdings in industry to the general public and employees.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Swedish Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson said the economy is "falling apart" and that his government will resign unless Parliament bans strikes and imposes a wage-price freeze for two years. The plan also would put a two-year freeze on local taxes, rents and stock dividends. Some opposition lawmakers accused Carlsson's Social Democrats of declaring economic martial law and advocating a planned economy when Eastern Europe is abandoning that approach.
NEWS
November 14, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Swedes voted in 1980 to shutter their nuclear power plants, their decision helped set the pace for judgments across Europe that the energy source, though limitless and affordable, posed too great a risk for the densely populated Continent. But the environmental trailblazers have lost their way. Eighteen years after the referendum that condemned this country's 12 reactors to the ash heap of industrial history, the full dozen are up and running past one closure deadline after another.
NEWS
September 20, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven parties spanning the political spectrum are expected to win parliamentary seats in today's general election, but not one can offer what voters really want: a return to Sweden's glory days as the world's model welfare state. In fact, right-leaning forces have brazenly stated that the cherished ideal of equal wealth for everyone is not just out of reach but out of fashion.
NEWS
September 2, 1997 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one could have known, of course. But the view all these years from Maria Nordin's balcony has been a bittersweet reminder of the life she so much wanted but was never allowed to have. The blessing is that her failing blue eyes--at the center of her awful story that began 54 years ago--now prevent her from seeing more than a few yards away. The playground five stories below, with children dangling from tire swings and mothers trading neighborhood gossip, mercifully is beyond her sight.
NEWS
May 5, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Lennart and Birgitta Berglund imagine those horrible last moments in the raging Baltic Sea, they like to think Birgitta's parents met death's cold advance in the warmth of each other's arms. Maybe the vacationing couple stayed behind in their cabin as the crippled ferry Estonia flipped on its side and was sucked from the horizon. And maybe they are still there--locked in their final embrace 250 feet beneath the sea. "But we are realistic," Lennart Berglund said.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1992 | From Reuters
A government panel will meet today to scrutinize the proposed merger of auto maker Volvo and food and drugs group Procordia, but it may not be able to stop the controversial $6.7-billion deal. Sweden's center-right government, which controls 42.7% of Procordia's voting stock, appeared wary of the deal, which threatens to complicate plans to sell state holdings in industry to the general public and employees.
NEWS
September 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson resigned after his long-ruling Social Democratic Party suffered its biggest defeat since the 1920s in Sunday's election. But formation of a new government was clouded by division within the victorious center-right coalition that failed to win a parliamentary majority. Carlsson was asked to stay on as caretaker prime minister. The coalition of Conservatives, Liberals, Center Party and Christian Democrats won 47.1% of the vote.
NEWS
December 15, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Only once, a thousand years ago during the Viking period, did a Nordic influence briefly dominate, with Scandinavian warriors ranging from the East Coast of North America--500 years before Christopher Columbus--to the Black and Caspian seas. The Norse admiringly described the attacking frenzies of their finest warriors as a state of being "berserk"--a Norse word absorbed into English. The Vikings also gave the name "Russ" to the Slavs who later adopted it for themselves as Russian.
NEWS
November 30, 1990 | Reuters
American deserters from a Persian Gulf war will not be given asylum in neutral Sweden, unlike deserters from the Vietnam War a generation ago, Sweden's Foreign Ministry said Thursday. Sweden rejected a request by the German Greens party to accept U.S. soldiers now in Germany who wish to desert. And it would not accept deserters from a U.N.-sanctioned war in the gulf, spokeswoman Birgitta Ahlen said.
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | From Associated Press
Caretaker Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson said Friday that he is forming a new government to end Sweden's political crisis and to quell the labor strife and inflation that have beset the economy. Carlsson, from the Social Democratic Labor Party, said the government will consider opening Sweden to workers from the Soviet Baltic republics to alleviate an inflation-boosting labor shortage and will seek to mediate labor disputes.
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