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March 7, 1988 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
Like Britain's National Health Service, Sweden's medical system has long been regarded as a model of socialized health care. But now officials here also are looking to private care to help meet some of the health needs of the nation's 8.4 million people. The government for the first time has agreed to contract with private hospitals in Stockholm and Goteborg to do cataract, heart bypass and hip replacement operations in order to reduce the waiting time in government hospitals.
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NEWS
March 7, 1988 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
Like Britain's National Health Service, Sweden's medical system has long been regarded as a model of socialized health care. But now officials here also are looking to private care to help meet some of the health needs of the nation's 8.4 million people. The government for the first time has agreed to contract with private hospitals in Stockholm and Goteborg to do cataract, heart bypass and hip replacement operations in order to reduce the waiting time in government hospitals.
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NEWS
May 23, 1999 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Medications banned or highly restricted in the United States because of severe, and sometimes fatal, side effects are being smuggled in from Mexico and peddled out of back-room shops across Southern California. These potentially dangerous drugs, which multinational pharmaceutical companies market in Mexico, where regulations and enforcement are less stringent, have shown up consistently in more than 70 raids over the last year of markets, dress shops and swap meets catering to Latino immigrants.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2002 | Reuters
U.S. regulators are investigating whether Schering-Plough Corp.'s allergy drug Claritin may be linked to birth defects reported in Sweden, a health official said. Swedish authorities have noted a higher-than-expected number of cases of hypospadia, a malformation of the penis, among children whose mothers took Claritin while pregnant. European authorities announced Thursday they had launched a safety investigation at Sweden's request. The defect can be corrected through surgery. Dr.
NEWS
September 6, 1998 | SUE LEEMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It was the early hours of July 5, 1948, and Doris White was rejoicing over the birth of her daughter. But she had an extra reason to celebrate: Thanks to Britain's brand new free-to-all state health system, her hospital stay would cost her nothing. "My mother is very fond of telling me how, during her labor, she drove all the nurses mad by asking what the time was," says her daughter, Susan Sewell.
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