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NEWS
February 13, 1987
Sweden rejected a request from the Simon Wiesenthal Center for Holocaust Studies in Los Angeles to take action against 12 people who allegedly committed war crimes during World War II. The government said in a statement that it had examined the center's charges about 12 people of Baltic origin. It found that only four were alive and that the period of prosecution had expired.
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NEWS
February 13, 1987
Sweden rejected a request from the Simon Wiesenthal Center for Holocaust Studies in Los Angeles to take action against 12 people who allegedly committed war crimes during World War II. The government said in a statement that it had examined the center's charges about 12 people of Baltic origin. It found that only four were alive and that the period of prosecution had expired.
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NEWS
May 30, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
A firebomb was thrown at a motel occupied by refugees early today, the eighth such attack in a week of violence against Sweden's liberal immigration policy. The homemade device caused no damage or injury but spread alarm among the 114 refugees at the motel outside the southern town of Gothenburg, the motel's night watchman said.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
If you saw Old Fred and didn't know him you would think he was one of the legion of America's homeless, a drifter perhaps. But you can't always tell a book by its cover. Fred Litzner--known to everyone in this area as Old Fred--wears a well-worn flannel shirt, old trousers, a seedy black coat and faded black hat, walks with a cane and always carries a shopping bag. His get-up belies his standing as an extraordinary historian.
WORLD
July 13, 2008 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Naseir's daughter was 7 when a local gang leader saw her on a Baghdad street and passed on the word: She was beautiful, and in a year or two, the man would take her as his wife. Until then, she would need to begin wearing a veil when she went out playing, and practice the principles of Islam, even though she wasn't Muslim. To Naseir, this meant two things. One: "Basically, he was talking about raping my daughter." And two: "We had to get out of there."
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