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Sweden Industry

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NEWS
January 26, 1992 | From Associated Press
In one of Sweden's biggest mergers, the Volvo automobile manufacturer plans to merge with Procordia, a major food and pharmaceuticals group, officials said Saturday. Company officers intend to realize the merger through a public offering by Procordia to Volvo's shareholders. But the government Privatization Commission, set up recently to oversee the privatization of state-owned companies, has yet to recommend the move.
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NEWS
January 26, 1992 | From Associated Press
In one of Sweden's biggest mergers, the Volvo automobile manufacturer plans to merge with Procordia, a major food and pharmaceuticals group, officials said Saturday. Company officers intend to realize the merger through a public offering by Procordia to Volvo's shareholders. But the government Privatization Commission, set up recently to oversee the privatization of state-owned companies, has yet to recommend the move.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2002 | KEVIN BRONSON
The game: Swedish rock and pop. Marquee players: The Soundtrack of Our Lives, a psych-rock sextet that last month won best artist at the Swedish Grammis (and which appears Tuesday at the Roxy in West Hollywood). Unlikely cheerleaders: Parasol Records, a Midwestern independent label and mail-order house. Parasol has been touting TSOOL since last summer, when it landed U.S. distribution rights from the band's Swedish label, Telegram/Warner. Mostly through www.parasol.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1988 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Ralph Waldo Emerson called him "a colossal soul (who) lies vast abroad on his times . . . and requires a long focal distance to be seen." Jorge Luis Borges claimed that "he would see/That which earthly eyes do not see:/The fierce geometry, the crystal/Labyrinth of God and the sordid/Milling of infernal delights." So enormous was the scientific and spiritual opus of Emanuel Swedenborg that not even the most exalting of Borgesian verse could exaggerate his visionary work.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1986 | Harry Bernstein
Perched comfortably on a chair in his office, his legs curled under his slim body, Olof Palme restlessly puffed away on yet another cigarette one day about 10 years ago as he intently but happily described his paradoxical country to me and my wife, Joanne. The prime minister of Sweden, who was assassinated in Stockholm on Feb. 28, generously had agreed to meet alone with us for a few minutes during our visit to the Swedish capital to study labor relations there.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2010 | By Margot Roosevelt
If the United States is at a loss over what to do about nuclear waste, it may be time to check out the Swedish model. A symposium at the annual meeting of the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science in San Diego last week highlighted the Swedish power industry in gaining public support for a geological repository for high-level radioactive waste. The Scandinavian success comes in stark contrast to efforts in the U.S., where spent nuclear fuel rods have remained for decades in temporary storage at power plants around the country.
NEWS
November 14, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Swedes voted in 1980 to shutter their nuclear power plants, their decision helped set the pace for judgments across Europe that the energy source, though limitless and affordable, posed too great a risk for the densely populated Continent. But the environmental trailblazers have lost their way. Eighteen years after the referendum that condemned this country's 12 reactors to the ash heap of industrial history, the full dozen are up and running past one closure deadline after another.
NEWS
April 17, 1988 | ROLF SODERLIND, United Press International
Sweden, the self-styled disarmament champion, is tightening controls on weapons exports to deal with its embarrassing new image as an international gunrunner. Stockholm's independent International Peace Research Institute says the country ranks eighth in the world among arms exporters. One expert says that Swedish arms were sold to combatants in 63 of the 107 international conflicts between 1950 and 1983. Not all of the sales were legal.
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