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NEWS
December 2, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has been more than two years since 36-year-old Ferdi Rutenfrans lost his last paying job, cataloguing books at the Amsterdam public library. "I wasn't exactly fired," he said. But he didn't exactly quit either. He chafed under what he calls the library's "hierarchical" organization. "I had words with my employer," and the next thing he knew he had joined the sizable ranks of the Dutch unemployed.
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NEWS
December 2, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has been more than two years since 36-year-old Ferdi Rutenfrans lost his last paying job, cataloguing books at the Amsterdam public library. "I wasn't exactly fired," he said. But he didn't exactly quit either. He chafed under what he calls the library's "hierarchical" organization. "I had words with my employer," and the next thing he knew he had joined the sizable ranks of the Dutch unemployed.
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NEWS
February 24, 1990 | From Associated Press
Caretaker Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson said Friday that he is forming a new government to end Sweden's political crisis and to quell the labor strife and inflation that have beset the economy. Carlsson, from the Social Democratic Labor Party, said the government will consider opening Sweden to workers from the Soviet Baltic republics to alleviate an inflation-boosting labor shortage and will seek to mediate labor disputes.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson resigned after Parliament rejected his Social Democratic government's stiff measures aimed at ending strikes and controlling inflation. The action threw the country into a political crisis. Carlsson gave his government's resignation to Speaker Thage G. Peterson, who remained head of a caretaker Cabinet. Analysts said the most likely outcome would be a reconstituted Social Democratic government with tacit support of the Communists.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Swedish Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson said the economy is "falling apart" and that his government will resign unless Parliament bans strikes and imposes a wage-price freeze for two years. The plan also would put a two-year freeze on local taxes, rents and stock dividends. Some opposition lawmakers accused Carlsson's Social Democrats of declaring economic martial law and advocating a planned economy when Eastern Europe is abandoning that approach.
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | From Associated Press
Caretaker Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson said Friday that he is forming a new government to end Sweden's political crisis and to quell the labor strife and inflation that have beset the economy. Carlsson, from the Social Democratic Labor Party, said the government will consider opening Sweden to workers from the Soviet Baltic republics to alleviate an inflation-boosting labor shortage and will seek to mediate labor disputes.
NEWS
April 23, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Chernobyl nuclear plant exploded five years ago this week and loosed a radioactive cloud over much of Europe, it also polarized European attitudes toward nuclear power. Nowhere is there a clearer fault line than along the border between Austria and Czechoslovakia. Here on the Czechoslovak side, an old, Soviet-designed nuclear plant pumps megawatts of electricity to the Slovak countryside.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1986 | Harry Bernstein
Perched comfortably on a chair in his office, his legs curled under his slim body, Olof Palme restlessly puffed away on yet another cigarette one day about 10 years ago as he intently but happily described his paradoxical country to me and my wife, Joanne. The prime minister of Sweden, who was assassinated in Stockholm on Feb. 28, generously had agreed to meet alone with us for a few minutes during our visit to the Swedish capital to study labor relations there.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerzy Wozniak has been on deathwatch since the collapse of communism six years ago. As the Solidarity trade union leader at Poland's largest state-owned car maker, Wozniak has been privy to reams of bleak financial news. The ailing manufacturer, he says, cannot survive in a competitive market without slashing thousands of jobs. "Time is running out on us," said Wozniak, a 26-year employee of Fabryka Samochodow Osobowych (FSO), which has 21,000 workers. "Everyone realizes that."
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson resigned after Parliament rejected his Social Democratic government's stiff measures aimed at ending strikes and controlling inflation. The action threw the country into a political crisis. Carlsson gave his government's resignation to Speaker Thage G. Peterson, who remained head of a caretaker Cabinet. Analysts said the most likely outcome would be a reconstituted Social Democratic government with tacit support of the Communists.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Swedish Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson said the economy is "falling apart" and that his government will resign unless Parliament bans strikes and imposes a wage-price freeze for two years. The plan also would put a two-year freeze on local taxes, rents and stock dividends. Some opposition lawmakers accused Carlsson's Social Democrats of declaring economic martial law and advocating a planned economy when Eastern Europe is abandoning that approach.
NEWS
September 28, 1996 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the United States, for the first time, the wives of both major-party presidential candidates are women with careers and accomplishments of their own, each a grade-grinding graduate of an Ivy League law school. With 58.9% of women in the work force, Americans might be expected to applaud the end of the political-helpmate era. But no. First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton continues to be an object of suspicion and even loathing for some members of the press and public.
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