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Sweden Taxes

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BUSINESS
November 24, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Heavily taxed Swedes will keep more of their paychecks under the first major tax reform since the welfare state was created 50 years ago, the finance minister said Wednesday. The package, planned for legislation in 1990, would simplify income tax and close loopholes that have been exploited by the rich at the expense of the worker, said the minister, Kjell-Olof Feldt. The program calls for sharp reductions in income tax, which is 72% on the highest brackets and on some overtime payments.
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BUSINESS
November 24, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Heavily taxed Swedes will keep more of their paychecks under the first major tax reform since the welfare state was created 50 years ago, the finance minister said Wednesday. The package, planned for legislation in 1990, would simplify income tax and close loopholes that have been exploited by the rich at the expense of the worker, said the minister, Kjell-Olof Feldt. The program calls for sharp reductions in income tax, which is 72% on the highest brackets and on some overtime payments.
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BUSINESS
February 10, 1986 | Associated Press
With multimillionaires moving their families to other countries, Swedes are reconsidering the structure of inheritance taxes, which can run as high as 70%. An announcement by the 34-year-old billionaire industrialist Fredrik Lundberg that he was moving to Switzerland set off debate in the country about the tax on inheritances. "It's my and my family's wish to secure the control of the company within the family in case I die," Lundberg was quoted as saying in a newspaper interview.
NEWS
May 4, 2003 | Karl Ritter, Associated Press Writer
If the cardinal sin in American politics is cheating on your spouse, in Sweden, it's cheating on your taxes. Gudrun Schyman knows. Her 10-year leadership of the former communist Left Party crumbled a few weeks ago after she was accused of tax evasion. The wit and charisma that helped the 54-year-old feminist recover from earlier crises, including a public bout with alcoholism, didn't fix the damage done by questionable deductions on her 2002 tax return.
SPORTS
July 9, 1985
Boris Becker took off for his Monte Carlo condo Monday, bypassing his hometown in West Germany. Interestingly, on the same day, all-time Wimbledon winner Bjorn Borg announced he would be leaving Monte Carlo to return to Sweden. Appearing with 18-year-old girlfriend Jannike Bjorling at a news conference in Stockholm, Borg said, "My heart beats for Sweden. Me and Jannike are looking for a place here. I've always wanted to live in Sweden, even though some people may have doubted this."
FOOD
December 19, 1991 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
Glen Ellen Winery is the first to do it: a wine without a cork that sells for $10. The winery, best known for its multi-million-case production of Proprietors Reserve wines, also has a small line of wines called the Imagery Series. It features rare grape varieties and uses labels adorned with paintings by famous local artists. In 1990, Glen Ellen bought Dolcetto grapes from Andy Hoxsey's ranch in the Napa Valley. Dolcetto is an Italian variety that makes a light, dry red wine.
SPORTS
May 27, 1988 | THOMAS BONK, Times Staff Writer
More than six years since he retired from tournament tennis, Bjorn Borg is in business again, only not the tennis business. No, the remaining Beatles aren't getting back together to make a record and Borg isn't pole-vaulting saunas back home in Stockholm, rounding into shape to make a comeback. In tennis, he's not Bjorn again. After all, in 10 days Borg is going to turn 32. That makes Borg 14 years older than superkid Andre Agassi.
MAGAZINE
January 11, 1987 | PAUL CIOTTI, Paul Ciotti is a staff writer for Los Angeles Times Magazine
When you've spent all your life in the same country, you don't notice things that to foreigners seem both strange and remarkable. Few Americans, for instance, walk around saying, "Hey, we live in a classless society." But, to people who come to California from more stratified and traditional countries, the marvel of that achievement is exceeded only by the fact that our telephone system works.
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