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Sweden Territorial Waters

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July 2, 1987 | Associated Press
A Swedish navy helicopter dropped depth charges and fired anti-submarine grenades Wednesday at what appeared to be a foreign submarine detected in coastal waters, the military said. The weapons were used after several days of indications of "unidentified alien submarine activity" in Tore Bay at the northern end of the Bothnia Gulf that divides much of Sweden and Finland, defense staff spokesman Jan Tuninger said.
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NEWS
January 12, 1988
The prime ministers of Sweden and the Soviet Union emerged from a four-hour meeting in Stockholm to say they are still hopeful of settling a 19-year-old dispute over territorial waters in the Baltic Sea, which Sweden says is blocking relations with Moscow. "The talks are going well. Wait a little longer," said Soviet Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov after the meeting with Swedish leader Ingvar Carlsson. It was the first high-level Soviet visit in 15 years.
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NEWS
January 12, 1988
The prime ministers of Sweden and the Soviet Union emerged from a four-hour meeting in Stockholm to say they are still hopeful of settling a 19-year-old dispute over territorial waters in the Baltic Sea, which Sweden says is blocking relations with Moscow. "The talks are going well. Wait a little longer," said Soviet Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov after the meeting with Swedish leader Ingvar Carlsson. It was the first high-level Soviet visit in 15 years.
NEWS
July 2, 1987 | Associated Press
A Swedish navy helicopter dropped depth charges and fired anti-submarine grenades Wednesday at what appeared to be a foreign submarine detected in coastal waters, the military said. The weapons were used after several days of indications of "unidentified alien submarine activity" in Tore Bay at the northern end of the Bothnia Gulf that divides much of Sweden and Finland, defense staff spokesman Jan Tuninger said.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | Associated Press
Soviet Foreign Minister Boris D. Pankin promised Wednesday that he will reduce KGB staffs in embassies and investigate submarine intrusions into Swedish territory. The number of agents working abroad for the secret agency will be cut "to the lowest minimum required by our security interests," Pankin told a news conference. Swedish security police have estimated that a third of the diplomats at the Soviet Embassy in Stockholm have been linked to the KGB.
NEWS
November 11, 1987 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
The late Gunnar Myrdal, the world renowned Swedish sociologist and economist, used to muse, "Why has this country never experienced corruption?" Like Myrdal, most Swedes were proud of their government's lofty reputation for efficiency and probity: Other nations might have to battle corruption and incompetence, but Swedes assumed they were immune. But, now, something has gone wrong with Sweden's squeaky clean self-image, and possibly with the country itself.
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