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December 3, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sweden's 150-year-old temperance movement has been so successful in wresting this country from the Vodka Belt, people like to say that more Swedes live from alcohol now than die from it. With Europe's highest taxes on tipples, the welfare state's coffers get an annual infusion of $1.3 billion from drink sales--and the resulting high prices have depressed consumption and alcohol-related deaths and illnesses to one of the lowest levels in the developed world.
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NEWS
December 3, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sweden's 150-year-old temperance movement has been so successful in wresting this country from the Vodka Belt, people like to say that more Swedes live from alcohol now than die from it. With Europe's highest taxes on tipples, the welfare state's coffers get an annual infusion of $1.3 billion from drink sales--and the resulting high prices have depressed consumption and alcohol-related deaths and illnesses to one of the lowest levels in the developed world.
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NEWS
December 2, 1987
Documents seized by Swedish customs police from the office of an international arms dealer say Yugoslavia played a key role in the alleged smuggling of hundreds of millions of dollars worth of explosives to Iran. The documents were seized in raids between 1984 and 1986 on the offices of Karl-Erik Schmitz, head of Scandinavian Commodity, a company in Malmo, Sweden. Arms trade experts believe Schmitz smuggled explosives worth $600 million to Iran.
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