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NEWS
September 28, 1996 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the United States, for the first time, the wives of both major-party presidential candidates are women with careers and accomplishments of their own, each a grade-grinding graduate of an Ivy League law school. With 58.9% of women in the work force, Americans might be expected to applaud the end of the political-helpmate era. But no. First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton continues to be an object of suspicion and even loathing for some members of the press and public.
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SPORTS
July 13, 2011 | By Grahame L. Jones
Europe's interest in the 2011 Women's World Cup in Germany ran into a brick wall Wednesday night. For the Europeans, it's all over. First, the U.S. knocked out France, 3-1, in one semifinal in Moenchengladbach. Next, Japan did the same thing by the same score to previously unbeaten and untied Sweden in Frankfurt. So it will be the U.S. versus Japan in Sunday's final — a two-time champion against a first-time finalist. But this appears to be nothing like the Japanese team that the U.S. defeated twice, each time by a 2-0 margin, in friendly matches in Columbus, Ohio, and Cary, N.C., in May. For one thing, Japan Coach Nori Sasaki seems to have stumbled onto a trove of winning tactics.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hormone replacement therapy in middle-aged women can reduce the risk of hip fracture by as much as 20% in the first decade after menopause, according to a study of more than 23,000 Swedish women published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The study, which confirms and expands upon similar findings from earlier studies, found that the women who benefited most from the treatment were those who were under 60 when they began and who were taking a potent form of estrogen hormones.
SPORTS
July 6, 2011 | By Grahame L. Jones
The warning signs had been there all along. They were evident in Cancun, Mexico, last November. They were there again in Chongqing, China, in January. They could be seen in London as recently as April. Each of those games ended in a 2-1 loss for the U.S. women's national soccer team — first to Mexico, then to Sweden, then to England. Each time the message was the same: American players, once regarded as virtually invincible, are invincible no more. On Wednesday night, in Wolfsburg, Germany, Sweden proved the point, handing the Americans another 2-1 loss, and this time the consequences for the U.S. could be unpleasant.
NEWS
August 25, 1997 | From Reuters
The Swedish government could face thousands of legal claims for compensation because of a Nazi-style campaign of forced sterilization of women that historians say has been hushed up for years. Swedes have been shocked in recent days by revelations from journalist Maciej Zaremba that Swedish governments sterilized 60,000 women to rid society of "inferior" racial types and to encourage Aryan features.
NEWS
June 27, 1988 | DON IRWIN, Times Staff Writer
They still lack full equality with men, but women in the United States and Northern Europe enjoy more freedom, better health and longer lives than their counterparts elsewhere, while women in much of the underdeveloped world continue "poor, powerless and pregnant," with little chance for improvement. These are findings of a study made public Sunday by the Population Crisis Committee, a Washington-based research group that works to slow world population growth.
SPORTS
July 13, 2011 | By Grahame L. Jones
Europe's interest in the 2011 Women's World Cup in Germany ran into a brick wall Wednesday night. For the Europeans, it's all over. First, the U.S. knocked out France, 3-1, in one semifinal in Moenchengladbach. Next, Japan did the same thing by the same score to previously unbeaten and untied Sweden in Frankfurt. So it will be the U.S. versus Japan in Sunday's final — a two-time champion against a first-time finalist. But this appears to be nothing like the Japanese team that the U.S. defeated twice, each time by a 2-0 margin, in friendly matches in Columbus, Ohio, and Cary, N.C., in May. For one thing, Japan Coach Nori Sasaki seems to have stumbled onto a trove of winning tactics.
SPORTS
July 6, 2011 | By Grahame L. Jones
The warning signs had been there all along. They were evident in Cancun, Mexico, last November. They were there again in Chongqing, China, in January. They could be seen in London as recently as April. Each of those games ended in a 2-1 loss for the U.S. women's national soccer team — first to Mexico, then to Sweden, then to England. Each time the message was the same: American players, once regarded as virtually invincible, are invincible no more. On Wednesday night, in Wolfsburg, Germany, Sweden proved the point, handing the Americans another 2-1 loss, and this time the consequences for the U.S. could be unpleasant.
SPORTS
February 10, 1998 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Karyn Bye doesn't think of herself as a goal scorer. "I don't necessarily consider myself a player who can stick-handle through three or four people," said Bye, a right wing on the U.S. women's Olympic hockey team. "I like to give and go and pass the puck." Sue Merz doesn't think of herself as an offensive-minded defenseman. "Mostly the way I play is conservative," she said. "I rarely get goals and I rarely get points." The first two games of the tournament suggest both women are modest.
SPORTS
July 27, 1992
* WEIGHTLIFTING (52kg--115 pounds) GOLD: Ivan Ivanov (Bulgaria) SILVER: Lin Qisheng (China) BRONZE: Traian Ciharean (Romania) SHOOTING * MEN'S FREE PISTOL GOLD: Konstantine Loukachik (Unified Team) SILVER: Wang Yifu (China) BRONZE: Ragnar Skanaker (Sweden) * WOMEN'S AIR RIFLE GOLD: Yeo Kab Soon (South Korea) SILVER: Vesela Nikolaeva Letcheva (Bulgaria) BRONZE: Aranka Binder (Independent)
SPORTS
February 10, 1998 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Karyn Bye doesn't think of herself as a goal scorer. "I don't necessarily consider myself a player who can stick-handle through three or four people," said Bye, a right wing on the U.S. women's Olympic hockey team. "I like to give and go and pass the puck." Sue Merz doesn't think of herself as an offensive-minded defenseman. "Mostly the way I play is conservative," she said. "I rarely get goals and I rarely get points." The first two games of the tournament suggest both women are modest.
NEWS
August 25, 1997 | From Reuters
The Swedish government could face thousands of legal claims for compensation because of a Nazi-style campaign of forced sterilization of women that historians say has been hushed up for years. Swedes have been shocked in recent days by revelations from journalist Maciej Zaremba that Swedish governments sterilized 60,000 women to rid society of "inferior" racial types and to encourage Aryan features.
NEWS
September 28, 1996 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the United States, for the first time, the wives of both major-party presidential candidates are women with careers and accomplishments of their own, each a grade-grinding graduate of an Ivy League law school. With 58.9% of women in the work force, Americans might be expected to applaud the end of the political-helpmate era. But no. First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton continues to be an object of suspicion and even loathing for some members of the press and public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hormone replacement therapy in middle-aged women can reduce the risk of hip fracture by as much as 20% in the first decade after menopause, according to a study of more than 23,000 Swedish women published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The study, which confirms and expands upon similar findings from earlier studies, found that the women who benefited most from the treatment were those who were under 60 when they began and who were taking a potent form of estrogen hormones.
NEWS
June 27, 1988 | DON IRWIN, Times Staff Writer
They still lack full equality with men, but women in the United States and Northern Europe enjoy more freedom, better health and longer lives than their counterparts elsewhere, while women in much of the underdeveloped world continue "poor, powerless and pregnant," with little chance for improvement. These are findings of a study made public Sunday by the Population Crisis Committee, a Washington-based research group that works to slow world population growth.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2001
Playing It Cheap: ''Researchers out of Montreal University say that a woman ordering a chicken salad while dining out heightens her sexual allure with a date.... [Basically, they're saying] a woman ordering a chicken salad is sexier. I was trying to figure out why chicken salad would make them more appealing....Then I realized, of course, chicken salad is the cheapest thing on the menu. That's going to turn on any guy.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1988 | Associated Press
Three decades after breaking the all-male tradition in the Church of Sweden, women are becoming priests in increasing numbers, and some think the clergy could become a female profession. The Lutheran state church was one of the last bastions of conservatism to yield to feminism in this open-minded country, where sexual equality has long been a watchword.
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