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November 27, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Saddam Hussein on Monday ordered the release of three American men held hostage since his country's Aug. 2 invasion of Kuwait. Hussein, who last week offered to free all the estimated 2,000 Western and Japanese hostages held in Iraq over three months starting on Christmas Day, agreed to free the three Americans in response to a plea by their relatives, who met him Monday in Baghdad. Two of the three Americans appeared with Hussein and some of their relatives in a television broadcast.
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NEWS
November 27, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Saddam Hussein on Monday ordered the release of three American men held hostage since his country's Aug. 2 invasion of Kuwait. Hussein, who last week offered to free all the estimated 2,000 Western and Japanese hostages held in Iraq over three months starting on Christmas Day, agreed to free the three Americans in response to a plea by their relatives, who met him Monday in Baghdad. Two of the three Americans appeared with Hussein and some of their relatives in a television broadcast.
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NEWS
August 24, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraqi authorities stood firm Thursday against the release of civilian hostages whose governments support the blockade of Iraq, and they threw up new barriers in front of the few families promised safe passage. Swedish and Swiss authorities, whose nations have not contributed ships to the blockade, said busloads of their nationals made the 30-hour drive from Baghdad to the Turkish border, only to be blocked in most cases by Iraqi frontier guards who said their papers were not in order.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraqi authorities stood firm Thursday against the release of civilian hostages whose governments support the blockade of Iraq, and they threw up new barriers in front of the few families promised safe passage. Swedish and Swiss authorities, whose nations have not contributed ships to the blockade, said busloads of their nationals made the 30-hour drive from Baghdad to the Turkish border, only to be blocked in most cases by Iraqi frontier guards who said their papers were not in order.
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