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December 15, 1991 | Associated Press
Artur Lundkvist, who despite having only six years of formal education became a prolific author and a member of the Swedish Academy, which awards the Nobel Prize for literature, died Wednesday. He was 85. A longtime friend, Roland Olsson, said the writer died at a Stockholm hospital after a long illness. The first of Lundkvist's 70 books appeared in 1928, and he played an important role on the Swedish literary scene for decades.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
During a five-decade career, Polish poet Wislawa Szymborska had so rarely appeared in public that a newspaper dubbed her the "Greta Garbo of poetry" after the notoriously private actress. But in 1996, Poland's most reticent literary icon was forced to open her door to the world: She had won the Nobel Prize in literature and the world was clamoring for her reaction. The public attention was so incessant that she stopped writing poems for two years, a consequence she later described, only somewhat jokingly, as "the Stockholm tragedy.
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NEWS
November 1, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere between shameless promoter of personal interests and champion of a once little-known literary talent from China stands an unapologetic Goran Malmqvist, a member of the Swedish Academy whose behavior in this year's Nobel literature prize selection has besmirched the world of letters' sanctum sanctorum. A retired Stockholm University professor of Chinese languages and literature, Malmqvist just happens to be the Swedish translator of this year's laureate, exiled dissident Gao Xingjian.
WORLD
October 6, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
With the prize announcement moments away and the phone resolutely silent, Tomas Transtromer figured that his chance for Nobel glory had slipped by once again. As Sweden's most lauded poet and a perennial favorite for the literature prize, Transtromer was used to the feeling. But just a few minutes before the rest of the world heard it, the Stockholm native received the unexpected news Thursday that he had won after all. Word came in a slightly tardy (local) call from the Swedish Academy, which bestows the coveted award.
NEWS
October 3, 1996 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Autumn is Nobel season here in the Swedish capital, and every Thursday afternoon since the beginning of September a small group of men and women has been meeting in secret in an ornate 18th century hall to discuss who will receive the world's top honor for literature. No one records the deliberations over the prize, this year valued at about $1.1 million. The names of the four runners-up--there are normally five finalists--are to remain sealed for 50 years.
WORLD
October 12, 2005 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writer
A loud crack of dissent Tuesday rattled the secretive circle that hands out Nobel Prizes. Days before this year's literature prize announcement, a member of the Swedish Academy, which gives the award, resigned in disgust over the unexpected choice of last year's winner, Austrian writer Elfriede Jelinek. The high-brow scuffle in the august literary chambers of Stockholm was provoked by the searing pen of a disgruntled 82-year-old academy member.
OPINION
April 15, 2009 | TIM RUTTEN
Seamus Heaney, the greatest living English-language poet, turned 70 this week. The Irish, of course, take their poets more seriously than most -- and they take their Nobel laureates, of whom Heaney is the fourth, very seriously indeed. Monday, then, was quite a day for the Derry-born farmer's son now known to literary Dublin's sharp-tongued gossips as "famous Seamus." Famous he surely is.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1999 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Columbia University professor Robert A. Mundell won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences on Wednesday for his pioneering study of how domestic economies respond when money flows across international borders. His remarkably hardy models, developed in the early 1960s, provided some of the theoretical underpinnings for the creation this year of Europe's new 11-nation currency, the euro.
BOOKS
December 17, 2000
Editor's Note: When Gao Xingjian was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in October, some observers, including Germany's minister of culture, cried foul. Why, they asked, did Goran Malmqvist, a member of the Swedish Academy, advise Gao--some time prior to the announcement--to change publishers? Because Malmqvist is also Gao's Swedish translator, the suspicion was strong that he might profit from the academy's decision. These charges were the subject of a front-page story in The Times (Nov.
WORLD
October 6, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
With the prize announcement moments away and the phone resolutely silent, Tomas Transtromer figured that his chance for Nobel glory had slipped by once again. As Sweden's most lauded poet and a perennial favorite for the literature prize, Transtromer was used to the feeling. But just a few minutes before the rest of the world heard it, the Stockholm native received the unexpected news Thursday that he had won after all. Word came in a slightly tardy (local) call from the Swedish Academy, which bestows the coveted award.
WORLD
October 8, 2010 | By Reed Johnson and Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
Like some other recent Nobel literary laureates, Mario Vargas Llosa, the prolific Peruvian novelist, essayist and playwright and former center-right presidential candidate, has been known as much for his controversial political views as for his books. But Vargas Llosa's politics, like his ironic fiction, are not easily typecast. As a critic of both right- and left-wing authoritarianism, the 74-year-old author has expressed his wariness of utopian thinking, populist cults of personality and the notion that flawed human beings are capable of building an earthly paradise.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2010 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
On Monday, news started buzzing that Cormac McCarthy, chronicler of a blasted and violent early American West and, more recently, a dystopic frozen future, might be under consideration for the Nobel Prize in Literature, whose announcement is planned for Thursday. British wagering company Ladbrokes has tracked McCarthy's odds rising from 66-to-1 to 8-to-1. That makes him the highest-ranked American, unless you count Ngugi wa Thiong'o, who as I was typing moved from second place to first; wa Thiong'o has been a resident of the United States since his exile from Kenya in the late 1970s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2010 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
When the Nobel Prize in literature is announced Thursday, the choice may be ? if the last two years are any indication ? a confounding one. In 2008, the prize went to Jean-Marie Gustave le Clézio, a French novelist concerned with colonization and its discontents, whose work was almost entirely unknown in the United States; last year's recipient was the German-Romanian Herta Müller, whose exquisitely rendered fictions are still largely unavailable here....
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By Lewis MacAdams
Just a few hours before Orhan Pamuk, the 2006 Nobel Laureate in literature, was set to read from his new novel, "The Museum of Innocence" (Alfred A. Knopf: 540 pp., $28.95), at the Japan America Theatre, the lifelong Istanbul resident was strolling down Hill Street, recognized by nobody, on his first visit to Los Angeles. In awarding him the Nobel Prize, the Swedish Academy cited Pamuk's "quest for the melancholic soul of his native city." In his mesmerizing "The Museum of Innocence," Istanbul -- its sounds, its smells, its history -- permeates everything.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2009 | Ben Ehrenreich, Ehrenreich is the author of the novel "The Suitors" and a fellow of the Horizon Institute.
Desert A Novel J.M.G. Le Clézio, translated from the French by C. Dickson Verba Mundi/David R. Godine: 352 pp., $25.95 When Horace Engdahl, the permanent secretary of the Swedish Academy, criticized the American literary establishment for its insularity last fall, I couldn't disagree with him. A small handful of non-Anglophone novelists do steal their way into stateside dinner-party conversation each year, but for the most part, we...
OPINION
April 15, 2009 | TIM RUTTEN
Seamus Heaney, the greatest living English-language poet, turned 70 this week. The Irish, of course, take their poets more seriously than most -- and they take their Nobel laureates, of whom Heaney is the fourth, very seriously indeed. Monday, then, was quite a day for the Derry-born farmer's son now known to literary Dublin's sharp-tongued gossips as "famous Seamus." Famous he surely is.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2010 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
On Monday, news started buzzing that Cormac McCarthy, chronicler of a blasted and violent early American West and, more recently, a dystopic frozen future, might be under consideration for the Nobel Prize in Literature, whose announcement is planned for Thursday. British wagering company Ladbrokes has tracked McCarthy's odds rising from 66-to-1 to 8-to-1. That makes him the highest-ranked American, unless you count Ngugi wa Thiong'o, who as I was typing moved from second place to first; wa Thiong'o has been a resident of the United States since his exile from Kenya in the late 1970s.
WORLD
October 8, 2010 | By Reed Johnson and Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
Like some other recent Nobel literary laureates, Mario Vargas Llosa, the prolific Peruvian novelist, essayist and playwright and former center-right presidential candidate, has been known as much for his controversial political views as for his books. But Vargas Llosa's politics, like his ironic fiction, are not easily typecast. As a critic of both right- and left-wing authoritarianism, the 74-year-old author has expressed his wariness of utopian thinking, populist cults of personality and the notion that flawed human beings are capable of building an earthly paradise.
WORLD
October 12, 2005 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writer
A loud crack of dissent Tuesday rattled the secretive circle that hands out Nobel Prizes. Days before this year's literature prize announcement, a member of the Swedish Academy, which gives the award, resigned in disgust over the unexpected choice of last year's winner, Austrian writer Elfriede Jelinek. The high-brow scuffle in the august literary chambers of Stockholm was provoked by the searing pen of a disgruntled 82-year-old academy member.
BOOKS
December 17, 2000
Editor's Note: When Gao Xingjian was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in October, some observers, including Germany's minister of culture, cried foul. Why, they asked, did Goran Malmqvist, a member of the Swedish Academy, advise Gao--some time prior to the announcement--to change publishers? Because Malmqvist is also Gao's Swedish translator, the suspicion was strong that he might profit from the academy's decision. These charges were the subject of a front-page story in The Times (Nov.
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