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October 3, 1996 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Autumn is Nobel season here in the Swedish capital, and every Thursday afternoon since the beginning of September a small group of men and women has been meeting in secret in an ornate 18th century hall to discuss who will receive the world's top honor for literature. No one records the deliberations over the prize, this year valued at about $1.1 million. The names of the four runners-up--there are normally five finalists--are to remain sealed for 50 years.
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NEWS
November 1, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere between shameless promoter of personal interests and champion of a once little-known literary talent from China stands an unapologetic Goran Malmqvist, a member of the Swedish Academy whose behavior in this year's Nobel literature prize selection has besmirched the world of letters' sanctum sanctorum. A retired Stockholm University professor of Chinese languages and literature, Malmqvist just happens to be the Swedish translator of this year's laureate, exiled dissident Gao Xingjian.
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NEWS
November 1, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere between shameless promoter of personal interests and champion of a once little-known literary talent from China stands an unapologetic Goran Malmqvist, a member of the Swedish Academy whose behavior in this year's Nobel literature prize selection has besmirched the world of letters' sanctum sanctorum. A retired Stockholm University professor of Chinese languages and literature, Malmqvist just happens to be the Swedish translator of this year's laureate, exiled dissident Gao Xingjian.
NEWS
October 3, 1996 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Autumn is Nobel season here in the Swedish capital, and every Thursday afternoon since the beginning of September a small group of men and women has been meeting in secret in an ornate 18th century hall to discuss who will receive the world's top honor for literature. No one records the deliberations over the prize, this year valued at about $1.1 million. The names of the four runners-up--there are normally five finalists--are to remain sealed for 50 years.
NEWS
October 9, 1987
The committee deciding the 1987 Nobel Peace Prize said it has reached a decision, but reports persisted that a literature prize winner has yet to be selected. The official announcement of the peace prize is to be made Tuesday. Four main candidates reportedly are being considered by the Nobel Institute in Oslo--Philippine President Corazon Aquino, Argentine President Raul Alfonsin, jailed South African nationalist Nelson Mandela and the Geneva-based World Health Organization.
NEWS
October 11, 1990 | From Associated Press
Mexican writer Octavio Paz, a onetime diplomat whose poems and essays amalgamate a variety of cultures, won the 1990 Nobel Literature Prize today. The Swedish Academy of Letters said Paz, 76, got the $700,000 award "for impassioned writing with wide horizons, characterized by sensuous intelligence and humanistic integrity." "I am very grateful to the committee," Paz said when reached by telephone at a New York hotel.
NEWS
December 20, 1990 | MARGARITA NIETO, Nieto, a Cal State Northridge professor, is a Smithsonian senior postdoctoral fellow at the Archives of American Art.
I draw these letters As the day draws its images and blows over them And does not return --Octavio Paz, "A Draft of Shadows" Throughout a long, prodigious and brilliant literary career, words have been the weapon that Octavio Paz has raised against the onslaught of time and its limitations to human existence.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Wole Soyinka, a Nigerian novelist, poet and playwright who was jailed during the Biafra war, won the 1986 Nobel Prize in literature today and James McGill Buchanan of George Mason University in Virginia won the economics prize. The Swedish Academy of Letters cited Buchanan, 67, for his theory that public economic policy is formulated according to the self-interest of politicians and governments.
NEWS
October 9, 1992 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Derek Walcott, a West Indian poet whose ancestors were slaves, won the 1992 Nobel Prize for Literature on Thursday, marking the first time the award has gone to a Caribbean writer. Called a modern-day Homer by some critics, the 62-year-old poet was honored for an extensive body of work that offers a rich, evocative blend of African, West Indian and European cultural traditions. "In him, West Indian culture has found its great poet," said the Swedish Academy of Letters in awarding the $1.
NEWS
October 12, 1990 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Poet and essayist Octavio Paz, whose haunting, evocative writing represents a combination of modern and classical Spanish with echoes of pre-conquest Mexico, won the Nobel Prize for Literature on Thursday. The Swedish Academy of Letters, acting in Stockholm, honored the 76-year-old former diplomat for "impassioned writing with wide horizons, characterized by sensuous intelligence and humanistic integrity."
BOOKS
October 2, 1994 | PETER JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You say I am a riddle--it may be For all of us are riddles unexplained Begun in pain, in deeper torture ended This breathing clay, what business has it here? Some petty wants to chain us to the earth, Some lofty thoughts to lift us to the spheres And cheat us with that semblance of a soul To dream of immortality, til Time O'er empty visions draws the closing veil And a new life sets in--the life of worms Those hungry plunderers of the human breast . . .
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