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Sweet Science

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BUSINESS
February 11, 2007
Regarding "Trading punches," about boxing and Wall Street (Jan. 28): I'm always happy (and not a little amused) to read articles about people discovering the joys associated with the many aspects of boxing. But I would have been even more delighted if Walter Hamilton had pointed out that there are plenty of women now "trading punches" right alongside the men. I am a 60-something single white woman. I took up a study of the "sweet science" many years ago -- not only to learn how to defend myself and release tension but also to learn about the Latino population of Los Angeles, which made up the bulk of the people hitting the heavy bags and sparring.
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SPORTS
June 15, 2012
I didn't pay for the Bradley-Pacquiao fight, but I did turn on the pay-per-view channel and watched the fight on its scrambled format with only the sound ... the same way two of the judges, obviously, watched it. Marc Popkin Los Angeles :: In a sport that has no mores eyes to blacken, the powers that be in boxing somehow found a way to do it again. Is it any wonder mixed martial arts is taking over? Dan Jensen San Clemente :: Perhaps The Times, in its continuing efforts to ram reams of copy about boxing down our collective throats, should pay heed to one of the sport's leading figures.
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SPORTS
April 8, 1997 | RANDY HARVEY
The Pulitzer Prizes were announced Monday. I didn't win one. Again. I was glad to see, however, that a sports story was honored. It was a poignant feature by Lisa Pollak of the Baltimore Sun about umpire John Hirschbeck, who lost one son, has another with the same illness and, unlike the fans Monday in Kansas City, knows that life is too short to obsess on Roberto Alomar. For the second time in a week, I was reminded of how marvelous sportswriting can be.
SPORTS
November 29, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
The boos started at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas right after the ring announcer read the scorecards and revealed that Manny Pacquiao had won a close majority decision over Juan Manuel Marquez. The booing was understandable. Most of the boxing world wanted Pacquiao to defeat Marquez convincingly Nov. 12 to set up the long-awaited super-fight between Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather Jr. But what I saw from my second-row seat at ringside was something different — from the HBO broadcast team, from my colleagues watching on television, even from the ringside judges.
BOOKS
January 27, 1991 | KATHERINE DUNN, Dunn is a boxing stringer for the Associated Press. Her most recent novel, "Geek Love" (Alfred A. Knopf/Warner), was a finalist for the 1989 National Book Award
A. J. Liebling was a fat little man who loved the fights. He was a gourmet as well as a gourmand, a wheezing but intrepid war correspondent and an acclaimed media critic. (It was Liebling who wrote, "Freedom of the press belongs to him who owns one.") But he was a rollicking god among boxing writers. He was born to money in 1904 in New York City and soon displayed an inclination to drag his tailored suits and spats through every entertaining gutter he could find.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2009 | Tim Rutten
When I was a young boxing writer, I once was invited to watch historic fight films with a small group that included Sugar Ray Robinson, by then long retired from the ring. Suffice to say, I was -- by several orders of magnitude -- the most ignorant person in the room, but the deference our companions paid even Robinson's briefest comment was striking. For my part, I recall being struck by the unexpected sophistication -- even delicacy -- of his descriptive vocabulary, which was studded with phrases borrowed from the worlds of dance and music, mainly jazz, and framed with a kind of poetic precision.
SPORTS
June 5, 1999
No pro sports team has won a world championship here in 11 years. Yet in the sun-drenched town of softies, laid-back fans and overpaid prima-donna athletes, it's all but overlooked that four current world boxing champions lace it up here: Oscar De La Hoya, Shane Mosley, Fernando Vargas and Frankie Liles. As Bill Plaschke rightfully says, "L.A. has become a city of sports losers." But don't tell that to fans of the sweet science. STANLEY WEISER Santa Monica
HEALTH
October 9, 2006
I spent 10 years trying to understand, if not master, the "sweet science," long before there was boxercise, aerobic boxing and men who see boxing as a way to "disguise the fact that they are exercising" ["Out of the Office and Into the Ring," Oct. 2]. For five years, I drove to Bell, Calif., standing alongside Julio Cesar Chavez, arguably Mexico's best "pound for pound" pugilist, learning how to throw a jab and avoid a hook. I learned that -- and much more. What I also realized was that as a woman I had as much fun and gratification as any of the men -- something the article fails to mention.
NEWS
November 23, 1986
David Haldane's Nov. 16 account of the Spruce Goose flight was a low blow to real boxing fans, and the boxers themselves. Haldane obviously is misinformed about the sport of boxing and ignorantly sees it as barbaric. He states that the fans are "peering intently at the gore of ambitious young fighters knocking each other senseless." I would like to inform Mr. Haldane that some fans don't view boxing as gore, but as the sweet science. The sport of pugilism. That there is skill and strategy involved.
SPORTS
May 24, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Baltimore Ravens safety Tom Zbikowski, saying his team's pursuit of a Super Bowl appearance is too great to resist, has withdrawn from his June 4 undercard boxing match at Staples Center to return to workouts with teammates in Baltimore. Zbikowski was 3-0 in his return to professional boxing this spring. His novel pursuit of the sweet science during the NFL's lockout made him an attractive draw to both a March card in Las Vegas headlined by super-welterweight world champion Miguel Cotto, and to the June 4 HBO date pitting WBC middleweight champion Sebastian Zbik of Germany against Mexico's Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. Zbikowski (4-0, three knockouts)
SPORTS
May 24, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Baltimore Ravens safety Tom Zbikowski, saying his team's pursuit of a Super Bowl appearance is too great to resist, has withdrawn from his June 4 undercard boxing match at Staples Center to return to workouts with teammates in Baltimore. Zbikowski was 3-0 in his return to professional boxing this spring. His novel pursuit of the sweet science during the NFL's lockout made him an attractive draw to both a March card in Las Vegas headlined by super-welterweight world champion Miguel Cotto, and to the June 4 HBO date pitting WBC middleweight champion Sebastian Zbik of Germany against Mexico's Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. Zbikowski (4-0, three knockouts)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2011 | By Mike Downey, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At the Fights American Writers on Boxing Edited by George Kimball & John Schulian Library of America: 517 pp., $35 Part freak show, part sitcom, part mortal combat ? ah, yes, behold the world of professional prizefighting, the face-break social network, an ultraviolent art and craft that to some is more subhuman than true sport. Or, as a fictional character unlocked by a key to Rod Serling's imagination once put it, ever so luridly: "Sport? Are you kiddin'? If there was headroom, they'd hold these things in sewers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Critic's pick: "Boxing Gym. " Frederick Wiseman's subtle and meditative documentary, set in an old school establishment in Austin, Texas, is never in a hurry to reveal itself, carefully allowing audiences the time and space to figure things out on their own. ? Kenneth Turan Frederick Wiseman's singular documentaries never hit you on the head, not even one called "Boxing Gym. " They are subtle and meditative affairs, never in a hurry to reveal themselves, carefully allowing audiences the time and space to figure things out on their own. Wiseman, indefatigable at 80, has been doing things this way for decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2009 | Tim Rutten
When I was a young boxing writer, I once was invited to watch historic fight films with a small group that included Sugar Ray Robinson, by then long retired from the ring. Suffice to say, I was -- by several orders of magnitude -- the most ignorant person in the room, but the deference our companions paid even Robinson's briefest comment was striking. For my part, I recall being struck by the unexpected sophistication -- even delicacy -- of his descriptive vocabulary, which was studded with phrases borrowed from the worlds of dance and music, mainly jazz, and framed with a kind of poetic precision.
SPORTS
May 8, 2009 | ERIC SONDHEIMER
If there's a fight on the campus of John Glenn High in Norwalk, forget about calling security as long as Javier Molina is close by. "We would never use a student that way, but Javier could bring a quick end to the fight," Principal Linda Granillo said. Molina is the rarest of high school seniors, a professional boxer who made his winning debut on ESPN with a second-round knockout on March 27 at the Nokia Theatre. Classmates cheered for him when the announcement was made during a school dance.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2008
Concerning your article ["Honoring Hebrew Hoopsters," by Gary Goldstein, Nov. 9], which makes note that the first great basketball players were of the Jewish faith, let me upgrade your information on this subject. I and five others of the Jewish faith, who played basketball for the YMHA in Montreal, played on the Canadian Olympic basketball team in London in 1948. We had lost the Canadian Championship in 1948 to the British Columbia team, but beat them in Toronto in a four-team round-robin, which determined that YMHA team was the lead half of the London team.
SPORTS
October 3, 2000 | LARRY STEWART
What: "Amazing Science of Sports" Where: The Learning Channel When: Tonight, 9-11 They call boxing the sweet science, but this two-part special focuses on baseball and football. The first one-hour part, "Science of Swing," takes a look at hitting techniques and examines what is considered one of the most difficult things to do in sports--hit a baseball. The second part, "The Physics of Football," looks at the state-of-the-art technology in pro football.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2008
Concerning your article ["Honoring Hebrew Hoopsters," by Gary Goldstein, Nov. 9], which makes note that the first great basketball players were of the Jewish faith, let me upgrade your information on this subject. I and five others of the Jewish faith, who played basketball for the YMHA in Montreal, played on the Canadian Olympic basketball team in London in 1948. We had lost the Canadian Championship in 1948 to the British Columbia team, but beat them in Toronto in a four-team round-robin, which determined that YMHA team was the lead half of the London team.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2007
Regarding "Trading punches," about boxing and Wall Street (Jan. 28): I'm always happy (and not a little amused) to read articles about people discovering the joys associated with the many aspects of boxing. But I would have been even more delighted if Walter Hamilton had pointed out that there are plenty of women now "trading punches" right alongside the men. I am a 60-something single white woman. I took up a study of the "sweet science" many years ago -- not only to learn how to defend myself and release tension but also to learn about the Latino population of Los Angeles, which made up the bulk of the people hitting the heavy bags and sparring.
HEALTH
October 9, 2006
I spent 10 years trying to understand, if not master, the "sweet science," long before there was boxercise, aerobic boxing and men who see boxing as a way to "disguise the fact that they are exercising" ["Out of the Office and Into the Ring," Oct. 2]. For five years, I drove to Bell, Calif., standing alongside Julio Cesar Chavez, arguably Mexico's best "pound for pound" pugilist, learning how to throw a jab and avoid a hook. I learned that -- and much more. What I also realized was that as a woman I had as much fun and gratification as any of the men -- something the article fails to mention.
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