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OPINION
September 13, 2011 | Jonah Goldberg
Is it too late for Mitt Romney to ask Tim Pawlenty to endorse Rick Perry instead? On Monday, the former Minnesota governor and, until the Iowa straw poll, presidential contender endorsed Romney's presidential bid. As best I can tell, reaction from rank-and-file Republicans does not suggest that a resulting tectonic shift in the polls toward Romney is imminent. According to legend, Josef Stalin asked, "How many divisions does the pope have?" Upon hearing the Pawlenty news, no doubt Perry said something similar, albeit with a Texan flavor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2013 | By Amy Reiter
The Top 8 singers on "The Voice" gave us a lot to love on Monday night. In addition to elaborately staging (Choreography! Exciting lighting! Fleets of backup dancers! Sprawling backing bands!), the evening's performances provided bursts of impressive vocal pyrotechnics, as well as compelling, quieter moments. Savvy song selections helped some singers hit their sweet spots, moving their coaches to seek out new ways to praise them. CeeLo Green even wrote his sole remaining contestant, Caroline Pennell, a mash note, declaring her to be, at the very least, the winner of his heart!
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FOOD
January 18, 2013 | By David Karp
FALLBROOK - Jim Russell's macadamia orchard looks like a park, 3 acres of holly-like evergreens growing above closely cropped grass. A casual observer would never suspect that it represents a relic of a bygone boom, a source of uniquely delicious nuts and one man's triumph over paralysis. Macadamias are native to eastern Australia, where there are two edible species: integrifolia in warmer areas and tetraphylla in cooler. The kind brought to Hawaii in 1881, and first commercialized there, was integrifolia , which proved most productive and suitable for roasting.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
GQ Cover:  Justin Timberlake, Will Ferrell and the late James Gandolfini are among the fellows appearing on special covers of GQ magazine's 18th annual "Men of the Year" issue announced Tuesday. The men's glossy held a pair of parties to celebrate its honorees -- one in New York City on Monday night, followed by one here in L.A. on Tuesday night -- details of which will be posted shortly. [GQ]   Gaga for Versace:  Fashion industry trade paper WWD is reporting that Lady Gaga will be appearing in Versace's spring advertising campaign.
FOOD
January 13, 2010 | By David Karp
Tucked away along a canal beside an imposing mountain grows an 80-acre orchard of oranges so enchanting that each winter I make a pilgrimage to its secluded site. What I find so special is not just the beauty of the grove, typically shrouded in tule mist, with sticky, reddish-brown clay soil, and dark green trees radiant with neon-orange, intensely aromatic fruits. It's also the curious history behind this planting, little known even to longtime locals, though it recently has become California's primary source for sour oranges, the kind used in marmalade.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2013 | By David Pierson
It's not easy peddling fresh fruit to a nation of junk-food addicts. But in rural Kern County, David Cain is working to win the stomachs and wallets of U.S. grocery shoppers. Cain is a fruit breeder. His latest invention is called the Cotton Candy grape. Bite into one of these green globes and the taste triggers the unmistakable sensation of eating a puffy, pink ball of spun sugar. By marrying select traits across thousands of nameless trial grapes, Cain and other breeders have developed patented varieties that pack enough sugar they may as well be Skittles on the vine.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The rocky cliffs, hard-sand beaches and swirling ocean current along the curvy Palos Verdes Peninsula can easily be mistaken for Northern California. There are suited-up surfers off shore, but the land follows steep ups and downs as it hugs (and sometimes falls into) the Pacific. It's a good place for a close-to-home getaway, particularly for those who haven't yet explored what must be among the least touristy parts of Southern California. The bed: Terranea Resort in Rancho Palos Verdes opened three years ago on the site of what once was the Marineland aquarium that opened in the 1950s.
TRAVEL
November 18, 2007 | Mary E. Forgione
THOUSAND ISLAND LAKE Ansel Adams Wilderness, Inyo National Forest Ask folks whether they've been to the Sierra, and they'll likely cite a well-tromped trail in Yosemite. But plunge deeper into California's iconic backyard and you get to Thousand Island Lake, a spot around 10,000 feet above sea level where teensy granite islands glitter in the sun, where alpenglow bouncing off Banner Peak rivals the Northern Lights, where you could spend slack-jawed hours staring at the landscape.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Ben and Kate" is a sweet, smart new show from Fox that may turn out to be the best new comedy of the fall season. Certainly, it is the most original, combining silly, often physical humor with the more sensitive homespun sort while also showcasing one of the most fascinating yet under-used relationships on TV: a brother and sister. Kate Fox (Dakota Johnson) is a twentysomething single mom, which means she'll be handling the voiceover. A bar manager, she's trying to create some stability for her 5-year-old daughter Maddie (Maggie Elizabeth Jones)
FOOD
February 23, 2013 | By David Karp
The Irvine Saturday farmers market is the largest and best in Orange County, but it's a mixed bag. It has some worthy local small farmers who come in person, along with more commercial farms, and even a few who have been sanctioned previously for cheating by agricultural authorities or other managers. Orange County Produce, owned by the family of the previous California agriculture secretary, A.G. Kawamura, farms on remnants of undeveloped local land, a bittersweet reminder of the county's past agricultural glory.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey
If you haven't caught Julia Louis-Dreyfus as the delightfully out-of-her depth vice president in her Emmy-winning HBO comedy "Veep," and have only dim memories of Elaine, "Seinfeld's" yuppie princess with a pea, "Enough Said" is an excellent example of her goofy, gracious way with comedy. Writer-director Nicole Holofcener's bittersweet romantic comedy about the difficulties of middle-age relationships is right in the actress' sweet spot, where insecurities and good intentions battle it out. Both Louis-Dreyfus and costar James Gandolfini (in his final role)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Revolutions never start when you think they will. In 1999, “The Blair Witch Project” took the film world by storm, becoming one of the hottest horror movies of all time. It was supposed to start a new wave of low-budget productions in the genre that would be similarly compelling and popular. That didn't happen, of course. Over the decade that followed, the film world endured a wave of copycat torture-porn movies and the last-gasp redos of a previous generation of hits a la “Friday the 13th” and “Nightmare on Elm Street.” Yet 14 years later, the revolution is officially in full swing.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Fires may rage and the U.N. roil, but let's scratch one hot-button concern off the national agenda: Al Jazeera America will not be overthrowing the American way of life any time soon. During its first week on air, even with a news cycle heavy on Syria, none of the reporting or anchor-desk chatter promoted the cause of the Muslim Brotherhood or blamed American foreign policy for the region's unrest. The many female anchors and correspondents were not forced to cover their heads and most of the reporters were either American or BBC-European.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Reality TV is experiencing something of a "Mad Men" moment, with bandannas and iced tea in place of fedoras and highballs. Last week, the Season 4 premiere of "Duck Dynasty" drew nearly 12 million viewers, making A&E's celebration of backwoods Alabama the No. 1 "nonfiction" show on cable and the No. 1 show of the week. Suddenly people who wouldn't know a Louisiana cedar if their Prius ran into it were chattering about the Robertsons, an extended clan of duck-call magnates who have been entertaining an increasing percentage of the population with their family-centric, redneck 'n' proud high jinks.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2013 | By David Pierson
It's not easy peddling fresh fruit to a nation of junk-food addicts. But in rural Kern County, David Cain is working to win the stomachs and wallets of U.S. grocery shoppers. Cain is a fruit breeder. His latest invention is called the Cotton Candy grape. Bite into one of these green globes and the taste triggers the unmistakable sensation of eating a puffy, pink ball of spun sugar. By marrying select traits across thousands of nameless trial grapes, Cain and other breeders have developed patented varieties that pack enough sugar they may as well be Skittles on the vine.
TRAVEL
April 14, 2013 | By Josh Noel
It's difficult to know when to buy an airline ticket and when to wait. Some sites offer to guide you on the timing of your purchase. I recently examined the fare prognostication tools used by Kayak and Bing, which advise travelers whether to buy plane tickets while searching those websites or to wait. Both sites use data from scores of past searches to predict whether you're finding a fare at its lowest point or whether it may fall. I examined 10 random routes and dates of travel, and the companies were generally united on their predictions, with one exception: For a hypothetical trip from Los Angeles to Portland, Ore., in mid-April, Bing and Kayak both brought back the same fare - $178 on both Delta and Alaska airlines - but differed in their recommendations.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Austin-based writer-director Bob Byington's "Somebody Up There Likes Me" is a difficult film to describe, but easily inspires a deep sense of affection and connection. Words such as offbeat, charming or, Lord help us, quirky are wildly overused and yet this is exactly the kind of film to which they best apply. Covering some 35 years, with animated transitional sequences, the story follows Max Youngman (Keith Poulson) and his reluctant only friend Sal ("Parks and Recreation" costar Nick Offerman, also a producer)
OPINION
May 27, 2012 | By Meg Jay
It's graduation time again, and according to the National Center for Education Statistics, about 1.78 million students will walk across a stage and pick up a college diploma. Then they will face terrifying statistics about employment, pressure to make their 20s the best years of their lives, and slogans that suggest that what you do right after college may not matter anyway. What not enough graduates are hearing, however, is that - recession or not - our 20s are life's developmental sweet spot.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Austin-based writer-director Bob Byington's "Somebody Up There Likes Me" is a difficult film to describe, but easily inspires a deep sense of affection and connection. Words such as offbeat, charming or, Lord help us, quirky are wildly overused and yet this is exactly the kind of film to which they best apply. Covering some 35 years, with animated transitional sequences, the story follows Max Youngman (Keith Poulson) and his reluctant only friend Sal ("Parks and Recreation" costar Nick Offerman, also a producer)
FOOD
February 23, 2013 | By David Karp
The Irvine Saturday farmers market is the largest and best in Orange County, but it's a mixed bag. It has some worthy local small farmers who come in person, along with more commercial farms, and even a few who have been sanctioned previously for cheating by agricultural authorities or other managers. Orange County Produce, owned by the family of the previous California agriculture secretary, A.G. Kawamura, farms on remnants of undeveloped local land, a bittersweet reminder of the county's past agricultural glory.
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