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Sweetheart Deal

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1986 | FRANK del OLMO, Frank del Olmo is a Times editorial writer.
Earlier this year, when the federal government moved to break up the nation's premier Spanish-language television network, Latinos cried foul, claiming that 18 million Latinos would be deprived of a unique and valuable community resource. I wasn't convinced. Now some recent actions by its owners and executives are supporting my doubts that the Spanish International Network will vanish from U.S. screens, or even change very much from what it is now.
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SPORTS
August 2, 2010 | By Diane Pucin
One of Lance Armstrong's attorneys Monday said the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency has contacted cyclists and offered them reduced suspensions if they can provide evidence implicating the legendary rider in doping. Tim Herman, a lawyer from Austin, Texas, who represents the seven-time winner of the Tour de France, declined to name the riders who have been approached, saying only that he has become aware of USADA offering what he termed "sweetheart deals" to them if they testify or otherwise tie Armstrong to cheating.
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BUSINESS
August 13, 1999 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Duchovny, star of the popular TV series "The X-Files," has sued 20th Century Fox Film Corp., producer of the weekly thriller, alleging that Fox gave its broadcast stations and its FX cable channel sweetheart licensing terms rather than seeking the highest bid in a competitive auction.
SPORTS
October 28, 2006
Mr. Goodell, we see you working. So now it is too expensive to put an expansion team in L.A. How long did it take you guys to come up with that one? A couple of years ago we had millionaires and billionaires lining up to purchase an expansion team. You try to double-dip by taking Houston's money and then sell used goods. The city should give you the middle finger salute by bringing back the Raiders and Al Davis on a sweetheart deal. WILLIS BARTON Los Angeles The Dodgers will defeat the Angels to win the Fall Classic, Karl Dorrell will guide the Bruins to the national championship on the gridiron and Tim Floyd will do likewise for the Trojans on the hardwood (in the same year)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1990 | TONY MARCANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Self-described gigolo Joseph (Mac) Duffy, who allegedly has bilked women all over the world of $160,000, was released from jail Wednesday under a strict, three-year probation agreement. Duffy, who pleaded guilty to four counts of grand theft for con schemes in Orange County, was given a two-year state prison sentence by Superior Court Judge Richard L. Weatherspoon. The sentence was suspended under the terms of the probation agreement, said Deputy Dist. Atty. Jeff Ferguson.
OPINION
February 25, 2005
In the Feb. 22 article, "States' Private Pensions Make a Weak Showing," bashing Social Security reform, The Times details how government workers in several states shun private accounts in favor of their existing pension plans. One reason for this is that state worker pensions are outrageously generous. In L.A. County, for example, public workers can retire at age 60 with pensions substantially higher than their final month's pay. Who would gamble with anything, given a sweetheart deal like that?
OPINION
August 25, 2006
Re "Casino Tribes Try to Keep Entire Pot," Aug. 22 The sorry state of Indian gaming in California shows once again that complex laws should be handled by the Legislature and not by passing an all-or-nothing ballot proposition. The gaming tribes wrote themselves a sweetheart deal that is extremely favorable to them, and then played on the sympathies of the California voters to get their proposition passed. That proposition has created a small pocket of very wealthy Indians but provided little benefit to the vast majority of California Indians.
SPORTS
October 28, 2006
Mr. Goodell, we see you working. So now it is too expensive to put an expansion team in L.A. How long did it take you guys to come up with that one? A couple of years ago we had millionaires and billionaires lining up to purchase an expansion team. You try to double-dip by taking Houston's money and then sell used goods. The city should give you the middle finger salute by bringing back the Raiders and Al Davis on a sweetheart deal. WILLIS BARTON Los Angeles The Dodgers will defeat the Angels to win the Fall Classic, Karl Dorrell will guide the Bruins to the national championship on the gridiron and Tim Floyd will do likewise for the Trojans on the hardwood (in the same year)
OPINION
November 19, 1995
Gary Gilbar's plea for a sports complex next to the Convention Center Downtown (Commentary, Nov. 13) may be heartfelt, but economically it is surely misguided. It's grossly imprudent to suggest that, facing hospital closures, school cutbacks and underfunded libraries, the City of Los Angeles try to woo a football team to Downtown. Contrary to Gilbar's assertions, there's no clear indication that a new football team would be a financial boon--the economics of professional sports suggest that teams sap business from competing forms of entertainment, instead of expanding the pie; and it's naive to think that a football team can substitute for industry in revitalizing an underutilized portion of the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2000
Re "Exemplary Redevelopment," Ventura County editorial, July 30. I couldn't believe my eyes when read this editorial about the [Rick J.] Caruso sweetheart deal. I am further horrified that you bought this city's line that to oppose any of their tax-and-waste schemes is a sign of a naysayer who does not understand government accounting. What were the issues that riled so many of us? The process is what is so important, and it was hijacked by the city. For more than a decade, we have been trying to do something positive for this extra land that the city purchased on the promise that it would sell the old city hall and this land and build a new city hall free and clear of debt.
OPINION
August 25, 2006
Re "Casino Tribes Try to Keep Entire Pot," Aug. 22 The sorry state of Indian gaming in California shows once again that complex laws should be handled by the Legislature and not by passing an all-or-nothing ballot proposition. The gaming tribes wrote themselves a sweetheart deal that is extremely favorable to them, and then played on the sympathies of the California voters to get their proposition passed. That proposition has created a small pocket of very wealthy Indians but provided little benefit to the vast majority of California Indians.
OPINION
February 25, 2005
In the Feb. 22 article, "States' Private Pensions Make a Weak Showing," bashing Social Security reform, The Times details how government workers in several states shun private accounts in favor of their existing pension plans. One reason for this is that state worker pensions are outrageously generous. In L.A. County, for example, public workers can retire at age 60 with pensions substantially higher than their final month's pay. Who would gamble with anything, given a sweetheart deal like that?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2003 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
A group of business leaders in October offered the best of both worlds to cash-hungry college officials who put their television station up for sale over the summer: a bid comparable to other proposals that also would preserve Orange County's only public TV channel. But the final deal between the Coast Community College District and the KOCE-TV Foundation, outlined this month, has turned out to be less lucrative than it first appeared.
NATIONAL
November 7, 2003 | Nick Anderson, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration and senior Republican lawmakers agreed Thursday to buy, rather than lease, 80 new aerial refueling tankers for the Air Force after critics complained that the government was giving Boeing Co. a sweetheart deal for a fleet of 767 jetliners. Pentagon officials, who had proposed a long-term plan to lease 100 of the planes, acceded to demands from congressional critics to restructure the controversial, highly unusual $21-billion deal.
SPORTS
March 17, 2003 | Bill Dwyre, Times Staff Writer
It must be great these days being Lleyton Hewitt, tennis star. You wake up Sunday morning in a Southern California desert resort hotel, where the rain that had waited until you finished your semifinal Saturday -- but disrupted your opponent's -- has cleared things out for yet another chamber-of-commerce day. You get to the locker room in time to watch your girlfriend win $332,000 when her opponent hits 10 double faults and slaps a routine overhead wide on match point.
OPINION
November 3, 2002
Re "Lockyer Critical of D.A.'s Actions," Oct. 23: I am incredulous over the amount of time, energy and taxpayer money the "sore-losers club" in Orange County spends in attempts to thwart the publicly elected and "right acting/right thinking" district attorney, Tony Rackauckas and his office. When will you quit harassing Rackauckas and let him be as productive as we have elected him to be? Enough is enough. Le McClellan Corona del Mar Re "Deputy D.A. Resigns Over Arco Gas Case," Oct. 26: Rackauckas is out of control and out of touch with his sworn duties.
OPINION
November 3, 2002
Re "Lockyer Critical of D.A.'s Actions," Oct. 23: I am incredulous over the amount of time, energy and taxpayer money the "sore-losers club" in Orange County spends in attempts to thwart the publicly elected and "right acting/right thinking" district attorney, Tony Rackauckas and his office. When will you quit harassing Rackauckas and let him be as productive as we have elected him to be? Enough is enough. Le McClellan Corona del Mar Re "Deputy D.A. Resigns Over Arco Gas Case," Oct. 26: Rackauckas is out of control and out of touch with his sworn duties.
SPORTS
June 10, 1996 | Mike Penner
The dumbest moment in Clipper history, a pop quiz: (Employees of the Los Angeles Clippers basketball organization, and their families, not eligible.) a) Owner Donald Sterling suggests his team lose as many games down the stretch as possible in order to clinch the No. 1 draft pick ("Maybe I have to lose the battle to win the war") and is fined $10,000 as Clippers finish the 1981-82 season 17-65.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2002 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Sen. Richard Polanco (D-Los Angeles) charged Friday that taxpayers and state services for senior citizens and children are threatened by a giveaway contract negotiated by the Davis administration and California's prison guards union. Polanco, who has sparred with the union before, criticized the agreement at the outset of a hearing on Gov. Gray Davis' proposed budget for the Department of Corrections, whose current spending is $277 million in the red.
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