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SPORTS
July 2, 2007 | Mike Hiserman, Times Staff Writer
As some of the top swimmers in the world gathered at the Santa Clara International Invitational over the weekend, the hot topic was a woman whose best days -- competing in the pool anyway -- are probably behind her. Amanda Beard's Playboy pictorial was all the rage. Asked whether she would consider posing nude, Leisel Jones of Australia, world champion in the breast stroke, laughed and told Times reporter Lisa Dillman, "I don't think I have the body for it. She's got the looks; she can do it."
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BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
Danny Pudi, who stars on the show “Community,” has bought the Pasadena home of Olympic gold medalist swimmer Betsy Mitchell for $1.32 million. The 1925 house, near Caltech and the Huntington Library, retains original architectural details such as interior arches but has an updated kitchen and bathrooms. The living room, off the formal entry, has a barrel ceiling, red tile flooring and a fireplace. French doors in the formal dining and family rooms open to outdoor patio space.
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NEWS
December 13, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Remember those full-body high-tech swimsuits worn at the 2009 World Swimming Championships in Rome--the event that saw an unprecedented 43 world records set? A study examining the event finds that the suits may have offered a distinct advantage. This isn't the first time the polyurethane suits have been implicated in allowing swimmers to break so many records; after it was alleged that the suits decreased drag through the water, compressed the muscles and increased buoyancy, they were banned from competition.
SCIENCE
March 3, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
Wait three days after it rains before going into the ocean. It's a warning that public health officials issued to beachgoers this week, as they do after any significant storm in California. But a study released Monday is raising questions about whether that three-day waiting period is enough to protect people who swim, surf and play in the ocean from pathogens in storm runoff that can make them ill. "To err on the side of caution, stay out of the water for five days after rainfall," said Amanda Griesbach, a water quality scientist at Heal the Bay , an environmental group that provided data and other support for the research by undergraduate students at the UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Athletes, journalists and fans aren't the only ones who have been tweeting from the London Olympics. For a more surreal look at the games, consider following the Twitter feed of the Olympic pool camera: @L2012PoolCam . That's right, a camera stationed at the bottom of the Olympic pool has been tweeting pictures of the world's fastest swimmers as they cut through the water, and the photos are eerie, gorgeous and awesome. "I match the world's best swimmers, stroke for stroke," the pool camera's Twitter bio reads.
WORLD
December 26, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
A school of carnivorous fish attacked hundreds of Argentines cooling off in a river near the city of Rosario, sending at least 70 to local clinics and emergency rooms for treatment. The attack by palometas, a type of piranha, occurred as city dwellers attempted to escape the 100-degree heat of Christmas Day in the Southern Hemisphere's summer season. "There were some people that the fish literally had torn bits of flesh from," a medical official at the scene, Gustavo Centurion, was quoted as saying by the Latin Times newspaper.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2010 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
The fog, the frigid water, the jellyfish, a hot tub that suddenly went cold: Despite the countless terrors of the deep, six Ventura County swimmers are trying to break a world's record and reach La Jolla the long way, stroke by stroke. The "Deep Six," as they call themselves, are members of the Ventura County Masters swim club. They're 40 to 59 years old, and since dawn Thursday, each has put in a grueling hour at a time in the Pacific Ocean before being hauled onto an accompanying 129-foot charter yacht.
SPORTS
January 20, 1985
UC Irvine's swim teams split nonconference dual meets against Claremont Saturday in Irvine. The Anteater men, despite victories in the one- and three-meter diving by Jim Gray, lost 60-48. The women won, 97-14.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2013 | By Tiffany Kelly and Jason Wells
A bear who sent swimmers scurrying for cover as it lumbered through La Cañada Flintridge will be relocated deep in the forest, officials said. With helicopters tracking its movements, officials were able to tranquilize the bear shortly after 3:30 p.m. Monday, more than an hour after it was first reported near Viro Road and Crown Avenue. Television news footage showed the bear - which officials described as a 1-year-old female - move lazily across the neighborhood, stopping briefly out of sight in trees as officials moved in. At least two swimmers were seen bolting for a house after the bear popped over the fence during its jaunt.
SPORTS
September 17, 1994
Gil Wong (Letters, Sept. 10) has it wrong. Racism or anti-Asian bias is not the reason American media, athletes and coaches are so suspicious of the performance of Chinese women swimmers at the World Championships in Rome. The reason is quite simple: They've been caught cheating in the past and there are ample grounds for suspicion that they're up to their old tricks again. BILL BELL Los Angeles
WORLD
December 26, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
A school of carnivorous fish attacked hundreds of Argentines cooling off in a river near the city of Rosario, sending at least 70 to local clinics and emergency rooms for treatment. The attack by palometas, a type of piranha, occurred as city dwellers attempted to escape the 100-degree heat of Christmas Day in the Southern Hemisphere's summer season. "There were some people that the fish literally had torn bits of flesh from," a medical official at the scene, Gustavo Centurion, was quoted as saying by the Latin Times newspaper.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
After swimming from Cuba to Florida in a record-breaking trip that took more than four days, 64-year old Diana Nyad said, "you're never too old to chase your dream. " She's now got a chance to put that in writing -- she'll be publishing a memoir with Knopf, the publisher announced Monday. "At first blush, this sounds like the story of an epic endurance achievement," Nyad said in a statement. "But the narrative will follow that drama and expose a lifelong search for meaning ... a hope that life is richer for reaching for the stars, a belief that the noble goal is to arrive at the end with no regrets.
NEWS
September 3, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
Last month, some publications proclaimed a trio of young female swimmers the stars of their sport after the teenagers set world records at the FINA world championships in Barcelona, Spain. But Monday, it was 64-year-old Diana Nyad who captured the world's attention, becoming the first person to successfully swim the treacherous 110-mile stretch of ocean that divides Cuba and the United States without a shark cage. It's a remarkable feat, made even more noteworthy given that swimming is so often considered a sport that favors the young.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2013 | By James Rainey and Adolfo Flores
  Diana Nyad, the 64-year-old endurance swimmer who on Monday became the first person to swim from Cuba to Florida without a shark cage,   trained for years at the Rose Bowl Aquatics Center in Pasadena. As soon as news broke that Nyad had finally completed the feat, on her fifth attempt, her fellow Rose Bowl Swmmers celebrated her and marveled that they had been able to witness her perseverance and commitment as she swam a seemingly endless series of laps in the narrow gutter lane closest to the wall of the 50-meter pool.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2013 | By Gale Holland
On the last big weekend of the summer, bay waters from the Upper Newport Bay to Newport Dunes remain closed to swimming, diving and other recreational uses because of a sewage spill, officials said Sunday. The closure was ordered after a spill Saturday and remains in effect until further notice. Any updates will be posted on Orange County's ocean water protection program site . ALSO: Weather to cool for Labor Day, then heat up  Yosemite fire in the top ten; what are the other nine?
WORLD
August 26, 2013 | By Alexandra Zavis
Police in Australia say they have recovered the body of a man who attempted to swim across a crocodile-infested river in the Northern Territory. Sean Cole, 26, from Darwin, was attending a birthday party Saturday night at the Mary River Wilderness Retreat when he and a friend decided to go for a swim, the Australian Broadcasting Corp. reported . Horrified partygoers described seeing a crocodile drag Cole under the water, then swim upstream with his body in its jaws, Northern Territory police told the broadcaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
Health officials on Monday warned swimmers, surfers and others to avoid going into the ocean near the mouths of rivers, creeks and channels in the aftermath of Sunday's rainstorms. Runoff often contains bacteria at unsanitary levels. Also, a sewage spill led the agency Friday to close indefinitely a section of Huntington Harbour to swimming and diving. The area is Admiralty Drive Channel between Bounty and Easter circles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1996
We wish to congratulate one of Ventura's own championship divers, Troy Dumais, for his outstanding achievement at the 1996 Olympics Diving Trials in Indianapolis. His backward 3 1/2 dive, with a degree of difficulty of 3.3, earned him a perfect score of 10 from all seven judges. This was the only dive at the trials that was judged a 10. At 16, Troy was the youngest competitor at the trials. He was only outscored by two other divers, but he had more points than 11 of the other competitors.
NEWS
August 15, 2013 | By David Wharton
With the furor over Russian anti-gay legislation and concerns over whether Rio de Janeiro can get its act together, you'd think the Olympic movement has enough on its hands. Now comes word that officials have banned a paraplegic American swimmer from the Paralympic world championships in Montreal. Victoria Arlen slipped into a coma at 11 and awoke three years later to find that she was paralyzed from the waist down because of an autoimmune disorder that attacks nerves in the spine.
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