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NEWS
November 14, 1988
Helvetia Boswell, the sole surviving member of the Boswell Sisters, a popular 1930s trio whose innovative vocal arrangements helped introduce swing music and paved the way for singing stars such as Ella Fitzgerald, the Mills Brothers and the Andrews Sisters, died Saturday in New York. She was 77. Her daughter said she had been hospitalized for pneumonia.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2011 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Los Angeles Times
Docked in San Pedro, the Lane Victory has long been designated a historic landmark for its service in the Korean War, the Vietnam War and World War II. But the hulking 455-foot-long gray cargo ship rarely sees open water these days. So when the vessel pulled out of the channel Saturday morning and headed toward Santa Catalina Island, Ralph Wetterhahn declared that the Lane Victory was now alive. "Seeing this thing go to sea — when you crank up those boilers and those props start to turn — she's got life," said Wetterhahn, 69, a Vietnam War veteran who helped with Saturday's trip.
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NEWS
October 30, 1987 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
Woody Herman, who prevailed for decades as a top swing band leader only to become in his final days a sad figure overwhelmed by debilitating illness and a crushing debt to the federal government, died Thursday afternoon. He was 74 and died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center where he had been since Oct. 1, suffering from congestive heart failure, emphysema and pneumonia. The famed clarinetist and jazz innovator had been on a life-support system.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
You might want to tuck Damien Chazelle's name into your memory bank if his filmmaking debut, the terrific jazz improvisation that is "Guy and Madeline on a Park Bench," is any indication of what his future might hold. How many 25-year-old indie directors choose to channel 1930s B-grade Hollywood musicals into a contemporary, tap-dancing love story, with nearly all of its very limited budget poured into paying the Bratislava Symphony Orchestra (yes, you read that correctly) to play the smoky original score created by a talented friend?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1998 | JAMES E. FOWLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Singer Carrie James is excited. And she has good reasons to be. James and her band will perform for the first time at B.B. King's this Friday, opening for world-famous blues man James Harman. "We're really excited about it," James said. "We're going to have some fun that night." Also, the Carrie James Band's first CD, "Midnight Road," was released about three months ago and it's doing pretty well. It has received good reviews and airplay on KLOS-FM and college radio stations across the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Swing Night" at the Hollywood Bowl Friday and Saturday had a lot less to do with swing music than it did with Duke Ellington. That was all to the good, since the swing-era segments--the first featuring singer James Naughton, the second showcasing the Royal Crown Revue--left much to be desired. And although Ellington's music can hardly be considered representative of the swing era, we can never really hear too much of it, especially in this centennial year of his birth.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1998 | Elysa Gardner, Elysa Gardner is a regular contributor to Calendar from New York
Among the nearly 3,000 fans who have packed the Hammerstein Ballroom in midtown Manhattan to watch the Brian Setzer Orchestra perform is a 72-year-old man whose grandson bought him tickets. The gray-haired fellow had never heard of Setzer before, and has no knowledge of the Stray Cats, the neo-rockabilly outfit that the singer-guitarist led to fame in the early '80s. "That was after my time," the septuagenarian says with a chuckle. "But I hear he plays swing now.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1990 | Don Heckman
Jon Holiday's belief that swing music spans nearly sixty years is supported by the following sequence of recordings from one of his "Swing Era II" broadcasts. "Opus 1," Tommy Dorsey Orchestra (1945). "Gigi," Steve Lawrence (1963). "All of Me," the Billy May Orchestra (1955) "Tuxedo Junction," Manhattan Transfer (1975). "I Can't Get Started," Bunny Berigan (1938). "Cheek To Cheek," Ray Anthony Orchestra (1956). "When My Sugar Walks Down The Street," Nat "King" Cole (1961).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2000
Get ready to cut a rug! The Royal Crown Revue performs Sunday in Newhall. Since the late 1980s, this group has been at the forefront of the swing music revival. Besides its music, the horn-driven Los Angeles-based ensemble is known for its snappy 1940s-style attire. * Royal Crown Revue, Sunday, 5:30 p.m., Newhall Park, 24933 Newhall Ave.; free; (661) 298-ARTS. Jazz Tommy Newsome, formerly of the "Tonight Show" band, will give a free concert in Woodland Hills.
NEWS
September 8, 1996 | MARK EHRMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a warm summer night on a rooftop in downtown's gritty loft district, an incongruously elegant ritual is about to begin. There's a long, candlelit table set for a formal dinner for 40. Oases of potted plants in each corner of the roof form an organic barrier separating this scene from the urban visual drama beyond. To the west, under a crescent moon, there is downtown's imposing skyline. Farther north, a ring of lights outlines the upper perimeter of Dodger Stadium.
SPORTS
June 3, 2010 | By Mike Bresnahan
Turn up the Perry Como . Listen to a little Glenn Miller . Oddly enough, or not at all when considering the protagonist, Lakers forward and occasional rapper Ron Artest was fired up by 1940s swing music going into Game 1 of the NBA Finals. Something certainly worked for Artest, who continued his recent hot hand by scoring 15 points and making three of five three-point attempts in the Lakers' 102-89 victory Thursday over the Boston Celtics. Maybe it was the more mellow music.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2004 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
The musical fantasy "Swing" aims for lush, follow-your-bliss romanticism, but plays out like a lame cross between a Gap commercial and "Cocoon." It takes a "Twilight Zone"-lite premise and spins it into the ground with addlebrained glee. Painfully sincere in its approach, the movie chugs along with such precise, choreographed steps that there's nary a surprise to be found along the way.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2000
Get ready to cut a rug! The Royal Crown Revue performs Sunday in Newhall. Since the late 1980s, this group has been at the forefront of the swing music revival. Besides its music, the horn-driven Los Angeles-based ensemble is known for its snappy 1940s-style attire. * Royal Crown Revue, Sunday, 5:30 p.m., Newhall Park, 24933 Newhall Ave.; free; (661) 298-ARTS. Jazz Tommy Newsome, formerly of the "Tonight Show" band, will give a free concert in Woodland Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2000
* Gamelan Concert--Cliff De Arment and the musicians of Bali & Beyond will perform two gamelan concerts Saturday at the Japanese Gardens in Van Nuys. Gamelan is the traditional music of Bali, Indonesia, and is known for its hard-driving, almost rock-like percussive pulse. De Arment and his group, all of whom are American, learned the style of music at California Institute of the Arts in Valencia. Show times: 1:30 and 4 p.m. The gardens are at 6100 Woodley Ave. No children under 10.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Swing Night" at the Hollywood Bowl Friday and Saturday had a lot less to do with swing music than it did with Duke Ellington. That was all to the good, since the swing-era segments--the first featuring singer James Naughton, the second showcasing the Royal Crown Revue--left much to be desired. And although Ellington's music can hardly be considered representative of the swing era, we can never really hear too much of it, especially in this centennial year of his birth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1999 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN
The atmosphere didn't exactly have the feel of New York City's Savoy Theater back in the late 1920s. Then again, it didn't much matter to more than two dozen couples who jumped, jived and flipped their way through a Sunday afternoon swing competition before hundreds of transfixed shoppers at the Fashion Square shopping mall. Sixteen competitors squared off for the right to strut their stuff at the Hollywood Bowl's "Great American Concert--Swing Night" Sept. 10 and 11.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2000
* Gamelan Concert--Cliff De Arment and the musicians of Bali & Beyond will perform two gamelan concerts Saturday at the Japanese Gardens in Van Nuys. Gamelan is the traditional music of Bali, Indonesia, and is known for its hard-driving, almost rock-like percussive pulse. De Arment and his group, all of whom are American, learned the style of music at California Institute of the Arts in Valencia. Show times: 1:30 and 4 p.m. The gardens are at 6100 Woodley Ave. No children under 10.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1993 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Imagine this scene in a '30s cartoon: A beat-up old nag hobbles to the starting gate, and when the race starts it becomes a streak of lightning and wins going away. On the other side of the finish line, it sags again and resumes its creaky gait. That's sort of how Asleep at the Wheel's show at the Crazy Horse Steak House on Monday went. When the veteran band played its Western swing and boogie-woogie tunes, things sailed along nicely.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1999 | RACHEL FISCHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you already know how to swing dance, if your moves are so smooth they put the cast of the movie "Swingers" to shame, then read no further. You belong with the other "trend-ites" at Los Feliz's The Derby, where the considerable skills demonstrated on the dance floor are only overshadowed by the style with which the beautiful regulars pair retro suits and saddle shoes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1999 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rules are rigid: The woman never makes a move unless the man tells her to, and he alone determines what she'll do and when. If she jumps the gun or doesn't follow his directive, he might drop her for somebody else. What's this? Cro-Magnon cave ethics? Nope. It's the way of swing dance, whose raging popularity might lead a visitor from outer space to believe we'd never burned our bras. Here's the deal: Like the waltz and fox trot, and even the hipper salsa, swing's a lead-and-follow dance.
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