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OPINION
December 12, 2010 | Doyle McManus
Much of the noise in Washington last week came from liberal Democrats furious that President Obama made a deal with Republicans to extend tax cuts for wealthy Americans. The liberals' anger was understandable; they weren't even in the room when the deal was made. But Obama's compromise is likely to be popular among independents, and that has to matter almost as much for the president. After all, last month's election confirmed an ancient lesson in American politics: Most campaigns are won in the center, among independent and swing voters who are neither reliably liberal nor deeply conservative.
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BUSINESS
January 21, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The future of public-sector labor unions may rest with conservative Justice Antonin Scalia. On Tuesday, the Supreme Court debated whether teachers and other public employees should continue to be required to pay union fees, even if they don't join or support its activities. Since a 1977 ruling, the high court has upheld such mandatory fees, known as "fair-share" dues. But in recent years, some justices have raised doubts about whether the practice violates the First Amendment, and during oral arguments several conservatives appeared ready to strike it down.
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NEWS
May 20, 1988 | Associated Press
Latinos have a swing-vote potential that could affect the results of a close presidential race in several states, according to a study released Thursday. The study, sponsored by the National Assn. of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, said Latino voters can influence the selection of 71% of the 270 electoral votes needed to win the presidency. "The Hispanic vote has the potential of being a true swing vote in 1988," said Harry Pachon, the association's national director.
OPINION
June 22, 2013 | By Adam Winkler
Despite the conservative tilt of the Roberts Supreme Court, gay rights supporters expect the justices to strike down the Defense of Marriage Act this month. Their hopes are pinned on Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, the court's usual swing vote, who has written two important pro-gay-rights opinions in the past and voiced skepticism of the law during the court's hearing in March. If he joins the court's four liberals, DOMA is history. Kennedy, however, could surprise the court watchers.
OPINION
March 1, 2008 | TIM RUTTEN
Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton and her advisors have referred to next week's Texas and Ohio primaries as her campaign's "firewall" against Sen. Barack Obama's surging popularity. In both states, the New York senator's barrier is built on the same foundation -- the Catholic vote, and that fact has intriguing implications well beyond the primaries. Today, one in four Americans is a Roman Catholic.
NEWS
May 29, 1988 | CATHLEEN DECKER, Times Staff Writer
Stanley Gajkowski can decide George Bush's fate this November, so it was bad news for the vice president recently when Gajkowski stood in Buffalo, N.Y., rooting for Bush's probable Democratic foe, Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis. Gajkowski, a 42-year-old maintenance supervisor, is a swing Democrat, the sort who for two elections now has slipped across party lines to sweep Ronald Reagan into the winner's circle and in 1988 threatens to sweep Bush out of it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1996
The Orange County Board of Supervisors today will review a plan to build up to 318 houses in Trabuco Canyon in a project that has become one of the most controversial in recent memory. A divided Orange County Planning Commission failed to reach an agreement on the development, Saddleback Meadows, in July, thus requiring the supervisors to decide the issue. The developer, Aradi Inc., wants to build 318 homes, while a planning staff alternative recommended a maximum of 299.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1986 | HEIDI EVANS, Times Staff Writer
At an election night party celebrating the council victories of slow-growth candidates Larry Agran and Ed Dornan, an exuberant homeowner shouted to Irvine Councilman Ray Catalano: "Isn't this going to be terrific?" Catalano shot back with a smile, "It's not going to be much fun being in the middle."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2001 | JAMES P. PINKERTON, James P. Pinkerton, who writes a column for Newsday in New York, worked in the White House of former President George Bush. E-mail: pinkerto@ix.netcom.com
The policies that President Bush and the Europeans are haggling over may be complicated, but the politics are relatively simple. World politics. Today, world politics is a game of two-out-of-three--the three players being the U.S., the European Union and China. As such, Bush has no choice but to be solicitous of the Europeans because they, sitting in the middle, are the swing vote. They hold the balance of power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1991 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
With so few voters expected to cast ballots in Tuesday's special 35th Senate District election, political strategists figure it may be that Mother Nature will actually decide who wins the seat. In this strange but competitive race to replace former Anaheim state Sen. John Seymour, campaign officials said they are expecting one of the lowest voter turnouts ever in Orange County, at the same time that they are seeing the largest number of absentee ballots ever filed in a special election.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg
In one Florida county, voters were wrongly told they could vote the day after the election. In storm-racked New Jersey, emergency plans to allow email voting proved too popular for election officials to handle. In Pennsylvania and Ohio, a variety of problems raised questions about the integrity of the vote. Although most Americans cast ballots without incident Tuesday, there were enough glitches to cause concern among voting rights activists and to provide work for some of the thousands of lawyers who were standing by, representing parties, candidates and nonpartisan voter advocacy groups.
NATIONAL
October 22, 2012 | By Paul West and Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
BOCA RATON, Fla. - Foreign policy may be the topic, but undecided voters will be the targets when Mitt Romney and President Obama hold their third and final debate Monday night. Mobilizing supporters is a priority for both men. It is especially vital for Obama, whose backers are less likely to vote than Romney's, polls indicate. But with the latest opinion surveys showing the race dead even, it is increasingly likely that the next president will be chosen by a relatively tiny group: swing-state voters who have yet to commit firmly to either candidate.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2012 | By David G. Savage and Noam N. Levey, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The legal fate of President Obama's embattled healthcare law has always turned on winning over the center of the Supreme Court: JusticeAnthony M. Kennedy. But as the court considered whether the federal government could require most Americans to get health insurance, Kennedy appeared to deal the president and his allies a heavy blow. The mandate, he said, "changes the relationship of the federal government to the individual in a very fundamental way. " Kennedy called the insurance requirement "concerning" and suggested it might be "unprecedented.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2012 | By John Hoeffel, Los Angeles Times
In the fading evening light, Jeff Snider played catch in the middle of the street with his 14-year-old son, the baseball thwacking their mitts. They stepped out of the way and waved when cars passed. The friendly neighborhoods in hilly Oakwood, a picture-perfect suburb nestled against Dayton, belong in a brochure for the American Dream. But the tranquillity hides a churning discontent. A lanky high school math teacher, Snider worries about the mortgage and the cost of sending four children to college.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
Rick Santorum is winning the hearts of conservative voters with uncompromising social views that, he says, are drawn from the same well as his fiscal and environmental policies: a reading of America's founding documents that stresses their Judeo-Christian underpinnings. In friendly settings around the country, in hotel ballrooms and public school auditoriums, Santorum has framed the 2012 election as one for the very salvation of the country and its culture. "Ladies and gentlemen, this is about foundational things," he told a Republican gathering in Phoenix on Tuesday, one day before a debate with the remaining GOP candidates in Mesa, Ariz.
OPINION
December 12, 2010 | Doyle McManus
Much of the noise in Washington last week came from liberal Democrats furious that President Obama made a deal with Republicans to extend tax cuts for wealthy Americans. The liberals' anger was understandable; they weren't even in the room when the deal was made. But Obama's compromise is likely to be popular among independents, and that has to matter almost as much for the president. After all, last month's election confirmed an ancient lesson in American politics: Most campaigns are won in the center, among independent and swing voters who are neither reliably liberal nor deeply conservative.
NEWS
September 4, 1988 | ROBERT SCHEER, Times Staff Writer
When all the balloons have been popped, and the little flags waved, what the Democratic and Republican conventions have left American voters to choose among are four millionaires trumpeting the cause of the common man. Publicly, the old rhetoric of conservative versus liberal survives, supplemented by petty attacks on a candidate's height or patriotism or manliness. But the substantive differences between Democrat Michael S.
NEWS
December 16, 1987 | KEITH LOVE, Times Political Writer
People are suffering in the Rio Grande Valley, where unemployment is approaching 20% in some counties, so six Democratic candidates found a sympathetic audience Tuesday night for their programmatic approaches to economic problems. And what was expected to be a major distraction at the debate here at Pan American University--the re-entry of Gary Hart into the Democratic race--never developed, because the debate's sponsors decided that Hart's announcement was irrelevant.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2010 | By Kim Geiger and Tom Hamburger
As President Obama pushes for a prompt up or down vote on his health initiative, lobbyists and activist groups on both sides of the issue have launched grass-roots and high-dollar advertising campaigns on the roughly two dozen members of Congress who may be the final swing votes on the controversial issue. At the headquarters of Americans for Tax Reform, 200 conservative activists received briefings on the message that will be carried to the home districts of key House Democrats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2009 | Jean Merl
He's just 26 and making his first election bid in a crowded field of candidates that includes two seasoned, well-financed officeholders -- just the sort of hopeful who usually gets lost in the pack. But Emanuel Pleitez has collected enough money -- much of it in online donations from across the nation -- to put on a substantive mail campaign, bolstered by an energetic staff of young volunteers.
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