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Swiss Alps

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NEWS
January 8, 1989 | Associated Press
A pre-dawn earthquake with a magnitude of 3.8 jolted the Swiss Alps in the vicinity of the ski resort of Crans-Montana on Saturday, but no major damage was reported, authorities said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 31, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Is wearing a kimono as a Halloween costume offensive ? Pottery Barn withdrew two costumes it had marketed - a kimono and sushi chef - after objections from Asian American groups. It's related to a larger campaign against ethnic costuming that was started by Ohio University students several years ago, using the motto "We're a culture, not a costume” and advising people who would buy outfits such as kimonos or sombreros,  "You wear the costume for one night. I wear the stigma for life.
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TRAVEL
December 9, 1990 | LUCY IZON
Traveling through Europe on limited funds doesn't mean that skiing in the Swiss Alps is an impossibility. Two free publications, available through the Swiss National Tourist Office, offer information to help the budget traveler determine what ski rentals and lift fees will cost, and which resorts offer low-cost accommodations geared to young, international travelers.
SCIENCE
September 4, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Black soot from 19th century homes and factories in Europe hastened the end of the Little Ice Age and caused glaciers in the Alps to retreat decades sooner than they would have otherwise, according to a new study. The black carbon particles caused the snow to absorb more heat, speeding up the melting process. As a result, the glaciers beneath the snowpack were exposed earlier in the year, giving them more time to melt. And glacial ice melts faster than snow, because it is darker.
NEWS
April 2, 2006 | Sam Cage, Associated Press Writer
It's a pageant of devils and demons, virgins and Pontius Pilate. But this is no horror story or nightmare -- just a taste of the Alpine legends that lend their names to Switzerland's high mountains. It's unlikely that many visitors to the Alps, or even residents, give much thought to the names of the rocky heights. But closer investigation reveals tales of derring-do that add depth to darkly forested valleys and greater clarity to airy ridges.
NEWS
August 20, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Seven people were killed in rock and ice slides in the Swiss Alps, and a German climber was found dead on France's Mt. Blanc. A four-person mountain climbing party perished in an ice avalanche as its members climbed the northwest wall of the Taeschhorn at almost 14,000 feet above sea level, police said. And in another accident near the town of Zermatt, also in the southern Swiss canton of Valais, three workers were killed by a rockslide at 9,200 feet as they cleared a footpath, police said.
TRAVEL
January 18, 1987 | JERRY HULSE, Times Travel Editor
Get out the alpenhorn, maestro, it's one of those rare Sundays we devote to romantics. With the Alps as a backdrop, make it the theme from "The High and the Mighty." And excuse us if we get a trifle carried away. It's difficult not to become emotional in a setting that takes in Alpine meadows with magnificent peaks and clouds and the melody of cowbells ringing beside waterfalls that tumble eternally into valleys so distant they appear illusory.
TRAVEL
February 14, 1993 | Benjamin Epstein, Epstein is a free-lance writer based in Newport Beach.
Two Matterhorns in two weeks? The inspiration came at Disneyland on the occasion of the fifth birthday of a small friend, and just prior to a summer vacation in Europe with his mother. It was my first trip on Disney's version of the peak since the days when it was an "E-ticket" ride; it was the little boy's first trip ever on the ride, and he was understandably apprehensive.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2005 | Uta Harnischfeger, Associated Press
The massive mountains towering over Walenstadt inspired Johanna Spyri to create the beloved tale of Heidi and her life in the Swiss Alps. Now, 125 years after the children's classic was first published, a group of London and Swiss producers is staging "Heidi" in a new outdoors musical.
TRAVEL
June 30, 1996 | PAULA BOCK, Bock is a reporter for the Seattle Times
We took a dark-green train from Zurich to Chur, a bright-red train from Chur to Samedan and, finally, squeezed into a skinny, cherry rail car with wood slat seats and windows open to the warm smell of hay. The little engine whirred up to the Swiss mountain village of Pontresina and dumped us off--me, my husband, Tao, my mom and dad--hiking boots slung over our shoulders. It was summer. We had come to walk the Alpine paths while the wildflowers were in bloom.
SCIENCE
July 30, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
The Swiss daredevil and former fighter pilot known as "Jetman" made his first public flight in the U.S. on Monday, strapped to a jet-propelled wing he designed himself. In video taken after the flight over Wisconsin, 53-year-old Yves Rossy says his jet-powered creation "follows my moves. " "It's like when you are skiing," he says, "you do that move, and it turns. " Rossy's known for being the first person ever to fly using a jet-propelled wing. As his website details, he made his first official public flight in May 2008, flying over the Swiss Alps, followed by a flight over the English Channel in September that same year.
TRAVEL
October 28, 2012
Say no to brand-name hotel chains and resorts. Say yes to handpicked vacation accommodations with a sense of adventure. Name: WelcomeBeyond.com What it does: Showcases unusual or one-of-a-kind lodgings around the world. To book a stay, you make your first inquiry through the website, then make reservations directly with the property owner or manager. What's hot: You can find off-the-radar lodgings, such as a yurt in England, a breathtaking beach house in Kenya or an igloo in the Swiss Alps.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2010
At a glance TODAY National Assn. of Realtors releases existing-home sales for December. Quarterly earnings reports due from Amgen, Apple and Halliburton. TUESDAY Conference Board releases its consumer confidence index. Standard & Poor's/Case- Shiller releases an index of November home prices. Quarterly earnings reports due from Yahoo, Corning, Delta Air Lines, Travelers, U.S. Steel and Verizon Communications. WEDNESDAY President Obama delivers the State of the Union address.
WORLD
December 5, 2009 | By Henry Chu
It'd be hard to find an isolation as splendid as this one. The mountains are swathed in snow, the trees are flecked with white and the ski lodges are getting ready for high season. Film director Roman Polanski traded prison for a veritable winter wonderland Friday as he began an indefinite period of house arrest up in the Swiss Alps. Instead of a jail cell, Polanski now has free run of his three-story villa here in Gstaad. Instead of fellow inmates, the people around him include his wife and their two children.
OPINION
October 18, 2009 | DOYLE McMANUS
At least one country already has a healthcare plan roughly similar to the one President Obama and the Democrats have proposed, with universal coverage, a mandate that everyone buy insurance and a major role for private insurance companies: Switzerland. So I used part of a vacation last week to head for the Swiss Alps to observe the system in practice. Dr. Jean-Oscar Meile, 53, runs a tidy one-man practice in Melide, a suburb of Lugano in Switzerland's Italian-speaking south.
WORLD
February 1, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Riot police fired tear gas and water cannons at bottle-throwing leftist demonstrators in Geneva who protested against the annual World Economic Forum meeting in the Swiss Alps. Police chased black-clad protesters through narrow streets. The rally by hundreds of people was largely peaceful until police blocked a group from walking to the center of the city. The violence was far from the target of the protesters' anger, the World Economic Forum, an annual gathering of the world's business and political elite.
NEWS
May 14, 2006 | Sam Cage, Associated Press Writer
It's cold in the snow at 6,500 feet, even with sunshine pouring down from almost cloudless skies. Skiers schuss their way down for well-earned lunches. There's a smile on almost every face in this winter wonderland. Yet looking over the colossal sweep of the Aletsch glacier, a remnant of the Ice Age snaking down through a deep valley below the peaks of the Bernese Oberland, the picture appears far different -- and warmer. The river of ice has retreated 2.
NEWS
May 14, 2006 | Sam Cage, Associated Press Writer
It's cold in the snow at 6,500 feet, even with sunshine pouring down from almost cloudless skies. Skiers schuss their way down for well-earned lunches. There's a smile on almost every face in this winter wonderland. Yet looking over the colossal sweep of the Aletsch glacier, a remnant of the Ice Age snaking down through a deep valley below the peaks of the Bernese Oberland, the picture appears far different -- and warmer. The river of ice has retreated 2.
NEWS
April 2, 2006 | Sam Cage, Associated Press Writer
It's a pageant of devils and demons, virgins and Pontius Pilate. But this is no horror story or nightmare -- just a taste of the Alpine legends that lend their names to Switzerland's high mountains. It's unlikely that many visitors to the Alps, or even residents, give much thought to the names of the rocky heights. But closer investigation reveals tales of derring-do that add depth to darkly forested valleys and greater clarity to airy ridges.
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