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Swiss Army Knives

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BUSINESS
September 8, 1992 | From Associated Press
Got a bottle of wine but no corkscrew? Fresh bluefish, but nothing to scale it with? How about that thread that's hanging from your jacket? All you need is a Swiss Army knife, or so say its U.S distributors. These handy, all-in-one tools are selling better than ever, thanks to some clever marketing and a back-to-basics nostalgia that has helped the Swiss Army knife remain popular in the midst of a nagging recession. That's good news for Forschner Group Inc.
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NEWS
January 16, 2000 | CLARE NULLIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Switzerland is fiercely protective of its centuries-old armed neutrality, which has faced down potential foes as well as kept the Swiss out of the friendlier embrace of the United Nations and European Union. But the very symbol of that independence--the Swiss Army name--is in American hands. Under a landmark agreement with the Swiss Defense Ministry, a Connecticut-based company owns sweeping rights to market products under the "Swiss Army" name and the distinctive Swiss cross.
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BUSINESS
July 9, 1987 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
It has been the subject of cartoons and letters of appreciation and is an object of affection among explorers, mountaineers and more homebound citizens. It is the Swiss army knife, with its distinctive red handle bearing a white cross, and in the minds of many it has become the symbol of this country--rivaling banks, watches, chocolates and the national airline. Ibach, an hour's drive south of Zurich, is the headquarters of Victorinox, one of the two official makers of Swiss army knives.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1992 | From Associated Press
Got a bottle of wine but no corkscrew? Fresh bluefish, but nothing to scale it with? How about that thread that's hanging from your jacket? All you need is a Swiss Army knife, or so say its U.S distributors. These handy, all-in-one tools are selling better than ever, thanks to some clever marketing and a back-to-basics nostalgia that has helped the Swiss Army knife remain popular in the midst of a nagging recession. That's good news for Forschner Group Inc.
NEWS
January 16, 2000 | CLARE NULLIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Switzerland is fiercely protective of its centuries-old armed neutrality, which has faced down potential foes as well as kept the Swiss out of the friendlier embrace of the United Nations and European Union. But the very symbol of that independence--the Swiss Army name--is in American hands. Under a landmark agreement with the Swiss Defense Ministry, a Connecticut-based company owns sweeping rights to market products under the "Swiss Army" name and the distinctive Swiss cross.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1997 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
Newport-Mesa Unified School District trustees will consider revising their zero-tolerance weapons policy to let principals determine what punishment to give students in kindergarten through third grade. Under the policy, school principals must seek expulsion for students caught bringing any item that might be considered a weapon to school. Those cases are presented to the school board, which decides the child's punishment.
NEWS
September 8, 1999 | IRENE LACHER
Here's a literary first: Bob Zmuda's new biography, "Andy Kaufman Revealed!" (Little, Brown), manages without that prosaic feature of other books: the foreword. But it does have a backword. What's more, the backword is backward. That is, you have to hold it up to a mirror to read the letters. They spell out a secret message from actor Jim Carrey--who plays Andy Kaufman in the upcoming biopic "Man in the Moon." And it doesn't make sense until you've read the book.
NEWS
September 26, 1987 | GORDON SMITH
Rick Wall examined his Swiss army knife thoughtfully. "I've used it to cut loose threads off my slacks," he said. "I've opened wine bottles with it. Once I used a Swiss army knife to fix the phone when something got stuck inside it. "And I never go to a party without one--they're great for opening beer cans if the tab breaks off." Wall, 38, is a true fan of the Swiss army knife. He even shares the study in his Tierrasanta townhouse with the Swiss Army Knife Society. But it's no trouble--really.
NEWS
August 11, 1987 | GORDON SMITH
Rick Wall examined his Swiss army knife thoughtfully. "I've used it to cut loose threads off my slacks," he said. "I've opened wine bottles with it. Once I used a Swiss army knife to fix the phone when something got stuck inside it. "And I never go to a party without one--they're great for opening beer cans if the tab breaks off." Wall, 38, is a true fan of the Swiss army knife. He even shares the study in his Tierrasanta townhouse with the Swiss Army Knife Society. But it's no trouble--really.
NEWS
October 5, 1990 | BETH ANN KRIER and JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
DEAR HOT: I have a whole drawer full of sunglasses. One pair blocks ultraviolet light. Another blocks out blue light. I've got a pair that's shatterproof. Then I've got some that are good for nothing but style. Has anybody figured out how to put all this stuff into one pair of glasses yet? DEAR HOT SHOPPER: Swiss Army Brands Ltd.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1987 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
It has been the subject of cartoons and letters of appreciation and is an object of affection among explorers, mountaineers and more homebound citizens. It is the Swiss army knife, with its distinctive red handle bearing a white cross, and in the minds of many it has become the symbol of this country--rivaling banks, watches, chocolates and the national airline. Ibach, an hour's drive south of Zurich, is the headquarters of Victorinox, one of the two official makers of Swiss army knives.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1991 | KIM S. MARTIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The company that brought the all-purpose Swiss Army pocketknife to America is now offering products that do more than open wine bottles, strip wire or gut fish. Forschner Group Inc., the U.S. distributor of the multiblade red knives with silver crosses, has expanded into the sunglass and watch business with its new subsidiary, Swiss Army Brands Ltd. The company is banking on consumers' familiarity with the Swiss Army name to get these products off the ground.
TRAVEL
October 2, 1994 | JUDI DASH
Until recently, the only pocket tools I toted around were my two trusty Swiss Army knives--one a basic model with a couple of blades, a nail file and a corkscrew, the other a weighty multi-tool, with scissors, screw drivers and saws for both wood and metal. But newfangled twists on Swiss Army knives are popping up all over the place. Some are veritable mini-tool chests on hinges; others contain special gadgets for repairing bicycles or eyeglasses.
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