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Swiss Government

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2010 | By Richard Winton and Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
The Swiss government's decision not to extradite Roman Polanski to Los Angeles means the famed director can travel freely in France, Switzerland, Poland and other countries without extradition agreements with the United States. But some legal experts said the Swiss justice ministry's legal rationale for rejecting the extradition request could make even countries with extradition treaties think twice before arresting Polanski. The Swiss government on Monday, in explaining its decision, cited the way Polanski's case was handled in 1977 when he had sex with a 13-year-old girl.
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NEWS
May 10, 2012 | By Dan Turner
So it turns out that Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann, a former GOP presidential contender who has made a political career out of wrapping herself in the American flag and questioning the patriotism of her ideological opponents, is a dual Swiss citizen. That's pretty delicious for those who find the jingoistic isolationism of the " tea party" movement tiresome, but I take Bachmann at her word that she's an accidental Heidi. And that's a shame, because a little more exposure to places like Switzerland might broaden her worldview, if not her politics.
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NEWS
March 25, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
The Swiss government froze all assets belonging to former Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos at Swiss banks here today after attempts to withdraw money on behalf of the ousted leader. The freeze, initiated after attempts were made Monday to withdraw funds on behalf of Marcos, includes all his assets, those of his family and companies and people linked to him. Pierre Schmid, a deputy director of the Office of Federal Police, said the freeze order was without precedent.
NEWS
May 10, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmannis downplaying reports that she and her family recently became Swiss citizens, saying she has technically enjoyed dual citizenship since she married her husband in 1978. Bachmann's husband Marcus is eligible for Swiss citizenship because his parents are Swiss immigrants, but he only recently registered with the Swiss government, Politico reported earlier this week. Michele Bachmann and her three youngest children became Swiss citizens on March 19, according to the Politico report.
NEWS
September 20, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The Swiss government promised to pay more than $800,000 to two Holocaust groups, in a gesture sought by Jewish organizations after Switzerland apologized last year for turning back refugees from Nazi terror. The Cabinet decision came as pressure mounted on Swiss banks to pay back Nazi wealth and Jewish accounts left ownerless by Holocaust victims.
NEWS
December 2, 1988 | Associated Press
A kidnaped Swiss Red Cross worker today sent a letter urging Switzerland to cooperate with his captors to "save my life." The Swiss government said the kidnaping and the letter are an attempt to force the release of a Shia Muslim hijacker held in Switzerland. The government urged all Swiss people to leave Lebanon. In Bern, Foreign Ministry official Edouard Brunner said Peter Winkler's letter said his abduction was intended to pressure the Swiss government.
OPINION
August 13, 2009 | Burt Neuborne, Burt Neuborne, a professor at New York University School of Law and legal director of the Brennan Center for Justice, was the court-appointed lead counsel for Holocaust survivors in their claims against Swiss banks.
For years, Swiss bankers have marketed themselves to the world's super-rich as information black holes. Put your money in a Swiss bank account, they whisper, and you can hide it from your government's tax collectors, to say nothing about a prying spouse, or ex-spouse, or inconvenient creditors. It's a brilliant marketing tactic. Swiss banks don't necessarily get better investment returns than banks in other countries, but they do offer one huge competitive advantage: the possibility of secret manipulation of money.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Switzerland said it would seize UBS data to prevent the U.S. Justice Department from pursuing a court order seeking the identities of 52,000 American customers of the bank in a crackdown on tax evaders. The U.S. effort to enforce a summons seeking the names would force UBS to violate Swiss laws barring disclosure of such data, the Swiss government said in a motion in federal court in Miami.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1989 | From Times wire services
Former Justice Minister Elizabeth Kopp was charged today with violating official secrecy for warning her husband to quit a company subsequently linked to Switzerland's biggest drug money-laundering investigation. Kopp's personal assistant and another former Justice Department official were also charged with violating secrecy, which carries a maximum prison sentence of three years or a fine. Kopp, a Radical Democrat, in 1984 became the first woman in the Swiss government.
WORLD
January 11, 2012 | Alex Rodriguez
Ratcheting up pressure on Pakistan's embattled civilian government, the nation's Supreme Court on Tuesday threatened to dismiss Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani from office if he does not revive corruption proceedings against President Asif Ali Zardari. Gilani and Zardari, who heads the ruling Pakistan People's Party, are struggling to survive withering attacks from the country's military and judiciary, both powerful institutions that harbor long-standing animosity for the two civilian leaders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2010 | By Richard Winton and Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
The Swiss government's decision not to extradite Roman Polanski to Los Angeles means the famed director can travel freely in France, Switzerland, Poland and other countries without extradition agreements with the United States. But some legal experts said the Swiss justice ministry's legal rationale for rejecting the extradition request could make even countries with extradition treaties think twice before arresting Polanski. The Swiss government on Monday, in explaining its decision, cited the way Polanski's case was handled in 1977 when he had sex with a 13-year-old girl.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2010 | By Jack Leonard and Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
In the end, the move by Swiss authorities to free Roman Polanski did not come down to whether he drugged and raped a 13-year-old girl. Instead, the Swiss government's refusal Monday to extradite the director centered in part on a controversial 1977 backroom meeting that a Los Angeles judge held with the prosecutor and defense attorney on the case. Polanski's lawyers say the judge made it clear at the meeting that he intended to send the director to prison for a 90-day psychiatric test as his full sentence behind bars.
OPINION
August 13, 2009 | Burt Neuborne, Burt Neuborne, a professor at New York University School of Law and legal director of the Brennan Center for Justice, was the court-appointed lead counsel for Holocaust survivors in their claims against Swiss banks.
For years, Swiss bankers have marketed themselves to the world's super-rich as information black holes. Put your money in a Swiss bank account, they whisper, and you can hide it from your government's tax collectors, to say nothing about a prying spouse, or ex-spouse, or inconvenient creditors. It's a brilliant marketing tactic. Swiss banks don't necessarily get better investment returns than banks in other countries, but they do offer one huge competitive advantage: the possibility of secret manipulation of money.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2009 | David S. Hilzenrath, Hilzenrath writes for the Washington Post.
As a federal probe of secret Swiss bank accounts made headlines in the summer of 2008, New York businessman Jeffrey P. Chernick got nervous. A middleman in international toy sales, Chernick had hidden millions of dollars from the Internal Revenue Service at Switzerland's largest bank, according to a recent court filing. Concerned that the bank, UBS, would spill his secrets to the U.S.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2009 | Associated Press
The U.S. and Swiss governments and banking giant UBS indicated Sunday that they were seeking a settlement and asked a federal judge to delay high-stakes hearings on the Internal Revenue Service's effort to identify thousands of suspected U.S. tax evaders. The motion, filed in Miami less than 24 hours before the hearings were to begin today, sought postponement until Aug. 3 "to allow the two governments to continue their discussions seeking a resolution of this matter."
NEWS
June 4, 1997 | Associated Press
A search of Swiss banks turned up only $3.4 million belonging to deposed Zairian President Mobutu Sese Seko--far short of the billions he and his relatives are believed to have stashed there during his long, corrupt reign. The announcement Tuesday followed an informal survey of 12 banks in April that turned up nothing. Under pressure from the Swiss government, regulators told the banks to check again more carefully. Mobutu, ousted last month, is believed to be one of the world's richest men.
NEWS
November 19, 1996 | Associated Press
The Swiss government has refused to allow ailing Zairian President Mobutu Sese Seko to return to Switzerland for medical treatment, officials said Monday. Mobutu, who has prostate cancer, underwent surgery in Lausanne in August. He stayed in Switzerland for treatment afterward as eastern Zaire fell into civil war. Switzerland canceled Mobutu's visa when he left Nov. 4 to convalesce at his villa on the French Riviera. The Swiss turned down his request for a new visa Monday.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Switzerland said it would seize UBS data to prevent the U.S. Justice Department from pursuing a court order seeking the identities of 52,000 American customers of the bank in a crackdown on tax evaders. The U.S. effort to enforce a summons seeking the names would force UBS to violate Swiss laws barring disclosure of such data, the Swiss government said in a motion in federal court in Miami.
WORLD
July 25, 2008 | Patrick J. McDonnell and Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writers
A diplomatic dispute has broken out between Colombia and Switzerland over the role of a Swiss mediator involved in hostage-release talks with leftist rebels. Colombia cut off the longtime European mediation effort after the July 2 rescue of former presidential candidate Ingrid Betancourt and 14 other hostages, including three U.S. contractors. Colombian officials have suggested that the Swiss mediator, Jean-Pierre Gontard, exceeded his authority and became a money courier for the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC.
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