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Switzer Barry

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SPORTS
December 18, 1988 | Associated Press
The University of Oklahoma football program has been placed on three years' probation, banned from television appearances in 1989 and barred from postseason competition in 1989 and 1990 for recruiting violations, a television station reported Saturday night. KOCO-TV in Oklahoma City said that it had obtained a copy of the NCAA report to be released Monday.
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SPORTS
December 18, 1988 | Associated Press
The University of Oklahoma football program has been placed on three years' probation, banned from television appearances in 1989 and barred from postseason competition in 1989 and 1990 for recruiting violations, a television station reported Saturday night. KOCO-TV in Oklahoma City said that it had obtained a copy of the NCAA report to be released Monday.
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March 18, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
When a plane crashed into a neighborhood in South Bend, Ind., on Sunday, it took the lives of two men, one of whom was formerĀ  University of Oklahoma star quarterback Steve Davis, officials said Monday morning. Davis, 60, and Wesley Caves, 58, were both on a Hawker Beechcraft jet headed out of Tulsa, Okla., when the plane apparently suffered electrical problems. The plane, which had four passengers, briefly touched down in South Bend, took off again and then crashed into a neighborhood just southeast of South Bend Regional Airport, ultimately landing in a home, local media reported.
SPORTS
October 7, 1989 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, Times Staff Writer
It isn't a lived-happily-ever-after story yet, but it's getting there. After all, being described as "just dumb" and having "rocks for brains" in a national bestseller takes time to heal. So does dealing with the misperceptions that come with seeking psychiatric care for job-related stress. So welcome to Tony Casillas' world--at last a tiny oasis of calm rather than a raging storm.
SPORTS
September 23, 1997 | EARL GUSTKEY
The Washington Post's Michael Wilbon says tennis star Michael Chang is one of his favorite pro athletes. His explanation: "Only one element of his physical game is what you'd consider world class: his speed. That's it. "The guy is 10% talent, 90% concentration, guts, smarts, preparation, anticipation and reaction. His game is almost totally self-made, the product of tinkering and retooling and being the best-conditioned man on the tour.
SPORTS
January 27, 1996 | Bill Plaschke
As reported earlier this week, there is indeed a problem within the locker room of the Dallas Cowboys. It indeed involves a blond, blue-eyed quarterback who dislikes another segment of the room. But quarterback Troy Aikman's problem isn't with blacks. It is with Coach Barry Switzer. He doesn't like his work habits. He doesn't like his late-night habits. He thinks Switzer has lent the Cowboys his image without turning over his soul. But Aikman is in the minority.
SPORTS
November 6, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
"Mike Gundy and Hart Lee Dykes played a great game," Oklahoma Coach Barry Switzer said. "Barry Sanders played a great game." Gundy, Dykes and Sanders all play for Oklahoma State. And despite their outstanding performances, Oklahoma won--as usual. Oklahoma was in danger of having its 29-game Big Eight winning streak snapped when quarterback Charles Thompson sprinted 18 yards for a touchdown with 2:33 to play Saturday, lifting the No. 8 Sooners to a 31-28 victory over No.
SPORTS
February 8, 1996 | JIM MURRAY
In the most recent Super Bowl, they gave the game ball to the cornerback, Larry Brown, who intercepted two crucial passes. But who was the really big winner of Super Bowl XXX? I'll give you a clue: He never threw a pass, made a block, caught or ran with a ball, kicked or blocked a punt, sent in a play or fell on a fumble. Give up? Well, how about Jerral Wayne Jones? His position on the team? Owner. A non-platooned position. He was the big winner because he had the most to lose.
SPORTS
November 5, 1994 | BILL PLASCHKE
In the zebra business, Jack Fette is the equivalent of a nice warm stall. As an NFL line judge for 23 years, Fette survived playoffs, Super Bowls and even the Raiders. Now retired, he helps younger officials survive. Sitting in his office in Lees Summit, Mo., he spends hours each day on the phone with referees, line judges and back judges. He counsels them on controversial calls, warns them about tricky rules, holds their hands as they head toward another turbulent weekend.
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