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Switzerland Economy

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BUSINESS
September 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
Citizens of eight West European countries, led by Switzerland, earned more than Americans in 1988, according to figures made available by the World Bank on Friday. Switzerland's per-capita income last year was $20,130, while in the United States per capita income was $14,080. The others ahead of the United States: Luxembourg, $19,960; Sweden, $17,160; Iceland, $16,480; West Germany, $15,880; Norway, $15,250; Denmark, $14,530 and France, $14,130.
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BUSINESS
October 25, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
Gold fell on Friday to its lowest price in 12 years, in reaction to a Swiss proposal to sell almost half its gold reserves, a development that heightened expectations of a further wave of central bank gold sales that could depress prices further. Gold prices also are being hurt by the currency and stock market turmoil in Southeast Asia, which have sparked fears that Asian investors may sell some of their holdings in the precious metal.
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BUSINESS
March 8, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Swiss OK Gas Tax, Casinos: Swiss voters overturned a 73-year-old ban on casinos and approved higher gasoline taxes in referendums supporting government efforts to get the country's fiscal house in order. About 54% of the electorate voted for higher gasoline taxes in one of three referendums, a federal chancellery statement said. The Finance Ministry, grappling with a federal budget deficit of $3.2 billion this year, up from $1.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Swiss OK Gas Tax, Casinos: Swiss voters overturned a 73-year-old ban on casinos and approved higher gasoline taxes in referendums supporting government efforts to get the country's fiscal house in order. About 54% of the electorate voted for higher gasoline taxes in one of three referendums, a federal chancellery statement said. The Finance Ministry, grappling with a federal budget deficit of $3.2 billion this year, up from $1.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1990 | CLARE NULLIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Switzerland, for centuries an island of peace in a troubled Europe, is increasingly haunted by fears of isolation in an emerging super-continent. It is a wealthy country that has traditionally regarded itself as a special case, treasuring its vaunted neutrality and a stability that has helped attract capital from all over the world.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
Gold fell on Friday to its lowest price in 12 years, in reaction to a Swiss proposal to sell almost half its gold reserves, a development that heightened expectations of a further wave of central bank gold sales that could depress prices further. Gold prices also are being hurt by the currency and stock market turmoil in Southeast Asia, which have sparked fears that Asian investors may sell some of their holdings in the precious metal.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For five centuries, the craft of watchmaking was what made life tick in the valley towns and hillside hamlets in the Jura Mountains of western Switzerland. In the 100-mile arc between Geneva and the Rhine River city of Basel, watchmaking was the economic mainspring and one of life's noblest callings. The whole wide world operated on Swiss time. Then came the battery-powered quartz watch revolution.
WORLD
November 19, 2002 | From Reuters
The head of a U.N. agency aiding Palestinians said Monday that his organization is preparing a massive food program to combat growing malnutrition among residents of the West Bank and Gaza Strip. The United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East estimates that in 2003, it will need to deliver daily food parcels to 222,000 families, or about 1.3 million people, more than one-third of the Palestinian population.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Christina Rivera hates to see food go to waste, so she is cracking down at her Silver Lake restaurant. Rivera began weighing the trash generated by Gobi Mongolian BBQ House with an eye toward shrinking the pile of scraps, peels and other organic material. She put up signs noting that some 40% of the nation's food supply is thrown out each year. Then she did something that put some patrons into a rage: On busy all-you-can-eat nights, the restaurant now charges an extra fee for any plate with leftover food.
NEWS
December 7, 1987 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Panama's military strongman, Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, is shoring up his rule with menacing and arbitrary actions that are radically--perhaps permanently--changing the country's political landscape. The steady move here--from what Latin Americans call a soft dictatorship to a hard one--has driven opponents of the military underground, into exile or into sullen silence.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1990 | CLARE NULLIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Switzerland, for centuries an island of peace in a troubled Europe, is increasingly haunted by fears of isolation in an emerging super-continent. It is a wealthy country that has traditionally regarded itself as a special case, treasuring its vaunted neutrality and a stability that has helped attract capital from all over the world.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For five centuries, the craft of watchmaking was what made life tick in the valley towns and hillside hamlets in the Jura Mountains of western Switzerland. In the 100-mile arc between Geneva and the Rhine River city of Basel, watchmaking was the economic mainspring and one of life's noblest callings. The whole wide world operated on Swiss time. Then came the battery-powered quartz watch revolution.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
Citizens of eight West European countries, led by Switzerland, earned more than Americans in 1988, according to figures made available by the World Bank on Friday. Switzerland's per-capita income last year was $20,130, while in the United States per capita income was $14,080. The others ahead of the United States: Luxembourg, $19,960; Sweden, $17,160; Iceland, $16,480; West Germany, $15,880; Norway, $15,250; Denmark, $14,530 and France, $14,130.
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