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Switzerland Elections

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NEWS
December 3, 2001 | Associated Press
Swiss voters Sunday overwhelmingly rejected a proposal to scrap the armed forces, cherished by many as vital protection for the small, long-neutral Alpine country in the heart of Europe. Only 384,991 people, or 21.9% of those participating, voted in favor of the initiative. The proposal was put forward by a coalition called Switzerland Without an Army under a law that allows anyone to force a referendum by collecting 100,000 signatures from voters. "The lack of security following the Sept.
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NEWS
December 3, 2001 | Associated Press
Swiss voters Sunday overwhelmingly rejected a proposal to scrap the armed forces, cherished by many as vital protection for the small, long-neutral Alpine country in the heart of Europe. Only 384,991 people, or 21.9% of those participating, voted in favor of the initiative. The proposal was put forward by a coalition called Switzerland Without an Army under a law that allows anyone to force a referendum by collecting 100,000 signatures from voters. "The lack of security following the Sept.
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NEWS
March 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Swiss voters overwhelmingly rejected calls for immediate membership talks with the European Union, underlining the Alpine nation's tenacious independence at the heart of the continent. In a national referendum, an unexpectedly high 77% voted against the "Yes to Europe" proposal, which called for the government to begin talks on joining the trading bloc. The government campaigned against the proposal as politically premature.
NEWS
March 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Swiss voters overwhelmingly rejected calls for immediate membership talks with the European Union, underlining the Alpine nation's tenacious independence at the heart of the continent. In a national referendum, an unexpectedly high 77% voted against the "Yes to Europe" proposal, which called for the government to begin talks on joining the trading bloc. The government campaigned against the proposal as politically premature.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Swiss OK Gas Tax, Casinos: Swiss voters overturned a 73-year-old ban on casinos and approved higher gasoline taxes in referendums supporting government efforts to get the country's fiscal house in order. About 54% of the electorate voted for higher gasoline taxes in one of three referendums, a federal chancellery statement said. The Finance Ministry, grappling with a federal budget deficit of $3.2 billion this year, up from $1.
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Swiss citizens voted to keep their army as the best way of maintaining their nation's neutrality, even though the highly mobilized force has scarcely fired a shot in anger during its four centuries of existence. A proposal to abolish the army by the year 2000 was rejected by a nearly 2-to-1 margin. Although it has only about 1,800 full-time military personnel, Switzerland can mobilize 625,000 trained soldiers in 48 hours--more, it says, than West Germany.
NEWS
April 6, 1987
Swiss voters approved a government proposal for stricter laws designed to limit political asylum for refugees. In a national referendum, 67.4% of the electorate supported amendments to the asylum law that were approved by Parliament last year. A loose coalition of refugee, church and human rights groups had forced the referendum on the amendments, which they said would undermine Switzerland's long history of offering sanctuary to the persecuted.
NEWS
October 25, 1999 | Associated Press
The nationalist Swiss People's Party, which attacked its coalition partners for welcoming Kosovo refugees and edging closer to the European Union, emerged as the big winner Sunday in Swiss parliamentary elections. Initial television projections showed stunning gains for the People's Party, which was likely to remain the junior partner in Switzerland's governing coalition while winning 14 new seats in the 200-member lower house of parliament, for a total of 44.
NEWS
September 25, 2000 | From Reuters
In a nationwide referendum, Swiss voters Sunday decisively rejected a plan to reduce the number of foreigners in their country to 18% of the population. Results after nearly all the ballots were counted showed that 63.7% of voters opposed the plan. Turnout was 43.4%. A majority of voters rejected the proposal in each of the 26 Swiss cantons, or states. Foreigners make up about 19.3% of the population.
NEWS
October 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Switzerland elected a new federal Parliament in elections highlighted by strong gains for the Auto Party, a small rightist group that is urging radical curbs on the admission of foreigners. However, projections based on early returns from all 26 cantons indicated no major change in the overall political pattern of the country, which has been governed since 1959 by a conservative-liberal coalition of the four largest parties. Final returns are not expected until today.
NEWS
September 25, 2000 | From Reuters
In a nationwide referendum, Swiss voters Sunday decisively rejected a plan to reduce the number of foreigners in their country to 18% of the population. Results after nearly all the ballots were counted showed that 63.7% of voters opposed the plan. Turnout was 43.4%. A majority of voters rejected the proposal in each of the 26 Swiss cantons, or states. Foreigners make up about 19.3% of the population.
NEWS
October 25, 1999 | Associated Press
The nationalist Swiss People's Party, which attacked its coalition partners for welcoming Kosovo refugees and edging closer to the European Union, emerged as the big winner Sunday in Swiss parliamentary elections. Initial television projections showed stunning gains for the People's Party, which was likely to remain the junior partner in Switzerland's governing coalition while winning 14 new seats in the 200-member lower house of parliament, for a total of 44.
NEWS
November 30, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Swiss on Sunday voted overwhelmingly against legalizing heroin and other narcotics, apparently heeding government warnings that the proposed law would turn their pristine Alpine nation into a drug haven. With all ballots counted, 74% voted against a constitutional amendment that would make legal "the consumption, cultivation or possession of drugs, and their acquisition for personal use." In favor were 26%, or 454,404 people.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Swiss OK Gas Tax, Casinos: Swiss voters overturned a 73-year-old ban on casinos and approved higher gasoline taxes in referendums supporting government efforts to get the country's fiscal house in order. About 54% of the electorate voted for higher gasoline taxes in one of three referendums, a federal chancellery statement said. The Finance Ministry, grappling with a federal budget deficit of $3.2 billion this year, up from $1.
NEWS
December 8, 1992 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are no borders separating the villages of Sierre and Salgesch in western Switzerland, only a few acres of grapevines and a burbling mountain stream called La Raspille. But after Sunday's national referendum, called to decide Switzerland's role in Europe, the cultural wall separating the two Rhone River valley towns, one French-speaking and the other German-speaking, had never seemed so formidable.
NEWS
December 7, 1992 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voters dealt a sharp setback to Switzerland's political and business Establishment Sunday by rejecting a national referendum to join a 19-nation European Economic Area, a move that would have required this Alpine country to abandon some of its traditional isolation and neutrality on global issues.
NEWS
October 19, 1987 | United Press International
Swiss voters elected a new national Parliament for four years Sunday with preliminary results showing the environmentalist Greens party making slight gains at the expense of parties on the far right, but the basic political scene remains the same. The 200-seat Lower House and the 46-seat Upper House remained firmly controlled by the conservative Free Democrats, Christian Democrats and People's Party, with the Social Democrats forming the main opposition.
NEWS
December 7, 1992 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voters dealt a sharp setback to Switzerland's political and business Establishment Sunday by rejecting a national referendum to join a 19-nation European Economic Area, a move that would have required this Alpine country to abandon some of its traditional isolation and neutrality on global issues.
NEWS
December 1, 1992
Swiss voters decide on Sunday whether they want to break with a policy of neutrality dating from the Congress of Vienna in 1815 and join the 19-nation European Economic Area, a new trade organization seen as a first step for joining the European Community as a full-fledged member. Such a move could eventually force the mountain confederation of 26 semiautonomous cantons to give up its status as a tax haven.
NEWS
October 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Switzerland elected a new federal Parliament in elections highlighted by strong gains for the Auto Party, a small rightist group that is urging radical curbs on the admission of foreigners. However, projections based on early returns from all 26 cantons indicated no major change in the overall political pattern of the country, which has been governed since 1959 by a conservative-liberal coalition of the four largest parties. Final returns are not expected until today.
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