Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSwitzerland Government
IN THE NEWS

Switzerland Government

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Switzerland on Tuesday said a U.S. historian's report accusing it of having discriminated against wartime Jewish refugees by locking them up in labor camps and subjecting them to a special tax was insulting, simplistic and laced with errors. "Any former refugees who were in Swiss camps today express gratitude toward Switzerland for the fact that they survived the war because they were accepted in Switzerland," said Linda Shepard, an official spokeswoman in Bern, the Swiss capital.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 22, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marc Rich is everywhere and nowhere in this world-class tax haven. As is customary in democratic Switzerland, the fugitive financier whom President Clinton pardoned on his way out of office is listed in the telephone directory--phone number, address and all. But he doesn't answer calls or come to the door of his lakeside villa in the nearby hamlet of Meggen.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Georges-Andre Chevallaz, then a young lieutenant carrying a rifle, remembers when the Swiss army pulled back into the snowy Alps, expecting at any moment a blitzkrieg by the Nazis and their allies. "After the defeat of France, Switzerland was completely encircled. It decided to defend itself in its mountain redoubt, but it also had to survive," said Chevallaz, now 82, who went on to become president of his country.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2000 | Associated Press
Swiss officials postponed indefinitely the auction of four licenses to operate new-generation mobile telephone services after the number of bidders dropped to four, wrecking hopes of a multibillion-dollar windfall. The government, which had hoped to make up to $5.6 billion, is now facing the prospect of receiving only about $112 million.
NEWS
October 26, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Switzerland said it will consider ethics as well as the letter of the law in deciding what to do with any unclaimed wealth of Holocaust victims that it finds and for which no heirs have emerged. "We won't be protecting ourselves only behind legal parameters," Foreign Ministry spokesman Jean-Philippe Tissieres said. "There is the law, and there is ethics. We will make a due mixture of the two things."
NEWS
September 20, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The Swiss government promised to pay more than $800,000 to two Holocaust groups in a gesture sought by Jewish organizations after Switzerland apologized last year for turning back refugees from Nazi terror. A government spokesman said the payment was not linked to a controversy over allegations that Switzerland had been safekeeping Nazi gold since World War II.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1990 | CLARE NULLIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Switzerland, for centuries an island of peace in a troubled Europe, is increasingly haunted by fears of isolation in an emerging super-continent. It is a wealthy country that has traditionally regarded itself as a special case, treasuring its vaunted neutrality and a stability that has helped attract capital from all over the world.
NEWS
December 15, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A U.S. delegation was in Europe asking foreign governments to unfreeze Gen. Manuel A. Noriega's bank accounts to finance the former Panamanian leader's legal defense. Assistant U.S. Atty. Michael Sullivan told a federal judge in Miami that the group consists of State and Justice department officials visiting Austria and Switzerland. Swiss officials expect to hold talks with the delegation next week, a spokesman said.
NEWS
November 4, 1987 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
The Swiss government Tuesday turned over crucial bank records to U.S. investigators in the Iran-Contra case, making it likely that independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh will seek a sweeping indictment alleging that conspirators illegally diverted funds from arms sales to Iran and tried to obstruct justice. Review of the thousands of pages of documents will require several weeks and perhaps delay any charges until next year, sources familiar with the case said.
NEWS
January 24, 1997 | The Washington Post
The Swiss government Thursday endorsed a proposal to set up a Holocaust memorial fund as quickly as possible to compensate survivors of Nazi death camps and heirs of those who died there. The decision represented a dramatic reversal by the government less than a month after the country's outgoing president, Jean-Pascal Delamuraz--in a remark he has since apologized for--said that creating such a fund before all historical evidence is examined would be tantamount to "extortion" and "blackmail."
NEWS
December 11, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
An international panel of historians declared that Switzerland was guilty of acting as an accomplice in the Holocaust when it refused to accept many thousands of fleeing Jews and instead sent them back to almost certain annihilation at the hands of the Nazis.
NEWS
June 15, 1998 | Reuters
The Los Angeles-based Simon Wiesenthal Center defended its latest Holocaust report Sunday after a backlash by the Swiss government and even by the famed Nazi-hunter for whom the center is named. "We are not backing down. This is not a report about the Swiss people of 1942 or the Swiss government or people of today," Rabbi Marvin Hier, dean of the Wiesenthal Center, said Sunday. Hier said historian Alan Morris Schom's report was a survey of extremist groups.
NEWS
June 14, 1998 | From Associated Press
A Jewish newspaper in Switzerland has disputed a new report that alleges some Swiss leaders were pro-Nazi during World War II, charging that the study distorted the strength of a movement supporting the Third Reich. The newspaper, the Israelitisches Wochenblatt, alleged that the study issued in New York by the Simon Wiesenthal Center "deliberately suppressed the strong anti-Nazi movement in Switzerland."
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | From Reuters
Authors of a controversial report accusing the Swiss government of aiding Nazi Germany during World War II defended themselves Wednesday against accusations that the conclusions were unproved. The report, based largely on documents from German and Swiss archives, was criticized by Swiss President Flavio Cotti as "untenable and perfidious" and an insult to "an entire generation."
NEWS
June 10, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Switzerland's justice minister met clandestinely during World War II with leaders of a Swiss anti-Semitic group, promising to stop most Jews fleeing the Holocaust from entering the country but warning that the policy had to be kept secret, according to documents contained in a report to be released today.
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Switzerland on Tuesday said a U.S. historian's report accusing it of having discriminated against wartime Jewish refugees by locking them up in labor camps and subjecting them to a special tax was insulting, simplistic and laced with errors. "Any former refugees who were in Swiss camps today express gratitude toward Switzerland for the fact that they survived the war because they were accepted in Switzerland," said Linda Shepard, an official spokeswoman in Bern, the Swiss capital.
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | From Reuters
Authors of a controversial report accusing the Swiss government of aiding Nazi Germany during World War II defended themselves Wednesday against accusations that the conclusions were unproved. The report, based largely on documents from German and Swiss archives, was criticized by Swiss President Flavio Cotti as "untenable and perfidious" and an insult to "an entire generation."
BUSINESS
November 14, 2000 | Associated Press
Swiss officials postponed indefinitely the auction of four licenses to operate new-generation mobile telephone services after the number of bidders dropped to four, wrecking hopes of a multibillion-dollar windfall. The government, which had hoped to make up to $5.6 billion, is now facing the prospect of receiving only about $112 million.
NEWS
May 8, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A comprehensive U.S. government study of the gold plundered by the Nazis during World War II--part of it from Holocaust victims--harshly criticizes Switzerland for accepting the bounty, and it faults the United States and its allies for failing to press for a proper redistribution of the loot. The stolen gold--most of which came from the official reserves of occupied nations--was sold by the Nazis to finance their war machine.
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Georges-Andre Chevallaz, then a young lieutenant carrying a rifle, remembers when the Swiss army pulled back into the snowy Alps, expecting at any moment a blitzkrieg by the Nazis and their allies. "After the defeat of France, Switzerland was completely encircled. It decided to defend itself in its mountain redoubt, but it also had to survive," said Chevallaz, now 82, who went on to become president of his country.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|