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Switzerland Labor

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NEWS
December 2, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has been more than two years since 36-year-old Ferdi Rutenfrans lost his last paying job, cataloguing books at the Amsterdam public library. "I wasn't exactly fired," he said. But he didn't exactly quit either. He chafed under what he calls the library's "hierarchical" organization. "I had words with my employer," and the next thing he knew he had joined the sizable ranks of the Dutch unemployed.
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NEWS
December 2, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has been more than two years since 36-year-old Ferdi Rutenfrans lost his last paying job, cataloguing books at the Amsterdam public library. "I wasn't exactly fired," he said. But he didn't exactly quit either. He chafed under what he calls the library's "hierarchical" organization. "I had words with my employer," and the next thing he knew he had joined the sizable ranks of the Dutch unemployed.
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NEWS
February 14, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For five centuries, the craft of watchmaking was what made life tick in the valley towns and hillside hamlets in the Jura Mountains of western Switzerland. In the 100-mile arc between Geneva and the Rhine River city of Basel, watchmaking was the economic mainspring and one of life's noblest callings. The whole wide world operated on Swiss time. Then came the battery-powered quartz watch revolution.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For five centuries, the craft of watchmaking was what made life tick in the valley towns and hillside hamlets in the Jura Mountains of western Switzerland. In the 100-mile arc between Geneva and the Rhine River city of Basel, watchmaking was the economic mainspring and one of life's noblest callings. The whole wide world operated on Swiss time. Then came the battery-powered quartz watch revolution.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1992 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The aftershocks from General Motors Corp.'s unprecedented management shake-up continued Tuesday as the world's largest auto maker named a new chief for its highly successful European subsidiary, which has become a model for its ailing U.S. operations. GM said Louis R. Hughes will fill the hole left by Robert Eaton's defection to Chrysler Corp. last month. In addition, Robert W.
WORLD
April 26, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI, India -- The death toll in Bangladesh rose to more than 300 people Friday following the collapse this week of a building that housed five apparel factories, officials said, as protests by workers at other garment plants intensified. Bangladesh police fired tear gas and rubber bullets as hundreds of stick-wielding workers in the Dhaka area stopped highway traffic, smashed vehicles and vandalized garment factories that refused to close during a declared day of mourning.
WORLD
April 25, 2013 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - A clothing factory in an emerging country collapses or catches fire with horrific loss of life. Famous Western brands are found in the wreckage. An investigation reveals substandard practices in the local and global clothing trade. There was a distinct feeling of deja vu Thursday as rescuers worked desperately through the night at the site of a collapsed building in Bangladesh, crafting makeshift escape chutes from bolts of fabric. The hand-wringing, finger-pointing and promises of reform started hours after the nine-story Rana Plaza building pancaked Wednesday morning just outside the nation's capital, Dhaka, killing at least 238 people, most of them apparel workers, and injuring more than 1,000.
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