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Sybil

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NEWS
February 14, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
Maybe Sybil just needed a good night's sleep. Multiple personality disorder is a rare and extreme form of what psychiatrists call "dissociative disorder," and it was popularized by the publication in the early 1970s of the novel "Sybil. " Psychiatrists have long thought that dissociative disorder might be a person's natural response to extreme trauma, such as child sexual abuse, during which a victim might psychologically protect him or herself by "going away. " A patient experiencing dissociation might describe feeling outside or separate from himself or from reality.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By David Ng
Sybil Christopher, who died last week in New York at 83, was a noted theater producer and the founder of Arthur, a Manhattan hot spot that attracted a ritzy celebrity clientele during the 1960s. Even if she hadn't become famous as the first wife, and later, ex-wife, of actor Richard Burton, Christopher would still have occupied an important seat in New York high society and culture. "She was very hands on -- as hands on a mother as she was a producer. " said Kate Burton, her eldest daughter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
What? Me crying?! No, I was just, uh… slicing some onions while watching “Downton Abbey.” You know how it is on Sunday night, the weekend is over and you just want to mindlessly chop vegetables watching your favorite British period piece. What? Doesn't everyone do that? OK, fine. So maybe I was crying. Can you really blame me? “Downton Abbey” is a show that triggers a wide range of emotions in its audience - frustration, fascination, amusement, titillation, boredom.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Between Beyonce's show-stopping halftime performance at Super Bowl XLVII and “Downton Abbey,” Sunday night was all about the ladies - single or otherwise. As I noted last week, the female characters have taken center stage this season on “Downton Abbey” in a way that's somewhat surprising, with scorned bride Edith now a budding feminist, Isobel an unapologetic advocate for “fallen women,” and Daisy poised to become a trailblazing lady farmer. At the same time, two of the most prominent men of the manor, Carson and Lord Grantham, are turning into living anachronisms before our very eyes.
NATIONAL
May 11, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The Navy's newest guided missile destroyer was christened after a pilot who spent 7 1/2 years in captivity in North Vietnam, received the Medal of Honor and served as presidential candidate H. Ross Perot's running mate. Four Medal of Honor recipients and seven former prisoners of war attended the ceremony at Bath Iron Works that marked a milestone in construction of the 9,200-ton ship named for Vice Adm. James Stockdale. His widow, Sybil, christened the ship.
BOOKS
April 16, 1989 | ELENA BRUNET
"Grazia: How can you be a Dowell and be so free of despair?," Steve writes to his first cousin and fiance Grace Dowell, the novel's narrator. "An optimistic Dowell . . . is not natural." The Dowell clan is indisputably an eccentric lot. Grace's great-aunt Sybil may be certifiably mad, and Grace's older cousin Steve--handsome, possibly brilliant, and definitely impenetrable--is pretentious and unpleasant. Grace, a bright, well-adjusted 19-year-old, has been in love with Steve since age 3. Now her aunt Sybil and a fortuneteller named Fleesha the Futurist are warning her to break loose from a "Disastrous Attachment."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1987 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
"Don't quibble, Sybil!" is one of the late and much-lamented Charles Ludlam's funniest stolen lines. It is delivered in the course of his outlandish "Bluebeard"--early Ludlam that's something of a cross between "Little Shop of Horrors" and "Young Frankenstein." That, at least is what it was meant to be. With Ludlam's wickedly jerry-rigged pieces, most of them written for himself to star in at his Ridiculous Theatre in New York, a flair for the ridiculous was a given.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1986 | DONALD CHASE, Chase is a New York writer specializing in film
"Why won't you let me do this? I must try, I must try!" "Why do you want to do this? You've graduated from college--the first person in the family--you should go get a solid job!" This dialogue between a daughter bent on an acting career and a father horrified at the prospect is quoted from memory by Kate Burton.
NEWS
November 23, 1987 | CAROLYN SEE
Stories From the Warm Zone and Sydney Stories by Jessica Anderson (Viking: $15.95; 246 pages) If you are interested--really interested--in how families work, these are perfect stories for you.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1986 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD
It's taken more punches than Rocky, more flak than Rambo. It's been parodied endlessly on "Saturday Night Live" and accommodated comics in need of one-liners. It's a guilty pleasure within the show-biz community--no one except publicists ever admits to watching it (like nobody ever voted for Nixon, right?). But it's a bona-fide hit everywhere else. "Entertainment Tonight," America's No.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
He was a former advertising executive who became one of television's top producers, bringing powerhouse shows such as "Dallas," "Knots Landing" and "The Waltons" into American homes in the 1970s and '80s. Lee Rich, co-founder and former president of Lorimar Productions, died Thursday of lung cancer at his home in Los Angeles, a Warner Bros. spokesman confirmed. He was 93. "Lee Rich was a giant in the television industry who produced some of the most iconic series in the history of the medium and influenced audiences worldwide," CBS Chief Executive Leslie Moonves said in a statement.
NEWS
February 14, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
Maybe Sybil just needed a good night's sleep. Multiple personality disorder is a rare and extreme form of what psychiatrists call "dissociative disorder," and it was popularized by the publication in the early 1970s of the novel "Sybil. " Psychiatrists have long thought that dissociative disorder might be a person's natural response to extreme trauma, such as child sexual abuse, during which a victim might psychologically protect him or herself by "going away. " A patient experiencing dissociation might describe feeling outside or separate from himself or from reality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2011
Sybil Jason, 83, a former child actress signed by the Warner Brothers Studio to rival Twentieth Century Fox star Shirley Temple, died Aug. 23 at her home in Northridge, her family announced. She had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Born in Cape Town, South Africa, on Nov. 23, 1927, Jason began singing and dancing as a toddler. Her uncle Harry Jacobson, a pianist who accompanied stage performers in London, found her parts in British vaudeville productions, where she was discovered by studio head Jack Warner.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2008 | Mary McNamara, Times Television Critic
For anyone older than 40, the story of “Sybil,” as told in the book by Flora Rheta Schreiber(book) and the Emmy-winning television movie that starred Sally Field and Joanne Woodward, is one of those semi-traumatizing pop-cultural touchstones -- like "Helter Skelter" or Watergate. The horrific tale of a young woman so abused by her mother that her mind shatters into 16 separate personalities rocked 1970s America.
NATIONAL
May 11, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The Navy's newest guided missile destroyer was christened after a pilot who spent 7 1/2 years in captivity in North Vietnam, received the Medal of Honor and served as presidential candidate H. Ross Perot's running mate. Four Medal of Honor recipients and seven former prisoners of war attended the ceremony at Bath Iron Works that marked a milestone in construction of the 9,200-ton ship named for Vice Adm. James Stockdale. His widow, Sybil, christened the ship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2007 | Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writer
For months, Los Angeles County jail officials have been waiting to reopen a long-shuttered women's facility to help ease some of the overcrowding that plagues the rest of the massive and violence-prone system. But 14 months after the Board of Supervisors voted to spend more than $100 million to refurbish the Sybil Brand Institute, an antiquated structure on a hilltop near East Los Angeles, not a bit of work has been accomplished.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1986 | Pat H. Broeske and FO
"Whether we're traditional heroes or New Wave sheroes, favorite action movie characters are basic 'no-frills' models: No past, no future, no emotions, no dialogue . . . and no sex." So says action-adventure queen Sybil Danning, who--like the action kings featured in last Sunday's Calendar cover piece ("Real Men Don't Need Kisses")--frequently goes romance-less in her movies. The reason, according to Danning's rep: Audiences prefer to see her in action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2006 | Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writer
Responding to a variety of pressures, Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca will propose today that the county spend more than $300 million to add thousands of beds to improve conditions in its aging and overcrowded jail system.
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