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Sydney Andrews

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2009 | By Denise Martin
The most disarming thing about Laura Leighton and Thomas Calabro -- "Melrose Place's" diabolical Sydney Andrews and Michael Mancini -- is that they appear not to have aged since Aaron Spelling's campy hit wrapped in 1999. Calabro dismissed the idea with a laugh. "You're not the first person to say that, but it's not true," Leighton said. Oh, but it is, as evidenced in Tuesday's episode, which flashed back to Sydney's first death 12 years ago, a fatal car accident she somehow survived.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2009 | Maria Elena Fernandez
That shaking underneath Hollywood tonight is not from a quake, but from the force unleashed by the return of a TV powerhouse no less than William Shatner reprising his role as Capt. James T. Kirk or Larry Hagman taking over "Dallas" again. Amanda Woodward -- that is, Heather Locklear -- is back on "Melrose Place," and her arrival couldn't be better timed. The first time Amanda appeared at the West Hollywood apartment complex of twentysomething troublemakers and bed-hoppers, Aaron Spelling's show wasn't living up to its "Beverly Hills, 90210" spinoff hype.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2009 | Maria Elena Fernandez
Todd Slavkin and Darren Swimmer are the kinds of writers who bring back popular people from the dead only to kill them. In 1997, "Melrose Place" viewers were devastated when a car struck and killed Sydney Andrews (Laura Leighton) on her wedding day. But in the pilot of Slavkin's and Swimmer's remake, Sydney is alive and looking sensational in her middle age -- until she's discovered floating in the apartment complex pool about 10 minutes into the show. That the executive producers have chosen to kick off the new series with the resurrection and swift death of a fan favorite is a fitting tribute to the '90s version and the classic episode in which the villainous Kimberly Shaw (Marcia Cross)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2009 | Denise Martin
The most disarming thing about Laura Leighton and Thomas Calabro -- "Melrose Place's" diabolical Sydney Andrews and Michael Mancini -- is that they appear not to have aged since Aaron Spelling's campy hit wrapped in 1999. Calabro dismissed the idea with a laugh. "You're not the first person to say that, but it's not true," Leighton said. Oh, but it is, as evidenced in Tuesday's episode, which flashed back to Sydney's first death 12 years ago, a fatal car accident she somehow survived.
SPORTS
August 17, 1995 | MIKE BRESNAHAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trisha Lane jumped off a dock milliseconds before 20 pounds of TNT exploded behind her. No problem. Lane, a stuntwoman, also drove the car that ran over the evil heartthrob character of Michael Mancini in the 1994 season finale of "Melrose Place." No sweat. No sweaty palms, either. There's really only one way to increase Lane's pulse: let her ride the angriest bronco available. "Stunt work will give you an adrenaline rush," Lane said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2009 | Maria Elena Fernandez and Denise Martin
CW President Dawn Ostroff feels no shame in her network being a little sexist. After all, the CW's focus on 18-to-34-year-old women paid off last season with the growth of "Gossip Girl," the resurgence of "One Tree Hill," and the success of the freshman "90210." "There's nothing wrong with us specifically going after young women," Ostroff said Tuesday at the Television Critics Assn.'s press tour in Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2009 | Maria Elena Fernandez
That shaking underneath Hollywood tonight is not from a quake, but from the force unleashed by the return of a TV powerhouse no less than William Shatner reprising his role as Capt. James T. Kirk or Larry Hagman taking over "Dallas" again. Amanda Woodward -- that is, Heather Locklear -- is back on "Melrose Place," and her arrival couldn't be better timed. The first time Amanda appeared at the West Hollywood apartment complex of twentysomething troublemakers and bed-hoppers, Aaron Spelling's show wasn't living up to its "Beverly Hills, 90210" spinoff hype.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1993 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
One Big Happy Family: "The Late Show With David Letterman" is signing up CBS affiliates--97% have agreed to air the program, with 67% committing to show it at the network-recommended time of 11:35 p.m. (10:35 p.m. Central Time), according to David Poltrack, CBS' senior vice president of planning and research. By comparison, NBC's "The Tonight Show With Jay Leno" is shown at its recommended time by nearly 100% of that network's affiliates. Letterman's new show premieres Aug. 30.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2009 | Maria Elena Fernandez
Todd Slavkin and Darren Swimmer are the kinds of writers who bring back popular people from the dead only to kill them. In 1997, "Melrose Place" viewers were devastated when a car struck and killed Sydney Andrews (Laura Leighton) on her wedding day. But in the pilot of Slavkin's and Swimmer's remake, Sydney is alive and looking sensational in her middle age -- until she's discovered floating in the apartment complex pool about 10 minutes into the show. That the executive producers have chosen to kick off the new series with the resurrection and swift death of a fan favorite is a fitting tribute to the '90s version and the classic episode in which the villainous Kimberly Shaw (Marcia Cross)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2009 | Maria Elena Fernandez and Denise Martin
CW President Dawn Ostroff feels no shame in her network being a little sexist. After all, the CW's focus on 18-to-34-year-old women paid off last season with the growth of "Gossip Girl," the resurgence of "One Tree Hill," and the success of the freshman "90210." "There's nothing wrong with us specifically going after young women," Ostroff said Tuesday at the Television Critics Assn.'s press tour in Pasadena.
SPORTS
August 17, 1995 | MIKE BRESNAHAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trisha Lane jumped off a dock milliseconds before 20 pounds of TNT exploded behind her. No problem. Lane, a stuntwoman, also drove the car that ran over the evil heartthrob character of Michael Mancini in the 1994 season finale of "Melrose Place." No sweat. No sweaty palms, either. There's really only one way to increase Lane's pulse: let her ride the angriest bronco available. "Stunt work will give you an adrenaline rush," Lane said.
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