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SPORTS
September 24, 1993 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The prevailing view of the International Olympic Committee is that its members are royalty, or at least fabulously rich. In fact, some of them are, some are not. But even those who are not are treated as if they were when on official business for the IOC.
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SPORTS
June 24, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atlanta, 1995. The Olympic Games are a year away. But Michael Knight already can see that these Games will be remembered for how not to get things done. An example: Tickets to modern pentathlon are cheap. That makes pentathlon, with five events spread across a number of venues, a hot ticket to the Olympic experience. Knight recalls being told a year in advance by a senior Atlanta organizer, "Michael, we'll be doing well to get the athletes to the five events.
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SPORTS
February 28, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If he could write a perfect script now, with 200 days to go until the opening of the Sydney Olympics, Michael Knight, the Australian government minister in charge of putting on the Games, says it would go like this: No rain. The athletes "have a ball." The Australian team wins 60 medals--up from 41 four years ago. And: "I didn't have to give a press conference about a problem during the whole period of the Games." Knight paused.
SPORTS
June 2, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what could turn out to be a defining moment of sports serving diplomacy, the International Olympic Committee has invited the two Koreas to march together behind the Olympic flag in the opening ceremony at September's Sydney Games. Typically reclusive North Korea has not issued a response to the notion, suggested in a May 25 letter from IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch to both countries.
NEWS
September 24, 1993 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Residents of Beijing--where government officials had hoped the glory of hosting the Olympic Games would erase the stigma of the 1989 crackdown at Tian An Men Square--reacted first with joy when they thought they had won the competition for the 2000 Games, then with stoic dejection and tears when they learned they had lost it to Sydney, Australia.
SPORTS
February 28, 2000 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
In exactly 200 days, this city will be ready to rumble. On Friday night, Sept. 15, it will throw one of those coming-out parties we have come to expect and cherish every four years, celebrating the athletes of the world. It will be Summer Olympics time, when, traditionally, we: * Care about sports we don't care about. Little girls are given gold medals for dancing with ribbons and we weep. Horses prance, are rewarded for precision hoofing and we applaud.
SPORTS
June 2, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what could turn out to be a defining moment of sports serving diplomacy, the International Olympic Committee has invited the two Koreas to march together behind the Olympic flag in the opening ceremony at September's Sydney Games. Typically reclusive North Korea has not issued a response to the notion, suggested in a May 25 letter from IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch to both countries.
SPORTS
June 24, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atlanta, 1995. The Olympic Games are a year away. But Michael Knight already can see that these Games will be remembered for how not to get things done. An example: Tickets to modern pentathlon are cheap. That makes pentathlon, with five events spread across a number of venues, a hot ticket to the Olympic experience. Knight recalls being told a year in advance by a senior Atlanta organizer, "Michael, we'll be doing well to get the athletes to the five events.
NEWS
May 25, 1999 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The middle-aged Parisian lawyer made his way through the celebration and shook the hand of Sydney Olympic bid leader Rod McGeoch. "I don't know how you did that," he said. It was Sept. 23, 1993, the day Sydney won the right to host the 2000 Summer Olympics. The lawyer, Samuel Pisar--legal counsel to International Olympic Committee President Juan Antonio Samaranch--was not the only one puzzled by Sydney's surprise selection.
SPORTS
February 28, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If he could write a perfect script now, with 200 days to go until the opening of the Sydney Olympics, Michael Knight, the Australian government minister in charge of putting on the Games, says it would go like this: No rain. The athletes "have a ball." The Australian team wins 60 medals--up from 41 four years ago. And: "I didn't have to give a press conference about a problem during the whole period of the Games." Knight paused.
SPORTS
February 28, 2000 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
In exactly 200 days, this city will be ready to rumble. On Friday night, Sept. 15, it will throw one of those coming-out parties we have come to expect and cherish every four years, celebrating the athletes of the world. It will be Summer Olympics time, when, traditionally, we: * Care about sports we don't care about. Little girls are given gold medals for dancing with ribbons and we weep. Horses prance, are rewarded for precision hoofing and we applaud.
NEWS
May 25, 1999 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The middle-aged Parisian lawyer made his way through the celebration and shook the hand of Sydney Olympic bid leader Rod McGeoch. "I don't know how you did that," he said. It was Sept. 23, 1993, the day Sydney won the right to host the 2000 Summer Olympics. The lawyer, Samuel Pisar--legal counsel to International Olympic Committee President Juan Antonio Samaranch--was not the only one puzzled by Sydney's surprise selection.
SPORTS
September 24, 1993 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The prevailing view of the International Olympic Committee is that its members are royalty, or at least fabulously rich. In fact, some of them are, some are not. But even those who are not are treated as if they were when on official business for the IOC.
NEWS
September 24, 1993 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Residents of Beijing--where government officials had hoped the glory of hosting the Olympic Games would erase the stigma of the 1989 crackdown at Tian An Men Square--reacted first with joy when they thought they had won the competition for the 2000 Games, then with stoic dejection and tears when they learned they had lost it to Sydney, Australia.
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