Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSydney Brenner
IN THE NEWS

Sydney Brenner

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1991 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two scientists from Cambridge University have joined the new department of cell biology at the Research Institute of Scripps Clinic, to pursue studies of the role of the single cell as a root of illness and disease. Sydney Brenner, now director of the molecular genetics unit at Cambridge's Medical Research Council in England, is renowned for his pioneering work on the structure and function of genes as the cellular material responsible for the transmission of inherited information.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
SCIENCE
October 8, 2002 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A La Jolla scientist and two colleagues from MIT and Cambridge University who used the simple roundworm to unravel the complex processes controlling the birth and death of cells in humans on Monday received the 2002 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine.
SCIENCE
October 8, 2002 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most scientists are fortunate to be involved in one major discovery during their lifetime. Sydney Brenner, who received the 2002 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine, has been involved in at least three. One, for which he received this year's prize, was the idea to use the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as an experimental subject to study the birth and death of cells in living organisms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2003 | Stuart Silverstein and Beth Silver, Special to The Times
As chancellor at UC San Diego, physicist Robert C. Dynes laid down a challenge to students each year. He invited them to a 5K race on campus and pledged to donate $25 to an undergraduate scholarship fund for each student who beat him. Despite being an accomplished runner at age 60, Dynes has had to pay out some significant sums. But there aren't many who could rival the pace of his career in the UC system. Dynes joined UC San Diego as a physics professor in 1991.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
Most scientists are fortunate if they can make one major discovery in their lifetime. Dr. Paul Zamecnik made two, each of which should have won him a Nobel Prize. Working with Dr. Mahlon Hoagland, he discovered transfer RNA, a crucial molecule in the synthesis of proteins in the cell. Later, he invented the idea of antisense therapy, in which strands of DNA or RNA are used to block the activity of genes -- a concept that is now being turned into a new class of drugs for cancer, HIV and a host of other diseases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
Dr. Mahlon Hoagland, who helped unravel the mystery of how cells build proteins by discovering a molecule that brings individual amino acids to growing protein chains and who spent the latter part of his career explaining biology to the public in a series of well- received books, died Sept. 18 at his home in Thetford, Vt. He was 87. He had been suffering from cardiovascular disease and kidney failure and chose to abstain from food and drink to die peacefully, lingering for nine days with his family at hand.
SCIENCE
September 30, 2010 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
The drama that surrounded Francis Crick and James Watson's 1953 unveiling of the structure of DNA is no secret ? Watson described the heated competition between two British research groups in his bestselling book, "The Double Helix. " But part of the record had been thought lost when Crick's papers were apparently thrown out by what he described as "an over-efficient secretary. " That nameless secretary has now been exonerated. Researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York recently uncovered the long-lost letters mixed up with the papers of Sydney Brenner, Crick's officemate of more than two decades.
BOOKS
July 9, 2006 | Sara Lippincott, Sara Lippincott is an assistant editor of Book Review.
MATT RIDLEY'S "Francis Crick: Discoverer of the Genetic Code" is the latest volume in Atlas Books' "Eminent Lives" series, whose previous books have celebrated, among others, Caravaggio, Beethoven, Thomas Jefferson and George Balanchine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1992 | RICK WEISS, Weiss, a science writer living in New York, is a former writer for Science News magazine
Dan Lindsley pauses for a moment when asked to give the names of his favorite mutants. Well, he says, there is Drop Dead. And Coitus Interruptus. And Male Chauvinist Pigmentation. But there are so many to choose from. About 4,000, to be exact, and Lindsley knows them all.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|