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October 16, 1989 | ATHY CURTIS
A fellow wearing a towel walks into the bathroom, sits down on the toilet and poses like Rodin's "The Thinker." That sophomoric piece of business comes from "Some Rooms," an evening-long exercise in vulgarity and vacuous athleticism performed by the Sydney Dance Company Friday night at Royce Hall on the UCLA campus. According to the press materials, company artistic director Graeme Murphy's 1983 piece reflects "different aspects of the human outlook."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1999 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Buff Aussies may be universally acknowledged as archetypes of pulchritude, but ceding the UCLA dance series to them could be considered overkill.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1999 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Buff Aussies may be universally acknowledged as archetypes of pulchritude, but ceding the UCLA dance series to them could be considered overkill.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1999 | RITA FELCIANO, Rita Felciano is a Bay Area dance writer
When the Sydney Dance Company toured the U.S. in 1997 with its percussive "Free Radicals," it had been close to 10 years since Australia's best-known modern-dance company had been seen in this country. Now, a mere 15 months later, the company is back for the hit's second tour; it will play in Los Angeles on Friday and Saturday at Royce Hall. Unlike many percussion-dance collaborations on the international circuit these days, "Free Radicals" is devoid of ear-splitting assaults.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1988 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
Graeme Murphy is the Tasmanian devil of the dance world, the outrageous ballet choreographer whose pop routines defrosted ice-dancing champions Torvill and Dean on their first professional tour, who sent Cupid zooming on a skateboard in "Daphnis and Chloe" and who got a naked Tadzio all steamed up in "After Venice." Most of all, Murphy has made the Sydney Dance Company a hot ticket from New York to New Zealand.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1999 | RITA FELCIANO, Rita Felciano is a Bay Area dance writer
When the Sydney Dance Company toured the U.S. in 1997 with its percussive "Free Radicals," it had been close to 10 years since Australia's best-known modern-dance company had been seen in this country. Now, a mere 15 months later, the company is back for the hit's second tour; it will play in Los Angeles on Friday and Saturday at Royce Hall. Unlike many percussion-dance collaborations on the international circuit these days, "Free Radicals" is devoid of ear-splitting assaults.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1999
Movies Dustin Hoffman recently received the AFI Life Achievement Award and here's an opportunity to see his early standout performances in "The Graduate" (1967) and "Midnight Cowboy" (1969). New Beverly Cinema, 7165 Beverly Blvd., (323) 938-4038. (Through Saturday.) * Jazz Alto saxophonist Greg Osby and vibraphonist Stefon Harris, left, are joined by pianist Jason Moran and tenor Mark Shim in a band of young all-stars from the Blue Note label. The Mint, 6010 W. Pico Blvd., L.A., (323) 954-8241.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1999
* TV Museum. The Museum of Television & Radio begins its 16th annual William S. Paley Television Festival Tuesday. On opening night the museum will screen the U.S. premiere of "This Is Sinatra!," a 1962 concert taped at London's Royal Festival Hall for British TV. Other highlights include a salute to Carl Reiner (March 9), and episodes of "The Twilight Zone" (March 4), "The Ben Stiller Show" (March 8), "thirtysomething" (March 11) and "L.A. Law" (March 13). Each event includes guest appearances.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Educational activities have long been in a state of cautious growth at the Los Angeles Philharmonic. With the announcement that the W.M. Keck Foundation has awarded a new grant of $1.2 million to the orchestra's education department, that growth gets a boost.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2012 | By Susan Josephs, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Gideon Obarzanek can trace much of his artistic drive to a creative restlessness that stems, he says, "from an interest beyond pure dance. " "How can dance coordinate with other forms?" he asks. "This has been a creative engine for me, in that I've been able to make unique works. But it's also a frustration. Because a part of me always wants to go off and do other things and then I keep getting pulled back into a dance context. " Since founding the Australian dance company Chunky Move in 1995, Obarzanek has consistently pushed the boundaries of how contemporary dance can be viewed and understood through mining his omnivorous interests in theater, film, visual art, science and technology.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1989 | ATHY CURTIS
A fellow wearing a towel walks into the bathroom, sits down on the toilet and poses like Rodin's "The Thinker." That sophomoric piece of business comes from "Some Rooms," an evening-long exercise in vulgarity and vacuous athleticism performed by the Sydney Dance Company Friday night at Royce Hall on the UCLA campus. According to the press materials, company artistic director Graeme Murphy's 1983 piece reflects "different aspects of the human outlook."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1988 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
Graeme Murphy is the Tasmanian devil of the dance world, the outrageous ballet choreographer whose pop routines defrosted ice-dancing champions Torvill and Dean on their first professional tour, who sent Cupid zooming on a skateboard in "Daphnis and Chloe" and who got a naked Tadzio all steamed up in "After Venice." Most of all, Murphy has made the Sydney Dance Company a hot ticket from New York to New Zealand.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1989 | LEWIS SEGAL
Twyla Tharp disbanded her company. Mark Morris moved to Brussels. The Joffrey Ballet traded away its fall repertory season in Los Angeles. But 1988 was still a year of hope and achievement in dance--especially, for once, on the local scene. This was the year the Los Angeles City Council at last recognized that support from the private sector just wasn't enough. On Nov. 22, it approved the L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1998 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't ask Batsheva Dance Company director Ohad Naharin to scour his memory about his early days with the company he took over almost a decade ago. "I have the memory of a dead cat," Naharin said, speaking from Seattle, where the company was dancing ahead of its date tonight at the Irvine Barclay Theatre. "It might be good exercise to reconstruct the history of the time since I came to Batsheva. But it's an ongoing process. I've learned a lot about my own work since then."
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