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Sydney Omarr

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2003 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
Sydney Omarr, the astrologer and counselor to the rich and famous whose horoscopes are the most widely read in the world, died Thursday. He was 76. Blinded and paralyzed from the neck down by multiple sclerosis, Omarr died at St. John's Health Center in Santa Monica of complications from a heart attack. His ex-wife, assistants and several close friends were by his side.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 11, 2003
Probably in hindsight we could have foreseen sad feelings over the recent predictable passing of Sydney Omarr, the longtime Times astrologer. Like astrology, he was intriguing, a Philadelphia native offering predictably vague insights into the future with hope and good nature. A Leo, Omarr's forecast for himself the day he died of multiple sclerosis was: "You will beat the odds."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2002 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
It's an early Thursday afternoon and the world's most widely read astrologer is busy divining the future. Lying in bed with his head propped up on pillows, Sydney Omarr, blinded and paralyzed from the neck down by multiple sclerosis, waits for a cue from his editorial advisor, Capricorn Valerie Barbeaux. Seated before an old IBM Selectric II typewriter prepped with a blank sheet and carbon paper, Barbeaux says, "Syd, this is for Friday, Dec. 6 ... moon in Capricorn. Aries."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2003 | J. Michael Kennedy, Times Staff Writer
The scramble is on in the world of astrological forecasting. And the reason is the death of horoscope icon Sydney Omarr last week. Omarr, whose life was marked by advice from the stars and to the stars, was one of the most famous people to inhabit the horoscope world. His life included fancy dinner parties, whiskey, gambling and a tie to the days past when astrological forecasts still were evolving into standard fare for newspapers.
OPINION
January 11, 2003
Probably in hindsight we could have foreseen sad feelings over the recent predictable passing of Sydney Omarr, the longtime Times astrologer. Like astrology, he was intriguing, a Philadelphia native offering predictably vague insights into the future with hope and good nature. A Leo, Omarr's forecast for himself the day he died of multiple sclerosis was: "You will beat the odds."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2003 | J. Michael Kennedy, Times Staff Writer
The scramble is on in the world of astrological forecasting. And the reason is the death of horoscope icon Sydney Omarr last week. Omarr, whose life was marked by advice from the stars and to the stars, was one of the most famous people to inhabit the horoscope world. His life included fancy dinner parties, whiskey, gambling and a tie to the days past when astrological forecasts still were evolving into standard fare for newspapers.
NEWS
February 4, 1992
Sydney Omarr-The Astrological Forecast column for Monday was inadvertently published Saturday in the Calendar section.
SPORTS
July 18, 1994 | STEVE HORN
Sydney Omarr writes a daily astrological column, and he knew what was in the stars. Here was part of his forecast for Italy's Roberto Baggio, which ran in Sunday's Times' World Cup special report: "He'll be somewhat locked up. He'll have a tendency to choke."
TRAVEL
March 12, 1989
The spring issue of Traveling In Style magazine (appearing in next Sunday's Los Angeles Times) will feature authors ranging from Mary Higgins Clark ("Weep No More My Lady") to David Westheimer ("Von Ryon's Express"). Clark takes us on a visit to Cape Cod, while Westheimer reports on a buying binge in Europe. In the same issue, astrologer Sydney Omarr discusses month-by-month travel opportunities, and Jimmy Breslin runs off helter-skelter to Central America with an expired passport.
TRAVEL
March 19, 1989 | BETTY HUGHES
Don't miss the spring issue of the Traveling in Style magazine in this week's Los Angeles Times. Keeping readers on the edge of their seats, journalist Jimmy Breslin recalls a spur-of-the-moment trip to Central America with an expired passport. Best-selling mystery author Mary Higgins Clark shares the joys of her hideaway in Cape Cod.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2003 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
Sydney Omarr, the astrologer and counselor to the rich and famous whose horoscopes are the most widely read in the world, died Thursday. He was 76. Blinded and paralyzed from the neck down by multiple sclerosis, Omarr died at St. John's Health Center in Santa Monica of complications from a heart attack. His ex-wife, assistants and several close friends were by his side.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2002 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
It's an early Thursday afternoon and the world's most widely read astrologer is busy divining the future. Lying in bed with his head propped up on pillows, Sydney Omarr, blinded and paralyzed from the neck down by multiple sclerosis, waits for a cue from his editorial advisor, Capricorn Valerie Barbeaux. Seated before an old IBM Selectric II typewriter prepped with a blank sheet and carbon paper, Barbeaux says, "Syd, this is for Friday, Dec. 6 ... moon in Capricorn. Aries."
NEWS
January 25, 1993 | ROY RIVENBURG
Socks: White House cat. Most photographed feline since Morris. Terrified of the President, according to astrologer Sydney Omarr. Bill Clinton: Certified fan of both Fleetwood and Big Macs. Fifth southpaw to become President. Ex-brunet. Has never "inhaled." Hillary Rodham Clinton: Chocolate-chip cookie whiz. Another ex-brunette. Big on children's rights--unless it's Chelsea's right to have pierced ears. Chelsea Clinton: Named for song "Chelsea Morning." Ballet lover.
NEWS
February 5, 1995 | BRIAN BALLOU, NEWSDAY
Those who fashion their lives by their horoscopes may be a little miffed by this one: All those signs are a month off, a British astronomer contends. And all you Sagittarians, well, you're actually Ophiuchians, and were born under the sign of the god of healing, the lost 13th constellation, says Jacqueline Mitton of the Royal Astronomical Society. "The zodiac is constantly changing," she said.
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