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Sydney Pollack

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Friends, family and show business colleagues gathered to remember the late Oscar-winning director, producer and actor Sydney Pollack at a private memorial service in Los Angeles on Saturday. The 73-year-old director, producer and actor died of cancer May 26. Pollack won Academy Awards for best picture and best director for his 1985 epic "Out of Africa." He directed more than 20 films, including "Tootsie," "Absence of Malice" and "The Way We Were." He also produced 2007's "Michael Clayton," nominated for seven Oscars (supporting actress Tilda Swinton was the lone winner)
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NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Susan King
Laemmle's Royal Theatre in West Los Angeles is presenting a six-day retrospective of actor-director-producer Robert Redford's seminal film roles. All movies will be shown along with his latest film, the critically lauded  "All Is Lost," for which Redford received New York Film Critics Award for best actor and earned Golden Globe and Critics Choice Award nominations. Screening Thursday evening is 1969's "Downhill Racer," directed by Michael Ritchie, in which Redford plays a cocky downhill skier who joins the U.S. ski team in Europe.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Movie Critic
With the death of Sydney Pollack at age 73, we mourn not just the end of a man but, unexpectedly, the last days of an era as well. I say unexpectedly because those kinds of melancholy end-of-days comments are usually reserved for the passing of towering figures of cinema such as Ingmar Bergman or Michelangelo Antonioni. As Pollack himself, a smart and gregarious man, remarkably sane given his long exposure to Hollywood, would have been the first to admit, he was not that kind of filmmaker.
HOME & GARDEN
August 10, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
The longtime family home of film director and producer Sydney Pollack and his wife, Claire, has sold in Pacific Palisades less than two months after it was listed at $7.85 million. The sales price was not divulged and is not yet available in the public record. Built in 1940 and '41 and designed by Wallace Neff, the 5,200-square-foot main house retains such signature Neff details as tall chimneys, thick walls, an oval dining room and French doors in many rooms leading to gardens.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1992 | BARBARA SALTZMAN
One way to destroy the pleasure of seeing a good film is to dissect the life out of it. But watching well-done laser disc releases of films with intelligent explanatory tracks and supplementary materials can help you understand the complexities of filmmaking, and make you marvel at how the good ones came together at all. A new letterboxed Criterion release of the 1982 comedy "Tootsie" ($80, CLV, CAV, digital audio sound) comes close to providing that experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1993 | ELAINE DUTKA
Sydney Pollack, whose latest film "The Firm" has taken in more than $85 million in less than three weeks of release, is mulling a suitable follow-up. Press reports had the director committed to the Warner Bros. film version of the bestseller "The Bridges of Madison County" by Robert James Waller. Pollack calls such talk premature. "I am seriously considering the project," the director says. "I did agree to try to get a screenplay together in the hope we could make it this fall.
OPINION
September 30, 1990 | Nina J. Easton, Nina J. Easton covers the film industry for The Times. She interviewed Sydney Pollack in the director's office at Universal Studios
In Hollywood, where the creative and business communities are often at odds, director and producer Sydney Pollack is that rare filmmaker who is a respected player on both sides. So the addition of his name to a recent petition urging the Motion Picture Assn. of America to revamp its movie-ratings system carried enormous weight. After months of discussions, the MPAA last week did away with its X rating and substituted a new category, NC-17 (no children under 17 allowed).
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
When a book sells 7 million copies and is translated into 29 languages, who can doubt that it is doing something right? So the inevitable film adaptation has to decide whether to play it perfectly safe or take risks with what is close to a sure thing. The powers behind "The Firm" (citywide) have avoided the dilemma by splitting the difference. They have carefully protected the core qualities of the John Grisham novel while radically rejiggering its plot line.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1990 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When "Casablanca" was remade for television a number of years back, with David Soul in the Bogart role, everybody scoffed. Now we have a new remake, and it's called "Havana." The filmmakers aren't calling it a remake, of course and, strictly speaking, they're right. Still, what's the dividing line between affectionate tribute and rip-off? "Havana," scripted by Judith Rascoe and David Rayfiel, doesn't even proffer an "inspired by" credit. Set in Havana on the eve of the Castro revolution, this Sydney Pollack production stars Robert Redford as Jack Weil, a wayward, high-stakes American poker player who falls hard for the Swedish wife (the Swedish Lena Olin)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1993 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, Lawrence Christon is a Times staff writer
John Grisham's novel "The Firm," besides being a page-turner, is a parable of greed in the money-loving '80s. To bite the golden apple, it reminds us, is to invite poison. But what happens when it's the only thing that shows up on the menu? Sydney Pollack directed the film version, which opens Wednesday. For all the doubt and ambiguity and even mortal disconnect that often show up in the characters of Pollack's films (usually men, such as "Jeremiah Johnson" or the Denys Finch Hatton character in "Out of Africa")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
David Rayfiel, a screenwriter and master script doctor who made his mark — often uncredited — on films by director Sydney Pollack that frequently featured Robert Redford, including "Three Days of the Condor," "The Way We Were" and "Out of Africa," has died. He was 87. Rayfiel died Wednesday at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City of congestive heart failure, said his daughter, Eliza Roberts. The rich collaboration between Pollack and Rayfiel began in the early 1960s, endured for more than 40 years and encompassed at least 15 films.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2009 | Dawn C. Chmielewski
Dick Berg, a longtime television and motion picture writer and producer, died Tuesday from a fall at his home in Los Angeles. He was 87. A pioneer of the made-for-television movie format that revolutionized network programming in the 1970s, Berg helped launch a generation of young directors, including Sydney Pollack, Mark Rydell, Robert Ellis Miller and Stuart Rosenberg. He was also the patriarch of a family prominent in Hollywood, with three sons who followed him into the entertainment industry and a fourth who became a famous biographer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2009 | Greg Braxton
The last time HBO built a series around primarily female characters, the show was "Sex and the City" and it revolved around four white women exploring the mysteries of love in the wilds of New York City. Now the premium cable network is launching another female-centric show, "The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency," and it's about two black women investigating the mysteries within the wilds of Africa.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2009 | Lee Margulies
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has ruled that all four producers of "The Reader" will be recognized in the film's best picture nomination, even though academy rules usually cap the number at three. The rules allow an exception for "rare and extraordinary" circumstances, however, and they were judged to apply in this case, the academy said, since the film's original producers, Anthony Minghella and Sydney Pollack, died before the movie was completed. So Minghella and Pollack will be recognized along with producers Donna Gigliotti and Redmond Morris.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Friends, family and show business colleagues gathered to remember the late Oscar-winning director, producer and actor Sydney Pollack at a private memorial service in Los Angeles on Saturday. The 73-year-old director, producer and actor died of cancer May 26. Pollack won Academy Awards for best picture and best director for his 1985 epic "Out of Africa." He directed more than 20 films, including "Tootsie," "Absence of Malice" and "The Way We Were." He also produced 2007's "Michael Clayton," nominated for seven Oscars (supporting actress Tilda Swinton was the lone winner)
OPINION
May 31, 2008
Re "Oscar-winning filmmaker was meticulous with his craft," May 27 I was shocked and saddened to learn of the death of Sydney Pollack. Even though he will be remembered as a director, he was dripping in that singular quality every actor in this town would kill to have: immediate credibility. As one who toils too many hours on movie sets, and who can spot a director who doesn't know what he's doing, watching a Pollack film is to witness commercial artistic craftsmanship in a league of its own. He never forgot that Hollywood is show business.
NEWS
May 27, 1993 | KATY NOVIELLO
"Bobby Deerfield" (1977), directed by Sydney Pollack. 124 minutes. Rated PG. Al Pacino is a shallow race car driver who eventually comes to make choices based more on his own personal values rather than on society's expectations or preconceptions. Although the film does have a few problems, it is also filled with memorable scenes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1997
Academy Award-winning producer-director Sydney Pollack will be the featured guest at a "Close Up" seminar at 5 p.m. on June 29 at Paramount Studios' Main Theatre, 5555 Melrose Ave., Los Angeles. Actor Martin Landau will moderate the event, which is presented by Actors Studio West. The evening will include a discussion of Pollack's work, film clips and a question-and-answer period. Tickets are $50 and $80. Information: (213) 660-TKTS.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Movie Critic
With the death of Sydney Pollack at age 73, we mourn not just the end of a man but, unexpectedly, the last days of an era as well. I say unexpectedly because those kinds of melancholy end-of-days comments are usually reserved for the passing of towering figures of cinema such as Ingmar Bergman or Michelangelo Antonioni. As Pollack himself, a smart and gregarious man, remarkably sane given his long exposure to Hollywood, would have been the first to admit, he was not that kind of filmmaker.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Sydney Pollack, who died Monday of pancreatic cancer, was not an auteur director. He was, however, a brilliant storyteller, comfortable working in every genre: dramas, comedies, political thrillers, even westerns. A former acting teacher, his major strength as a director was his extraordinary ability to bring out perfectly nuanced performances. His collaboration with Robert Redford led to some of Pollack's best films, including 1985's "Out of Africa," which won him the best director Oscar.
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