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September 26, 1985 | from the Washington Post
Sydney Schanberg has resigned from the New York Times after the newspaper refused to restore his column and he rejected an offer of a position on the New York Times Magazine. Schanberg, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of Cambodia and became a celebrity when his story was made into the movie "The Killing Fields," saw his column on New York killed on Aug. 19.
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September 3, 1989 | SHELLEY LIST, The author is a journalist, novelist, television writer/producer and a member of the board of Operation California, a medical relief group. She was supervising producer on "Cagney and Lacey" and most recently co-created with partner Jonathan Estrin the pilot "Sisters" for CBS. and
On Aug. 3, I arrived in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, as a member of a delegation that showed "The Killing Fields" to the very people whose suffering is depicted in the 1984 film. Among those invited were Roland Joffe, the director of the film, and Sydney Schanberg, the former New York Times journalist who was the protagonist of the story. Joffe had never been here, having shot the film in Thailand, and Schanberg was returning for the first time since he was evacuated in 1975.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1989 | SHELLEY LIST, The author is a journalist, novelist, television writer/producer and a member of the board of Operation California, a medical relief group. She was supervising producer on "Cagney and Lacey" and most recently co-created with partner Jonathan Estrin the pilot "Sisters" for CBS. and
On Aug. 3, I arrived in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, as a member of a delegation that showed "The Killing Fields" to the very people whose suffering is depicted in the 1984 film. Among those invited were Roland Joffe, the director of the film, and Sydney Schanberg, the former New York Times journalist who was the protagonist of the story. Joffe had never been here, having shot the film in Thailand, and Schanberg was returning for the first time since he was evacuated in 1975.
NEWS
September 26, 1985 | from the Washington Post
Sydney Schanberg has resigned from the New York Times after the newspaper refused to restore his column and he rejected an offer of a position on the New York Times Magazine. Schanberg, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of Cambodia and became a celebrity when his story was made into the movie "The Killing Fields," saw his column on New York killed on Aug. 19.
NEWS
August 21, 1985 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
New York Times writer Sydney Schanberg, whose experiences as a war correspondent in Cambodia earned him the Pulitzer Prize and formed the basis of the recent film "The Killing Fields," was dismissed this week from his duties as author of the paper's twice-weekly "New York" column, the Times announced Tuesday. "Sydney Schanberg has been asked to accept another assignment, which is now under discussion," the paper said in a two-paragraph story at the bottom of Page 18 of Tuesday's editions.
NEWS
August 2, 1989 | From Times wire service s
"The Killing Fields," the movie that showed the brutality of Khmer Rouge rule in the 1970s in Cambodia, will be shown in a Cambodian theater Friday for the first time, the director said today. Among those attending the screening will be Sydney Schanberg, the American journalist depicted in the 1984 Academy Award-winning film, who will make his first visit to Cambodia since he left there 14 years ago.
NEWS
February 13, 1986 | Associated Press
Dith Pran, whose ordeal in the Khmer Rouge work camps of Cambodia inspired the film "The Killing Fields," was sworn in today as a U.S. citizen, a move he says will help his mission of bringing peace to his native land. "I'm glad I made it. My dream came true," he said to the judges, immigration officials, news media and 336 other new citizens gathered in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn. Dith then said a phrase in his native Khmer, which he translated as "Long live freedom."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1992
I appreciated Sydney Schanberg's article (Commentary, Nov. 11) regarding the POW-MIA cover-up. It sickens me each time I read about the official Senate investigations and negotiations with Hanoi, which all seem to have a predetermined conclusion. Since they couldn't keep the cat in the bag about knowingly leaving American POWs behind in Southeast Asia, Korea and Europe, they now seek to convince or reassure the American people that there are none alive today. I am not reassured. Like many, I could not believe the horror of soldiers living as POWs for all these years until I began reading about the efforts of Col. Bo Gritz, under U.S. government sponsorship, to try and bring out living American POWs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1985 | NICK B. WILLIAMS JR., Times Staff Writer
"The Killing Fields," the Academy Award-nominated film account of Khmer Rouge terror in Cambodia and of the relationship between an American journalist and his Cambodian aide, opened this week in Bangkok. Just beyond 100 miles from the Cambodian border, where Khmer Rouge and non-Communist guerrillas are fighting a Vietnamese army, a crowd of modishly dressed Thais filed into the Villa Theater, chattering in anticipation.
NEWS
February 14, 1986 | JENNINGS PARROTT
--Dith Pran, whose ordeal in the Khmer Rouge work camps of Cambodia inspired the Academy Award-winning film "The Killing Fields," was sworn in as a U.S. citizen, a move he says will help his mission of bringing peace to his native land. "I'm glad I made it. My dream came true," he said to the judges, immigration officials, news media and 336 other new citizens gathered in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn. "I'm very grateful to the people of United States of America," Dith said.
NEWS
May 25, 1988 | Reuters
Vietnam, which invaded Cambodia 10 years ago, said today that it will withdraw 50,000 troops by the end of this year and place the rest under the Cambodian high command, Western diplomats said. The pullout will be the second major withdrawal by Communist forces from another nation this year and will create a more favorable atmosphere for Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev in his Moscow summit with President Reagan beginning Sunday.
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