Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSylmar Ca Development And Redevelopment
IN THE NEWS

Sylmar Ca Development And Redevelopment

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 14, 2001 | DIANE WEDNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The growing national trend of linking commercial and residential projects to transportation hubs will get a boost today when a San Fernando Valley developer and his partners put several new homes in their Sylmar "transit village" on the market. Tarzana-based developer Montage Development Inc.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 14, 2001 | DIANE WEDNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The growing national trend of linking commercial and residential projects to transportation hubs will get a boost today when a San Fernando Valley developer and his partners put several new homes in their Sylmar "transit village" on the market. Tarzana-based developer Montage Development Inc.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1994 | VIVIEN LOU CHEN
A Bel-Air developer is one step closer to getting two housing projects off the ground in Sylmar, after months of contention with residents who want to maintain the rustic flavor of their neighborhoods. The Los Angeles Planning Commission recently approved requests by Mark Armbruster to change the zoning for Dronfield Avenue from Bledsoe to Tyler streets, and Foothill Boulevard east of Glenoaks Boulevard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took him more than a year of wrangling with city officials, but Alfred Mann, one of the wealthiest businessmen in the San Fernando Valley, finally got the green light Wednesday to buy a hunk of land in Sylmar for a new biomedical plant. Councilman Alex Padilla had blocked the project for months, insisting that Mann meet several conditions--including setting up an internship program for Mission College students--before the lawmaker agreed to support it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1998 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine living in a development that is within walking distance of a mass transit center, where you can drop off your child at a built-in day-care center before catching a comfortable commuter train to work. Now imagine this development in Southern California, where car is king and freeways are the king's crowded domain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1995
The Los Angeles City Council gave a preliminary go-ahead for the use of special financing to help a private developer build a business park, residential development and 18-hole golf course in Sylmar. The council voted Tuesday to allow the developer of the so-called Silver Oaks project near the intersection of the Golden State and Foothill freeways to conduct studies needed to set up a special assessment district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1994 | GEOFFREY MOHAN
Residents angered over two proposals to convert equestrian land to housing complexes have reached tentative accords with a Bel-Air developer. The developer, Mark Armbruster, would be able to construct 67 attached homes on Foothill Boulevard near Glenoaks Boulevard, and 33 single-family homes on Dronfield Avenue if the agreements hold, according to both sides. Equestrians had vehemently opposed both developments in earlier forms, but after a series of meetings both sides have given ground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1992 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawmakers on Wednesday voted to spend $1.9 million to buy a six-acre parcel in Sylmar for development of a train station for the downtown Los Angeles-to-Santa Clarita Metrolink rail line. The Metrolink line is scheduled to open in October, and city officials are racing to acquire the Sylmar property and build a covered platform and adjacent 500-space parking lot for commuters to meet that deadline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1993 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After sometimes heated testimony, the Los Angeles City Council delayed until today a decision on whether to locate the future Police Academy at a former electronics firm in Westchester instead of at a planned site in Sylmar. While those backing purchase of the 13.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1993 | GEOFFREY MOHAN
Community activists and a Bel-Air developer are scheduled to meet tonight to try to settle differences over a proposed 84-unit development at the edge of an equestrian-zoned residential neighborhood. The meeting comes at the request of the city Planning Commission, which has delayed its decision on the rezoning request until Dec. 9.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2001 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just down the slope from my year-old gated community, a developer has broken ground for another housing tract. Heavy equipment rumbles across dirt roads. Construction crews pound nails into two-by-fours. County and city workers keep a watchful eye on the site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the promise of hundreds of jobs for Sylmar, Los Angeles City Councilman Alex Padilla blocked a land deal involving biotech mogul Alfred Mann on Friday, saying a manufacturing plant being considered for the site is different from what the community was promised. Amid questions about impact on the environment and employment, Padilla diverted Mann's proposed purchase of surplus city land for further study after learning that Mann had apparently changed his initial plans for the site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after the Los Angeles City Council took the first step to create a redevelopment area encompassing 6,835 acres of the northeast San Fernando Valley, the proposal has bogged down, sharply dividing a citizens panel. The plan for the city's largest redevelopment area is more than a year behind schedule, and the group of local residents and merchants the council formed to offer advice appears deadlocked over whether the plan should go forward.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1999 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Making good on an earlier promise to involve community groups in campus expansion plans, Mission College officials welcomed area residents and activists to a brainstorming session Friday aimed at crafting a five-year development plan for the community college. The session was held in part to make amends for last year's forfeiture of $4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1998 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine living in a development that is within walking distance of a mass transit center, where you can drop off your child at a built-in day-care center before catching a comfortable commuter train to work. Now imagine this development in Southern California, where car is king and freeways are the king's crowded domain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1995 | KAY HWANGBO
A proposed business park and 18-hole golf course in Sylmar cleared its final hurdle Wednesday after a city planning official signed off on recent changes to the project. After the meeting, Darryl Fisher, who is the one-man Deputy Advisory Agency, said he approved the updated project because the one significant change--adding the golf course--would be good for the community. The advisory agency is charged with reviewing subdivision proposals in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1991 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Police Department, looking for a site for a new police academy and high-speed driving school, is concentrating its search on the rugged landscape of Sylmar, which has much of the city's rare, remaining open space. Three of four proposed sites for the 50-acre police driving school are in Sylmar, where police officials will hold their first meeting tonight to hear public comments on the proposals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1991 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assemblyman Richard Katz and other local leaders vowed Saturday during a rally in Sylmar to preserve scenic Wilson Canyon as open space and to stop the building of 250 luxury homes in the woodland retreat. "We will fight to preserve Wilson Canyon," Katz (D-Sylmar) told more than 500 people who gathered in an Olive View Medical Center parking lot below the canyon. "We will do whatever we can, for as long as it takes. And in the end, Wilson Canyon will be saved."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1995 | DOUGLAS ALGER
Two of four Valley homes custom-made for people with cerebral palsy and other developmental disabilities were opened in Sylmar on Thursday. The $2-million project was paid for by grants from the city of Los Angeles and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, as well as private donations. The homes have been in the planning stages for five years and are designed to provide their residents greater independence.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|