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Sylmar Ca Landmarks

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1993 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was not the Louisiana Purchase, but the 3.8-acre cemetery that Will G. Noble bought in 1925 north of the San Fernando Mission was a pretty good bargain for $10. Being the only mortician in the northern San Fernando Valley at the time, it made good business sense for Noble to buy the dusty little cemetery--a lowly plot of dirt inhabited by the earthly remains of those early Valley settlers and Native Americans who lacked the money or Catholic upbringing to be buried at the mission cemetery.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1994 | GEOFFREY MOHAN
The wooden bin of peanuts is right where it always was in Cooper's Hardware Store, beside the sign asking patrons to please throw the shells on the floor. The peanuts were there at 7 a.m. last Monday too--a sign that even after the earthquake, some institutions remained. Customers who streamed into the darkened store on Foothill Boulevard in search of emergency supplies nibbled them as they shopped, tossed the shells, then paid what they could. Many just promised to pay some time later.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1994 | GEOFFREY MOHAN
The wooden bin of peanuts is right where it always was in Cooper's Hardware Store, beside the sign asking patrons to please throw the shells on the floor. The peanuts were there at 7 a.m. last Monday too--a sign that even after the earthquake, some institutions remained. Customers who streamed into the darkened store on Foothill Boulevard in search of emergency supplies nibbled them as they shopped, tossed the shells, then paid what they could. Many just promised to pay some time later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1993 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was not the Louisiana Purchase, but the 3.8-acre cemetery that Will G. Noble bought in 1925 north of the San Fernando Mission was a pretty good bargain for $10. Being the only mortician in the northern San Fernando Valley at the time, it made good business sense for Noble to buy the dusty little cemetery--a lowly plot of dirt inhabited by the earthly remains of those early Valley settlers and Native Americans who lacked the money or Catholic upbringing to be buried at the mission cemetery.
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