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Sylvia Bursztyn

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1998
Barry Tunick and Sylvia Bursztyn, please note that an "ohm" measures resistance and a "mho" measures impedance (Puzzler, Jan. 25). The two are not the same but are reciprocals of each other. This can cause a bit of consternation when trying to fit "mho" where you had intended "ohm"! KATE REEVES Fullerton
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2011 | Claire Noland, Los Angeles Times
Sylvia Bursztyn, who parlayed her playful spirit and love of language into a 30-year career of creating devilishly clever Sunday crossword puzzles for the Los Angeles Times, has died. She was 62. Bursztyn was found dead at her Granada Hills home on Dec. 30. The Los Angeles County coroner ruled her death was from natural causes. Bursztyn collaborated with her puzzle partner Barry Tunick on The Times' word game from April 1980 until his death in 2007, then continued on her own. Their Puzzler first appeared in the Book Review, then moved to the Sunday magazine and finally landed in Sunday Calendar.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2000
I love your crosswords and never miss one, but alas, poor Tunick (Puzzler, by Sylvia Bursztyn and Barry Tunick, Jan. 2)! 'Twas not Hamlet who said "All the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players. . . ." It was said by Jaques in Act II, Scene VIII of "As You Like It." KEITH MILLS Claremont
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2009
Where is the Sunday crossword by Sylvia Bursztyn? Please tell me that you haven't eliminated her puzzles, which I have been following for over 20 years. Her puzzles, and those with the late Barry Tunick, are unique and the highlight of the Sunday L.A. Times for me. It was bad enough when you eliminated the stand-alone book section, but please don't touch Bursztyn's puzzles. Carol Perry Redondo Beach Editors' note: Bursztyn is taking some time off, and Merl Reagle is filling in.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1997
One of my prayers is "Lord, if I must die, let it be after I complete my first cup of coffee and the Sunday Puzzler"--especially when it's as much fun as the one last Sunday. My humble thanks to Barry Tunick and Sylvia Bursztyn for making my Sunday mornings a special time of joy. ARLINE M. ELLIOTT Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2001
Puzzle makers Sylvia Bursztyn and Barry Tunick are usually quite knowledgeable in their science-related clues, but in their March 18 crossword they had a little math confusion. The common clue for 35 and 77 across was "geometry abbr." The answers were COS (for cosine) and COSEC (for cosecant). However, these two terms are used in trigonometry, not geometry. JOHN LANE Stanton
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1996
Sylvia Bursztyn and I appreciate Kate Reeves' distinction between opalescence and chatoyancy in regard to our cluing "cat's-eye" as "opalescent gem" in our Dec. 8 Puzzler (Letters, Dec. 15). But not being mineralogists, we relied on the Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (10th edition) definition of "cat's-eye": "Any of various gems (as a chrysoberyl or a chalcedony) exhibiting opalescent reflections from within." BARRY TUNICK Culver City
MAGAZINE
September 9, 1990
The Puzzler has changed. I'm not sure when it started--it's been some time--but thetraditional tools of solution, such as etymology, history, literature and overall erudition have been supplanted. Now one needs nothing less than to be attuned to the subjective cuteness of Sylvia Bursztyn and Barry Tunick. The Puzzler used to provide a goodly dose of personal satisfaction upon its completion; a certain smugness. Now, alas, I feel diminished by it. Rather than a battle of wits, it has become an exercise in deciphering the lame puns of its creators.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2009
Where is the Sunday crossword by Sylvia Bursztyn? Please tell me that you haven't eliminated her puzzles, which I have been following for over 20 years. Her puzzles, and those with the late Barry Tunick, are unique and the highlight of the Sunday L.A. Times for me. It was bad enough when you eliminated the stand-alone book section, but please don't touch Bursztyn's puzzles. Carol Perry Redondo Beach Editors' note: Bursztyn is taking some time off, and Merl Reagle is filling in.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1995
I've been a fan of Puzzler for years, but I must admit that I'm getting tired of seeing certain words appear in the weekly crossword over and over. Therefore, I'd like to issue a challenge to Puzzler creators Barry Tunick and Sylvia Bursztyn: Please give us a year's worth of Puzzlers without SPA, EEL, EBB, ASP, OOP, ABET, ABUT, ARIA, DIVA, EMIT, STY, ARLO and ALOE. Especially ALOE! NICK DeBENEDETTO Encino Looks like you didn't need to call (900) 454-3303 for help with the answers to 19 across last week or 3 down across the way.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2001
Puzzle makers Sylvia Bursztyn and Barry Tunick are usually quite knowledgeable in their science-related clues, but in their March 18 crossword they had a little math confusion. The common clue for 35 and 77 across was "geometry abbr." The answers were COS (for cosine) and COSEC (for cosecant). However, these two terms are used in trigonometry, not geometry. JOHN LANE Stanton
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2000
Whenever anyone writes with comments or questions about the Puzzler, they always begin by praising the authors, Barry Tunick and Sylvia Bursztyn. Well, I'm not going to be any different. The Puzzler is great! It's the primary reason why I subscribe to The Times. Now, concerning the Nov. 12 Puzzler: The answer to 4 down, "OPEC opener," turns out to be "oil." Doesn't OPEC stand for Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries? And if so, shouldn't the correct answer be "org"? Or is this just Barry and Sylvia's way of making the puzzle a little more challenging?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2000
I love your crosswords and never miss one, but alas, poor Tunick (Puzzler, by Sylvia Bursztyn and Barry Tunick, Jan. 2)! 'Twas not Hamlet who said "All the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players. . . ." It was said by Jaques in Act II, Scene VIII of "As You Like It." KEITH MILLS Claremont
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1999
Wow! A thousand consecutive L.A. Times Sunday crossword puzzles ("A Grand Occasion," May 30). If my math is accurate, that means that the collaboration of Barry Tunick and Sylvia Bursztyn has gone on for about 20 years. What a remarkable achievement! And how do we learn about it? They tell us by working it into the Puzzler, of course. May the collaboration go on for at least another 20 years. JOHN SCHULTE Banning Tunick and Bursztyn deserve the congratulations and praise of cruciverbalists everywhere, and I sincerely hope they get them.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1998
Before you print a "correction" to one of your crossword puzzles, you may want to check to make sure the correction is really correct. Kate Reeves of Fullerton ("Mho Better," Letters, Feb. 1) is mistaken in her assertion that impedance is the reciprocal of resistance and is measured in mhos--she's thinking of conductance. Impedance is the analogue of resistance in a time-dependent circuit and is indeed measured in ohms. So in this case, Puzzler constructors Barry Tunick and Sylvia Bursztyn were right, and the "correction" was wrong.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1997
I had to write to protest Edward Sands' statement that Barry Tunick and Sylvia Bursztyn's puzzles are "no fun" and "impossible to solve" (Letters, Oct. 12). On the contrary, I solve them every week. And part of the fun is figuring out the theme, and how the clues relate to that theme. I'm only sorry that Tunick spelled it out in his reply. You'll probably get a letter from Sands asking you to translate your headline--"MIDABLE." Please don't! We get it! (With the possible exception of Edward Sands.
MAGAZINE
December 2, 1990
This is a long overdue expression of appreciation for your Puzzler page and those wonderful puzzlers, Barry Tunick and Sylvia Bursztyn. Their feel for language, their clever humor, their avoidance of a dull, lumbering vocabulary of crossword-dictionary words and the precision of their definitions are superb. During a period of exile deep in the heart of a large Southwestern city, which shall be nameless (I believe it was named after a long-running TV series), I was unable to find puzzles even approaching the caliber of T & B's little gems, just one more reason for falling prostrate and kissing the ground on my return to Los Angeles Times country.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2000
Whenever anyone writes with comments or questions about the Puzzler, they always begin by praising the authors, Barry Tunick and Sylvia Bursztyn. Well, I'm not going to be any different. The Puzzler is great! It's the primary reason why I subscribe to The Times. Now, concerning the Nov. 12 Puzzler: The answer to 4 down, "OPEC opener," turns out to be "oil." Doesn't OPEC stand for Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries? And if so, shouldn't the correct answer be "org"? Or is this just Barry and Sylvia's way of making the puzzle a little more challenging?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1997
The weekly crossword puzzles by Barry Tunick and Sylvia Bursztyn are usually no fun because they are impossible to solve. For instance, the Sept. 28 Puzzler, entitled "For Starters." Clue: "BEAR." Answer: "RESTRAIN YOURSELF." Clue: "TUNE." Answer: "PILES OF MONEY." Clue: "UM." Answer: "ROUNDTABLE TALK." Etc., etc. I enjoy the problems of research or complicated reasoning involved in the usual puzzles, and I don't solve them all. My solving them is not the point. Ask this pair to stop seeking triumph and rather provide challenge.
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