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Sylvia Cunliffe

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1987
The astonishing news that Sylvia Cunliffe "has been on leave from her $90,243-a-year job since June" (Metro, Oct. 28) caused me to interrupt my lunch to look for my calculator. It would appear that by the end of this week the city will have paid Cunliffe a total of $37,625 for staying at home. JAMES MC LEAN N. Hollywood
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1993 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Tom Bradley recommended firing Los Angeles City Clerk Elias (Lee) Martinez, accused of sexually harassing female members of his staff, in a letter received by City Council members Monday. Aides to several council members said Bradley asked the council to support him in seeking the ouster of the 54-year-old Martinez, one of the city's few Latino department heads. The City Charter requires the council to confirm a decision by Bradley to fire Martinez, who heads an office that provides staff services to council members, keeps all council records and administers city elections.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1986
Your article (Sept. 24) concerning the Street Scene, stated that fighting broke out when " . . . a band that had been mistakenly scheduled to appear failed to show up." Pray tell, what are entertainers who were never booked for an event otherwise expected to do, but not be there? Let's state it correctly, that it happened because Sylvia Cunliffe and other officials never took the responsibility to notify the radio stations, which had been announcing the band's appearance, and post notice at the Street Scene that the appearance of this popular band would not take place.
NEWS
October 6, 1989 | JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writer
Whistle-blower Robert O'Neill, a key figure in the forced retirement of Sylvia Cunliffe as general manager of Los Angeles' General Services Department last year, has agreed to an $800,000 settlement of his lawsuit against the city, authorities said Thursday. Deputy City Atty. Art Walsh said the city and O'Neill, 48, a real estate officer in Cunliffe's department, appeared before Superior Court Judge Bruce R. Geehnaert on Monday to place the agreement on record.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1987
A $25,000 maximum contract to provide legal representation to outgoing city official Sylvia Cunliffe in a pending lawsuit brought by one of her employees was approved Friday by the Los Angeles City Council. Voting 10 to 3, the council agreed to hire the Los Angeles firm of Bayne & Hartley, which also represented Cunliffe in her recent battle to keep her post as head of the General Services Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1987
The Los Angeles City Council agreed Wednesday to hire an outside attorney to represent Sylvia Cunliffe in a lawsuit filed against the city by one of the General Services Department's real estate officers. City Hall sources said the council, in closed session, voted to choose an outside lawyer to represent Cunliffe in the damage suit that Robert O'Neill has filed against the council and Cunliffe over disclosures about his past.
NEWS
July 9, 1987
Sylvia Cunliffe, who is battling to keep her job as head of the Los Angeles General Services Department, has retained Godfrey Isaac, the lawyer who defended former Coroner Thomas Noguchi in Los Angeles County's bitter fight to oust him as chief medical examiner. Isaac, whose combative style marked Noguchi's protracted but unsuccessful legal struggle, said Wednesday that he has been hired to challenge charges of mismanagement and favoritism against Cunliffe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1987
Sylvia Cunliffe's forced leave of absence from Los Angeles' troubled General Services Department was extended Friday by Mayor Tom Bradley so an investigation of alleged mismanagement and favoritism can be completed. In a letter to Cunliffe, who is the target of criminal and administrative investigations of possible misconduct, Bradley wrote that he was extending Cunliffe's paid leave through Sept. 9.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1987 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
In an action that surprised no one, the 1987 Los Angeles Street Scene Festival was canceled by the City Council on Tuesday--a clear casualty of the legal troubles surrounding Sylvia Cunliffe, director of the city's General Services Administration. In voting 9-1 to cancel the event, members voiced hopes that the popular downtown festival can be revived next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1988 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
Sylvia Cunliffe, the fiery city department head forced from office in a wave of scandal, will not be prosecuted for disclosing the arrest records of an employee critic, the state attorney general's office announced Thursday. State prosecutors concluded that as General Services Department chief, Cunliffe was neither authorized to possess nor distribute the records of former employee Robert O'Neill, who had "blown the whistle" on certain of her activities. "But in order to charge Cunliffe . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1988 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner has handed off to state prosecutors a seven-month criminal investigation into former city General Services Department head Sylvia Cunliffe following conflict-of-interest charges made against Reiner by Cunliffe's lawyer. Assistant Dist. Atty. Curt Livesay said Wednesday that the state attorney general agreed to take over the investigation "on an assistance basis" without conceding that a conflict of interest actually exists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1987
A $25,000 maximum contract to provide legal representation to outgoing city official Sylvia Cunliffe in a pending lawsuit brought by one of her employees was approved Friday by the Los Angeles City Council. Voting 10 to 3, the council agreed to hire the Los Angeles firm of Bayne & Hartley, which also represented Cunliffe in her recent battle to keep her post as head of the General Services Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1987
The City Council has done it again. In the name of some sort of convenience and an imagined saving of money, they are giving Cunliffe a present of sick pay and the retention of her pension. One councilwoman claims the "paltry" sum of $30,000 is little enough to be done with Cunliffe and avoid litigation. But what about the $58,000 pension she gets to keep? Seems like the council is too willing to avoid prosecuting this accused criminal at the risk of sending a message to the citizenry: "It's OK to steal!"
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