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Sylvia Earle

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October 8, 1995 | Katy Payne, Katy Payne is a biologist who studies communication in whales and elephants. She is a visiting fellow at Cornell University
Full fathom five my father lies; Of his bones are coral made; Those are pearls that were his eyes; Nothing of him that doth fade, But doth suffer a sea-change Into something rich and strange. The term sea change comes from this ditty, sung by Shakespeare's water sprite Ariel in "The Tempest." We use it now as a term to mean change so profound that one can scarcely grasp the relation between first and later forms.
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October 8, 1995 | Katy Payne, Katy Payne is a biologist who studies communication in whales and elephants. She is a visiting fellow at Cornell University
Full fathom five my father lies; Of his bones are coral made; Those are pearls that were his eyes; Nothing of him that doth fade, But doth suffer a sea-change Into something rich and strange. The term sea change comes from this ditty, sung by Shakespeare's water sprite Ariel in "The Tempest." We use it now as a term to mean change so profound that one can scarcely grasp the relation between first and later forms.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1998 | COLL METCALFE
There are plenty of fish in the sea, but have you ever wondered exactly how many? This summer there will be a chance to find out during the eighth annual Great American Fish Count, which is seeking volunteers to conduct a fish census in waters off the Channel Islands for two weeks beginning July 1. Sylvia Earle, a renowned marine explorer and National Geographic's Explorer in Residence, will train volunteers on how to count fish and what to expect in the waters around the picturesque islands.
NATIONAL
June 16, 2006 | From the Associated Press
President Bush created a vast new marine sanctuary Thursday, extending stronger federal protections to the northwest Hawaiian Islands and the surrounding waters with their endangered monk seals, nesting green sea turtles and other rare species. The Northwestern Hawaiian Islands National Monument covers an archipelago 1,400 miles long and 100 miles wide in the Pacific Ocean. It is home to more than 7,000 species, at least one-fourth of them found nowhere else.
SCIENCE
July 18, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
More than a hundred explorers, scientists and government officials will gather at Long Beach's Aquarium of the Pacific on Friday to draft a blueprint to solve a deep blue problem: About 95% of the world's oceans remains unexplored. The invitation-only forum , hosted by the aquarium and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, aims to identify priorities, technologies and collaborative strategies that could advance understanding of the uncharted mega-wilderness that humans rely on for oxygen, food, medicines, commerce and recreation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1996 | BLAINE BAGGETT, Blaine Baggett is vice president, program development, scheduling, and acquisition for KCET
I would like to respond to Dr. Claire B. Panosian's concerns in Counterpunch about a lack of science programming outside of "Nova" on public television station KCET ("KCET Needs New Science Formula," Calendar, Oct. 7). To begin, why dismiss so out of hand the best science series in all of television? "Nova" is there for viewers 52 weeks a year with the finest science documentaries made anywhere on the planet.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1995 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Late-night TV. Only the Citadel is harder for women to get into. But this fall, two more women are going to take a run at late-night in syndication--former radio host Stephanie Miller and actress and model Lauren Hutton. "The Stephanie Miller Show" premieres Sept. 15 on KCOP-TV Channel 13 and will air weekdays at midnight. Like "Late Show With David Letterman" and "The Tonight Show With Jay Leno," Miller will tape a live show nightly. How is she different? "I have breasts," she says.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1999
Some broadcast and cable programs contain material included in the public school curriculum and on standardized examinations. Here are home-viewing tips: * Today--"48 Hours: Too Much Too Fast" (KCBS 10-11 p.m.) The title of this documentary is deceptive, suggesting "kids in trouble." But it's actually about positive role models--kids overcoming troubles, such as homelessness.
NATIONAL
February 3, 2009 | Jessica Guynn and John Johnson Jr.
Google finally put the world's oceans on the map. During a splashy presentation Monday at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, the Internet giant unveiled a feature in its Google Earth program that will allow users to swim through undersea canyons as deep as the Mariana Trench and encounter creatures like a critically endangered, prehistoric fish called the coelacanth.
TRAVEL
June 9, 2002 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not easy to get into the Explorers Club. Robert E. Peary and Matthew Henson had to make it to the North Pole, doing so on April 6, 1909. Oceanographer Robert Ballard found the wreck of the Titanic in 1985, Sir Edmund Hillary climbed Mt. Everest in 1953 and Thor Heyerdahl sailed from Peru to Polynesia on a raft in 1947. For a less daring traveler like me, getting accepted into the Explorers Club is the stuff of fantasy.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early in the BBC-Discovery Channel documentary "State of the Planet With David Attenborough," the narrator marvels at the sight of a heretofore unknown species: the black-faced marmoset of the Amazon rainforest. "We have no idea how this animal lives or what kind of social interactions take place in its group," says Attenborough, his voice flushed with excitement. "It has yet to be studied."
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