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Sylvia Mcnair

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soprano Sylvia McNair can sing Purcell with the immediacy of a classy Jerome Kern tune and Andre Previn with the poise of a baroque aria. Her voice is warm, even, focused and flexible, and her delivery, as heard in a program that also included works by Mozart, Schubert, Debussy and Bizet on Saturday in Marsee Auditorium at the South Bay Center for the Arts, is unaffected and deceptively easy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1999 | JOSEF WOODARD
The fine art of songwriting, in the art song tradition, has been a practice paid ambivalent attention in our century. San Francisco-based pianist and composer Heggie has taken it upon himself to delve into the venerable songwriting tradition, often referring, stylistically, to romantic 19th century models and hints of smarter Broadway musical thinking, and now has well more than 100 pieces to show for the effort.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1996 | MATTHEW GUREWITSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Music is the best lover you can hope to have," Sylvia McNair says across the long-distance phone line from the Santa Fe Opera, where she stars this summer as Anne Truelove, the good girl who gets left behind in Stravinsky's modern classic "The Rake's Progress." The lilt of her voice conjures up the scrubbed, apple-cheeked face that lights up concert halls around the world and is emblazoned on record jackets. "No matter how much you give it, it gives back more."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES
Soprano Sylvia McNair can sing Purcell with the immediacy of a classy Jerome Kern tune and Andre Previn with the poise of a baroque aria. Her voice is warm, even, focused and flexible, and her delivery, as heard in a program that also included works by Mozart, Schubert, Debussy and Bizet on Saturday in Marsee Auditorium at the South Bay Center for the Arts, is unaffected and deceptively easy.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1999 | JOSEF WOODARD
The fine art of songwriting, in the art song tradition, has been a practice paid ambivalent attention in our century. San Francisco-based pianist and composer Heggie has taken it upon himself to delve into the venerable songwriting tradition, often referring, stylistically, to romantic 19th century models and hints of smarter Broadway musical thinking, and now has well more than 100 pieces to show for the effort.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1999
The 1999-2000 season of San Diego Opera will present five operas, in addition to recitals by opera singers Sylvia McNair, Galina Gorchakova and Simon Estes. The first opera of the Jan. 22 to May 24 season is Verdi's "Il Trovatore," in a new production designed by John David Peters in his San Diego debut, with costumes by John Conklin. Leading roles will be sung by Richard Margison, Sondra Radanovsky (debut), Kathryn Day, Richard Zeller and Brian Matthews (debut).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1998 | JOHN HENKEN
Leonard Bernstein's 80th birthday would be Tuesday and George Gershwin's 100th comes a month later, though programmers for the Hollywood Bowl never need special urging to schedule music by those two masters.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1996 | DANIEL CARIAGA
In the 12 categories in which classical music competes, two in 1996 are notable for nominations that really hit the "best of" mark: best classical contemporary composition--in which the works of four living writers (John Adams, Gyorgy Ligeti, Gunther Schuller and Ellen Taafe Zwilich) and one deceased composer (Olivier Messiaen) are recognized.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1996 | MATTHEW GUREWITSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Music is the best lover you can hope to have," Sylvia McNair says across the long-distance phone line from the Santa Fe Opera, where she stars this summer as Anne Truelove, the good girl who gets left behind in Stravinsky's modern classic "The Rake's Progress." The lilt of her voice conjures up the scrubbed, apple-cheeked face that lights up concert halls around the world and is emblazoned on record jackets. "No matter how much you give it, it gives back more."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soprano Sylvia McNair can sing Purcell with the immediacy of a classy Jerome Kern tune and Andre Previn with the poise of a baroque aria. Her voice is warm, even, focused and flexible, and her delivery, as heard in a program that also included works by Mozart, Schubert, Debussy and Bizet on Saturday in Marsee Auditorium at the South Bay Center for the Arts, is unaffected and deceptively easy.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES
Soprano Sylvia McNair can sing Purcell with the immediacy of a classy Jerome Kern tune and Andre Previn with the poise of a baroque aria. Her voice is warm, even, focused and flexible, and her delivery, as heard in a program that also included works by Mozart, Schubert, Debussy and Bizet on Saturday in Marsee Auditorium at the South Bay Center for the Arts, is unaffected and deceptively easy.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 1996 | DANIEL CARIAGA
In the classical categories, it was mostly a matter of the usual suspects. French conductor-composer Pierre Boulez, who has taken multiple awards for the last two years, added two more Grammys to his collection--for his recording of Debussy with the Cleveland Orchestra, in best classical album and best orchestral performance categories. This puts his lifetime total at 18. Among conductors, only Georg Solti, who wasn't nominated this year, has a higher total with 30.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1996 | DON HECKMAN
There's a bit of melody for almost every taste in PBS' effervescent pledge drive special, "A Grand Night for Singing: Public Television's Gift to You. Hosted by a surprisingly bubbly and outgoing Tyne Daly, the nearly two-hour program, which is presented in four segments, focuses primarily on material from Broadway musicals and the operatic stage.
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