Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSylvia Mosqueda
IN THE NEWS

Sylvia Mosqueda

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 13, 1986
Sylvia Mosqueda, a sophomore at East Los Angeles Community College, apparently got into the Marathon by mistake. Her coach, Greg Ryan, said they were unable to find each other in the huge crowd and she thought he had signed her up at the last minute, while he thought she was just there for a workout (following the pack). "She's real sorry about it (distracting the winner Nancy Ditz)," he said, "she wasn't out to get publicity or anything."
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
February 28, 2002 | SAM FARMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighteen miles into the Los Angeles Marathon, Sylvia Mosqueda was going strong. Her legs felt good, her breathing was relaxed and she had a two-minute lead on the second-place woman. So far ahead was Mosqueda, an unknown 19-year-old from East L.A. College, the TV commentators were writing her off as a fluke, a showboat. Then, at the 19-mile mark, she stunned everyone.
Advertisement
SPORTS
July 16, 1990 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Had it not been for the scorching hot weather, the lack of competition and a new race course--one laid out to accommodate a sponsor--William Musyoki might have come closer to breaking the world record for an eight-kilometer race Sunday at the Bastille Day 8K. But had the conditions been better, would Musyoki, who won his second consecutive title in 23 minutes 29 seconds, have broken Alberto Salazar's record of 22:04? Not according to his assessment. "I'm very, very disappointed.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | KIRBY LEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's not too difficult to predict what Sylvia Mosqueda's race strategy will be. Predicting the outcome of one of Mosqueda's races, however, is a bit more difficult. It's something like trying to guess the life expectancy of a battery in a car with its headlights left on. Will she finish or burn out beforehand?
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | Fernando Dominguez
"Slow down, relax the shoulders," pleaded coach Greg Ryan as his prized pupil steamed around on the brown Rekotan track at Cal State Los Angeles. "If she ever learns to get through the mental and emotional obstacles," he said to a visitor, "she'll be tremendous." She, Ryan's source of pride and frustration, is Sylvia Mosqueda, a 5-foot, 3-inch, 101-pound dynamo who is one of the nation's best female distance runners. On this day, she is working on pacing herself in the 1,500-meter run, with Ryan recording her time after every 400-meter lap. After about a minute's rest, she takes off on a another four-lap run. Mosqueda covers each set in less than five minutes--and hates every one of them.
SPORTS
June 2, 1988 | MAL FLORENCE, Times Staff Writer
Sylvia Mosqueda was sort of a mystery runner when she entered the Los Angeles Marathon unannounced in 1986 and ran 19 miles before she dropped out on what she said was a training run. She was also the marathon leader in the Olympic trials for women last May 1 for 18 miles in Pittsburgh when she had to drop out. But Mosqueda, who finished second in the 1987 L.A.
SPORTS
March 10, 1986 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, Times Staff Writer
Here it was. Nancy Ditz's chance to step out from behind a curtain of obscurity and say, "Hello, I was America's second-fastest women's marathoner in 1985." Joan Benoit Samuelson, Olympic marathon champion, former world-record holder and household name, was America's fastest in the marathon last year. Samuelson's name has marquee value, while Ditz's is about as familiar as the name of the current Bolivian president. In fact, Ditz, from Woodside, Calif.
SPORTS
July 20, 1989 | Barbie Ludovise
Sylvia Mosqueda says she might decide one day to run a race the way others do: relaxed, controlled and cautious. But for now, Mosqueda, a 23-year-old Alhambra resident, is content with her rocket-like starts, tearing out at a blistering pace, zipping through the early miles in lickety-split times. No matter the consequences.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | KIRBY LEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's not too difficult to predict what Sylvia Mosqueda's race strategy will be. Predicting the outcome of one of Mosqueda's races, however, is a bit more difficult. It's something like trying to guess the life expectancy of a battery in a car with its headlights left on. Will she finish or burn out beforehand?
SPORTS
February 28, 2002 | SAM FARMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighteen miles into the Los Angeles Marathon, Sylvia Mosqueda was going strong. Her legs felt good, her breathing was relaxed and she had a two-minute lead on the second-place woman. So far ahead was Mosqueda, an unknown 19-year-old from East L.A. College, the TV commentators were writing her off as a fluke, a showboat. Then, at the 19-mile mark, she stunned everyone.
SPORTS
July 16, 1990 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Had it not been for the scorching hot weather, the lack of competition and a new race course--one laid out to accommodate a sponsor--William Musyoki might have come closer to breaking the world record for an eight-kilometer race Sunday at the Bastille Day 8K. But had the conditions been better, would Musyoki, who won his second consecutive title in 23 minutes 29 seconds, have broken Alberto Salazar's record of 22:04? Not according to his assessment. "I'm very, very disappointed.
SPORTS
July 20, 1989 | Barbie Ludovise
Sylvia Mosqueda says she might decide one day to run a race the way others do: relaxed, controlled and cautious. But for now, Mosqueda, a 23-year-old Alhambra resident, is content with her rocket-like starts, tearing out at a blistering pace, zipping through the early miles in lickety-split times. No matter the consequences.
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | Fernando Dominguez
"Slow down, relax the shoulders," pleaded coach Greg Ryan as his prized pupil steamed around on the brown Rekotan track at Cal State Los Angeles. "If she ever learns to get through the mental and emotional obstacles," he said to a visitor, "she'll be tremendous." She, Ryan's source of pride and frustration, is Sylvia Mosqueda, a 5-foot, 3-inch, 101-pound dynamo who is one of the nation's best female distance runners. On this day, she is working on pacing herself in the 1,500-meter run, with Ryan recording her time after every 400-meter lap. After about a minute's rest, she takes off on a another four-lap run. Mosqueda covers each set in less than five minutes--and hates every one of them.
SPORTS
June 2, 1988 | MAL FLORENCE, Times Staff Writer
Sylvia Mosqueda was sort of a mystery runner when she entered the Los Angeles Marathon unannounced in 1986 and ran 19 miles before she dropped out on what she said was a training run. She was also the marathon leader in the Olympic trials for women last May 1 for 18 miles in Pittsburgh when she had to drop out. But Mosqueda, who finished second in the 1987 L.A.
SPORTS
February 27, 1987 | LARRY STEWART
If you think running a marathon is tough, you ought to try televising one. Just ask some of those working Sunday's Los Angeles Marathon for KCOP (Channel 13). "We have 213 employees and at least 150 of them will be involved with the race in some capacity," Rick Feldman, station manager, said. Although many of the technicians and cameramen are hired from outside, about 50 KCOP employees will be on the job Sunday. The other 100 or so will be volunteers.
NEWS
March 13, 1986
Sylvia Mosqueda, a sophomore at East Los Angeles Community College, apparently got into the Marathon by mistake. Her coach, Greg Ryan, said they were unable to find each other in the huge crowd and she thought he had signed her up at the last minute, while he thought she was just there for a workout (following the pack). "She's real sorry about it (distracting the winner Nancy Ditz)," he said, "she wasn't out to get publicity or anything."
SPORTS
February 27, 1987 | LARRY STEWART
If you think running a marathon is tough, you ought to try televising one. Just ask some of those working Sunday's Los Angeles Marathon for KCOP (Channel 13). "We have 213 employees and at least 150 of them will be involved with the race in some capacity," Rick Feldman, station manager, said. Although many of the technicians and cameramen are hired from outside, about 50 KCOP employees will be on the job Sunday. The other 100 or so will be volunteers.
SPORTS
March 10, 1986 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, Times Staff Writer
Here it was. Nancy Ditz's chance to step out from behind a curtain of obscurity and say, "Hello, I was America's second-fastest women's marathoner in 1985." Joan Benoit Samuelson, Olympic marathon champion, former world-record holder and household name, was America's fastest in the marathon last year. Samuelson's name has marquee value, while Ditz's is about as familiar as the name of the current Bolivian president. In fact, Ditz, from Woodside, Calif.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|