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Sylvia Rhone

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BUSINESS
July 22, 1994 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The music industry's good ol' boys club finally opened its doors this week when Warner Music Group promoted Sylvia Rhone to head its mammoth Elektra/EastWest division--the latest twist in a dramatic shake-up at the world's largest record corporation. "We smashed right through the glass ceiling this time," said Rhone, 42, referring to her status as the most powerful woman in the music industry.
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BUSINESS
November 27, 1995 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rumors are not true. Sylvia Rhone will not be among the names announced this morning in New York when her mentor, MCA Music Chairman Doug Morris, unveils his new management team. That's not to say that MCA and several other firms haven't tried in recent months to lure Rhone away from her current post as chair of Time Warner's Elektra Entertainment.
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BUSINESS
November 27, 1995 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rumors are not true. Sylvia Rhone will not be among the names announced this morning in New York when her mentor, MCA Music Chairman Doug Morris, unveils his new management team. That's not to say that MCA and several other firms haven't tried in recent months to lure Rhone away from her current post as chair of Time Warner's Elektra Entertainment.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1994 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The music industry's good ol' boys club finally opened its doors this week when Warner Music Group promoted Sylvia Rhone to head its mammoth Elektra/EastWest division--the latest twist in a dramatic shake-up at the world's largest record corporation. "We smashed right through the glass ceiling this time," said Rhone, 42, referring to her status as the most powerful woman in the music industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1993 | Chuck Philips
Sylvia Rhone, generally regarded as the most powerful woman in the record industry, never doubted that she'd one day run her own company. The Harlem native, who grew up listening to Aretha Franklin and Marvin Gaye, says repeated encounters with racism and sexism in the music industry only fueled her commitment to push harder.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2006 | From a Times Staff Writer
The nation's largest music company, Universal Music Group, plans to split one of its largest divisions in two, company executives said. Universal Motown Records Group, until now co-headed by executives Monte Lipman and Sylvia Rhone, will be split into Universal Republic, overseen by Lipman, and Universal Motown, headed by Rhone. The New York-based labels are expected to hire as many as 30 new employees between them.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Elektra Entertainment Group Chief Executive Sylvia Rhone offered Sean "P. Diddy" Combs $30 million to bring his Bad Boy label to AOL Time Warner Inc.'s Warner Music Group, the New York Post reported, citing sources. The sources said Combs, who is seeking a $100-million offer, wants to use Rhone's offer to get higher bids from Sony Corp.'s Sony Music Entertainment and Vivendi Universal's Universal Music Group.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1994
STACKING UP SALES Total album and single sales of CDs and cassettes for the week ended Oct. 30, compared to week-ago and year-ago levels, in millions of units sold: Latest week: Albums: 10.5 Singles: 1.8 Week-ago: Albums: 10.6 Singles: 1.8 Year-ago: Albums: 10.0 Singles: 2.2 Hits Magazine Tip of the Week Look for Polly Anthony to become the only female president of a major record label. (Sylvia Rhone serves as chairman/CEO of Elektra Entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1993 | Chuck Philips
Sylvia Rhone, generally regarded as the most powerful woman in the record industry, never doubted that she'd one day run her own company. The Harlem native, who grew up listening to Aretha Franklin and Marvin Gaye, says repeated encounters with racism and sexism in the music industry only fueled her commitment to push harder.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2004 | Jeff Leeds, Times Staff Writer
A private investor consortium led by Edgar Bronfman Jr. said it completed its $2.6-billion purchase of Time Warner Inc.'s worldwide music division and began a restructuring that would slash about 1,000 people from its payroll. As expected, Atlantic Group Chairman Val Azzoli and Elektra Entertainment Group Chairwoman Sylvia Rhone exited the company as Bronfman initiated a merger of the two New York-based labels.
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