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BUSINESS
February 9, 2012 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
A hacker has released stolen source code from Symantec Corp., one of the largest computer security firms, after a phony set of ransom negotiations failed, according to the company. The source code is part of a Symantec product called pcAnywhere, which enables users to log into and control home or work computers from remote locations. Access to the code could in theory give hackers insight into how to seize computers that use the software. Symantec said the source code was for 2006 products that had since been updated with newer code.
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BUSINESS
April 26, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO — As it closes in on 1 billion users, Facebook Inc. has formed partnerships with five security software outfits to crack down on pfishing schemes. Facebook said Wednesday that Microsoft Corp., McAfee Inc., Trend Micro Inc., Sophos Ltd. and Symantec Corp. will join the fight to keep its users from sharing links to sites that install malware. Facebook also has its own tools in its arsenal and a vast database of malicious URLs. Facebook users, who number more than 900 million, post a ton of links, some from blacklisted sites.
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NEWS
January 24, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Symantec Corp., the world's biggest maker of security software, reported a 13% earnings increase and gave a forecast that beat analysts' estimates, sending shares up 9% after hours. Fiscal third-quarter net income rose to $131.9 million, or 15 cents a share, from $116.8 million, or 12 cents, a year earlier. Sales gained 15% to $1.52 billion for the quarter ended Dec. 28. The Cupertino, Calif.-based company forecast that profit would rise to 33 cents to 35 cents a share for the current year, beating Wall Street expectations of 30 cents.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Losing a smartphone won't just cost you the price of a new phone. A recent study shows that there's a strong likelihood it will cost you your privacy as well. There is a 96% chance that the finder of a lost cellphone will access the device, and an 89% chance that the finder will access it for personal-related apps and information, according to a new study  commissioned by the privacy software company Symantec Corp. The study also found that there is only a 50% chance the finder will try to return the phone to the person who lost it. Symantec arrived at these conclusions after deliberately "losing" a total of 50 smartphones in five cities: New York City, Washington D.C., Los Angeles, San Francisco and Ottawa, Canada.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO — As it closes in on 1 billion users, Facebook Inc. has formed partnerships with five security software outfits to crack down on pfishing schemes. Facebook said Wednesday that Microsoft Corp., McAfee Inc., Trend Micro Inc., Sophos Ltd. and Symantec Corp. will join the fight to keep its users from sharing links to sites that install malware. Facebook also has its own tools in its arsenal and a vast database of malicious URLs. Facebook users, who number more than 900 million, post a ton of links, some from blacklisted sites.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1997 | JACLYN EASTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Jaclyn Easton hosts the syndicated radio show "Log On U.S.A."
Attention, small-Web-site owners: You have something the big guys don't--a niche audience. And that means your site can be a moneymaker, even if its small size and narrow appeal may limit your opportunities to attract banner advertising. "The Internet is not a mass market, it's a one-to-one medium," says Rosalind Resnick, editor of the Digital Director Marketing Letter (http://www.netcreations.com/ddm), which tracks trends in online marketing.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Losing a smartphone won't just cost you the price of a new phone. A recent study shows that there's a strong likelihood it will cost you your privacy as well. There is a 96% chance that the finder of a lost cellphone will access the device, and an 89% chance that the finder will access it for personal-related apps and information, according to a new study  commissioned by the privacy software company Symantec Corp. The study also found that there is only a 50% chance the finder will try to return the phone to the person who lost it. Symantec arrived at these conclusions after deliberately "losing" a total of 50 smartphones in five cities: New York City, Washington D.C., Los Angeles, San Francisco and Ottawa, Canada.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Symantec Corp., the largest maker of computer security software for consumers, agreed to buy rival Axent Technologies Inc. for about $975 million in stock to beef up its product line for businesses. Axent shareholders will get one-half of a Symantec share for each Axent share. The purchase comes as Symantec Chief Executive John Thompson refashions the maker of PC software such as Norton AntiVirus into a provider of security software and services to large companies.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Symantec Corp., which is buying Veritas Software Corp. for $12.3 billion, said Wednesday that third-quarter profit increased 47% as sales of the Norton antivirus computer program gained. Net income rose to $163.6 million, or 22 cents a share, in the quarter ended Dec. 31 from $111.5 million, or 16 cents, a year earlier. Sales increased 41% to $695.2 million. Computer owners' fears of viruses boosted demand for the antivirus program, helping Cupertino, Calif.
BUSINESS
September 29, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Symantec Corp., one of the leading makers of software that detects computer bugs, agreed to buy Intel Corp.'s antivirus business for $18 million in cash. Symantec plans to meld its Norton AntiVirus technology with an antivirus system Intel has been developing for the last year. As part of the transaction, Intel will recommend Norton AntiVirus products to corporate customers and market them through its distributors.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2012 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
A hacker has released stolen source code from Symantec Corp., one of the largest computer security firms, after a phony set of ransom negotiations failed, according to the company. The source code is part of a Symantec product called pcAnywhere, which enables users to log into and control home or work computers from remote locations. Access to the code could in theory give hackers insight into how to seize computers that use the software. Symantec said the source code was for 2006 products that had since been updated with newer code.
NATIONAL
January 27, 2009 | Jim Puzzanghera
John W. Thompson, the outgoing chief executive of network security firm Symantec Corp., has emerged as a leading contender to be Commerce secretary, a move that would give the high-tech industry a major voice in the Obama administration. Over the last decade, Thompson led the Cupertino, Calif.-based company from a small software maker to the top provider of antivirus and security programs, known for its Norton brand of products.
NEWS
January 24, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Symantec Corp., the world's biggest maker of security software, reported a 13% earnings increase and gave a forecast that beat analysts' estimates, sending shares up 9% after hours. Fiscal third-quarter net income rose to $131.9 million, or 15 cents a share, from $116.8 million, or 12 cents, a year earlier. Sales gained 15% to $1.52 billion for the quarter ended Dec. 28. The Cupertino, Calif.-based company forecast that profit would rise to 33 cents to 35 cents a share for the current year, beating Wall Street expectations of 30 cents.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Symantec Corp., the maker of computer anti-virus products, agreed Monday to buy Altiris Inc. for about $1.03 billion to gain programs that track corporate software use. Altiris products help clients track, install and maintain their software on desktops, laptops, servers and hand-held devices. Symantec Chief Executive John Thompson is expanding the company's product line after reporting slowing sales of storage software sold to large customers last quarter.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Security software vendor Symantec Corp. accused Microsoft Corp. on Wednesday of abusing its monopoly in deciding which security products can run on its upcoming operating system. Symantec said Microsoft, which started selling its own security products in May, was deliberately withholding information needed to develop products that work on Windows Vista.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2006 | From Dow Jones/the Associated Press
Symantec Corp. said it agreed to pay $36 million to settle a claim by the Internal Revenue Service that the company owed $100 million in back taxes. The Cupertino, Calif.-based provider of software for data security and storage continues to dispute another claim that it owes $900 million in back taxes related to its acquisition of Veritas Software Inc. Symantec says it expects to complete the settlement, which relates to an audit of its 2003 and 2004 fiscal years, by the end of the month.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1999
Symantec Corp., maker of anti-virus and computer security software, named former IBM Corp. executive John W. Thompson its chief executive and president, replacing Gordon Eubanks, a software industry pioneer. Thompson, 49, was with IBM for almost three decades, most recently as general manager of its Americas unit. Last week, Eubanks resigned to become president and CEO of closely held software start-up Oblix Inc. Shares of Cupertino, Calif.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1998 | Karen Kaplan
Symantec's president and chief executive accused Santa Monica-based CyberMedia, a software developer, of suing his firm to stem market-share losses. Gordon Eubanks officially denied CyberMedia's charges that Cupertino-based Symantec stole trade secrets and computer codes and used them in its Norton Uninstall Deluxe program. In a lawsuit filed last week, CyberMedia outlined similarities between that product and its own offering, UnInstaller.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Symantec Corp., the world's largest maker of antivirus software, said the Internal Revenue Service was seeking about $1 billion in additional taxes, most of it related to the recently acquired Veritas Software Corp. The IRS is seeking $900 million in extra taxes from Veritas for 2000 and 2001, excluding penalties and interest, Symantec said in a filing Monday with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The IRS also is seeking $100 million for Symantec's 2003 and 2004 tax years.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2005 | From Reuters
Symantec Corp., the world's largest security software maker, Wednesday posted a 3% rise in fiscal fourth-quarter profit led by demand for its Norton AntiVirus software, and gave a current-quarter outlook above Wall Street consensus estimates. The Cupertino, Calif.-based company, whose stock slipped slightly in after-hours trading, said net income rose to $120 million, or 16 cents a share, from $117 million, or 16 cents, a year earlier.
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